slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Should the State Play Nanny? Bob Reitemeier Chief Executive The Children’s Society London PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Should the State Play Nanny? Bob Reitemeier Chief Executive The Children’s Society London

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 23

Should the State Play Nanny? Bob Reitemeier Chief Executive The Children’s Society London - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 113 Views
  • Uploaded on

Should the State Play Nanny? Bob Reitemeier Chief Executive The Children’s Society London 26 November 2004. With children, for children, with you. Should the State Play Nanny?. What do we mean by ‘nanny’? The state, the parent and the child Policy areas, eg Choosing Health

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Should the State Play Nanny? Bob Reitemeier Chief Executive The Children’s Society London' - mahina


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1
Should the State Play Nanny?

Bob Reitemeier

Chief Executive

The Children’s Society

London

26 November 2004

With children, for children, with you

slide2

Should the State Play Nanny?

What do we mean by ‘nanny’?

  • The state, the parent and the child
  • Policy areas, eg Choosing Health
  • Regulation of industry / Influencing behaviour

With children, for children, with you

slide3

Should the State Play Nanny?

“Nanny” – Oxford dictionary

Noun:

  • A woman employed to look after a child in its own home.
  • A female goat.

Adjective:

Interfering and overprotective: the nanny state.

With children, for children, with you

slide4

Should the State Play Nanny?

The relationship between parent & child

  • Every Child Matters and the Children Act
  • We must do better

With children, for children, with you

slide5

Should the State Play Nanny?

The roles of the state

  • Enabler
  • Corporate parent

With children, for children, with you

slide6

Should the State Play Nanny?

The state as an enabler

  • What is the role of the state as an enabler?
  • What is causing us to revisit this role today?
  • What should change as a result?

With children, for children, with you

slide7

Should the State Play Nanny?

The state as an enabler

  • Providing restrictions, eg physical punishment of children
  • Providing an enabling environment within which parent – child relationships can prosper.

With children, for children, with you

slide8

Should the State Play Nanny?

Why revisit the state’s role today?

  • Beyond children’s services reform.
  • Changes in what we mean by ‘childhood’
  • Welfare state => Thatcherism => Today?

With children, for children, with you

slide9

Should the State Play Nanny?

What is different?

Family

THENNOW

Mortality: under 5 yrs old (1960) 27 per 1000 7 per 1000 (2002)

Mortality: under 1 yrs old (1960) 23 per 1000 5 per 1000 (2002)

Proportion of lone parent HHs (1971) 3% 6% (1991)

Divorces (1950) 40,000 157,000 (2001)

Children under the age of 16 (1971) 14.3m 12.1m (2000)

With children, for children, with you

slide10

Should the State Play Nanny?

What is different?

1951-551996-00

Births: Outside marriage

15-19 year olds 141,000 258,000

20-44 year olds 837,0001,160,000

Total 978,000 (6%) 1,418,000 (42%)

Within marriage

15-19 year olds 499,000 31,000

20-44 year olds 14,266,0001,922,000

Total 15,743,000 (94%) 3,371,000 (58%)

Births to teenage mothers 59,000 (2000)

With children, for children, with you

slide11

Should the State Play Nanny?

What is different?

Drug Use

19982003

Used drugs in the last year

11-15 year olds - all drugs 11% 21%

11-15 year olds - cannabis 7% 13%

16-24 year olds - all drugs 29% 28%

16-24 year olds - cannabis 29% 26%

With children, for children, with you

slide12

Should the State Play Nanny?

What is different?

TV, Computer, Mobile Phones

Access to TV 99% of households have access to TV

Access to computer 4/5 CYP have access to home computer

Access to internet >50% of CYP have access to internet (home)

Mobile phones <20% of primary age CYP have phones

60% of secondary age CYP have phones

With children, for children, with you

slide13

Should the State Play Nanny?

What is different?

Diet and health

Obesity Childhood obesity - tripled in last 20 years

Food industry Global advertising budget is $40 billion.

Advertising: Greater than the GDP of 70% of countries.

With children, for children, with you

nuffield study

25.0%

% with difficulties

20.4%

20.0%

16.9%

16.7%

15.0%

13.4%

13.1%

13.3%

12.8%

12.1%

11.1%

10.0%

8.6%

8.3%

7.6%

7.8%

7.8%

7.1%

6.6%

6.0%

5.7%

5.0%

0.0%

Behaviour

Hyperactivity

Emotional

1974 Boys

1974 Girls

1986 Boys

1986 Girls

1999 Boys

1999 Girls

Should the State Play Nanny?

Nuffield Study

Nuffield Study: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Nov. 2004

With children, for children, with you

slide15

Should the State Play Nanny?

What is different?

Stress and mental health

Norwich Union Healthcare study, 400 parents surveyed, all with children between the ages of 5 and 15:

78% felt their CYP were under greater pressure than they experienced.

24% felt out of touch or distant from their children.

74% worried that lack of communication in families => problems.

58% did not know where to go for help.

With children, for children, with you

slide16

Should the State Play Nanny?

What is different?

Data we do not yet have…

ADD / ADHD and its link to diet, artificial additives, zinc, fatty acids, genetic predisposition…

The increasing levels of anxiety experienced by teenagers – is the same phenomenon occurring with younger children?

What is the cumulative impact of ‘environmental’ changes on our children?

With children, for children, with you

slide17

Should the State Play Nanny?

What should change as a result?

Parents and children require more and different help than is currently provided.

  • Childhood, and therefore parenting, is more complex.
  • We need to better understand the needs of both.
  • We need to better understand the rights of both.
  • We need to better understand the environment we live in.

With children, for children, with you

slide18

Should the State Play Nanny?

What should change as a result?

  • Enable the individual relationship between the child and the primary carer to develop.
  • Emphasise the first year of life, eg brain development and stress.
  • Enable and support the parent – AND involve children!

With children, for children, with you

slide19

Should the State Play Nanny?

What should change as a result?

  • Invest significantly in community facilitators.
  • Parent to parent works better than state to parent.
  • Present children positively – by the government and the press.

With children, for children, with you

slide20

Should the State Play Nanny?

Love and care for our children.

Enable parents to be better carers, better teachers.

Every child should be made to feel precious.

With children, for children, with you

slide21

Should the State Play Nanny?

This does not describe a nanny state.

This is a caring state.

With children, for children, with you

slide22

The Children’s Society

We look at the world through the eyes of children and never flinch from what we see.

With children, for children, with you

slide23

Should the State Play Nanny?

List of Sources

Mortality rates: www.unicef.org/infobycountry/uk-statistics.html

Births 1951-2000: Births, 1938-2002, Office of National Statistics.

Population: Social Focus in Brief: Children 2002, Office of National Statistics, 2002.

Drug Use: Department of Health Statistical Bulletin: Statistics on Young People and Drug Use

1998, Office of National Statistics: 1998.

Department of Health Statistical Bulletin: Statistics on Young People and Drug Use

2003, Office of National Statistics: 2003.

Access to

Technology: Social Focus in Brief: Children 2002, Office of National Statistics: 2002.

Obesity: House of Commons Obesity Report, Health Committee Press Release, 26 May 04.

Food Marketing: Broadcasting Bad Health: Why food marketing to children needs to be controlled, A

report by the International Association of Consumer Food Organisations (IAFCO)

for the World Health Organisation consultation on a global strategy for diet and

health, IAFCO, July 2003.

Parents on

Children’s Health: BBC on-line report on the Norwich Union Healthcare study, October 2004.

With children, for children, with you