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“When schools become places for teachers to learn, they also become schools on the way to improvement.” Willis Hawley and Linda Valli University of Maryland. Strangers are friends you have yet to meet. Like Me.

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Presentation Transcript
slide1
“When schools become places for teachers to learn, they also become schools on the way to improvement.”

Willis Hawley and Linda Valli University of Maryland

like me
Like Me
  • How many of you are elementary teachers? (Please introduce yourselves) Middle school teachers? High school teachers? Administrators? Others?
  • Prior to today, how many have served on a district committee?
  • How many have a child graduating this spring?
  • How many plan to travel outside of South Dakota this summer?
  • How many plan to travel overseas?
leadership team orientation
Leadership Team Orientation

Leadership Team

  • Marzano Research

Professional Learning Communities

Application

slide5
Leadership Team
  • Who are we?
  • Why are we doing this?
  • Why are we doing this THIS way?
slide6
Why You Are Here

Reading Goal: All students will improve reading skills across the curriculum.

Math Goal: All students will improve math skills across the curriculum.

slide7
Need

(Develop a process for meeting NCA goals)

Intervention

District must “intervene” to plan for ways that the district can meet the goals set within

their School Improvement or NCA Plans.

(Example: A group meets to select a strategy/strategies to implement K-12)

Strategy

What the group must select for individual teachers to use to help raise student achievement.

Strategies must align with the goals set in the School Improvement or NCA Plans.

(Example: Cues, Questions and Organizers OR Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback)

Tools

The implementation of the strategy (Example: Using a Graphic Organizer to solve a story problem)

Tools support the strategies being used with the students.

Tool are used to effectively implement the strategy. Tools focus on the learning goal of a lesson.

(Professional development is required to teach teachers how to best implement

the strategy using specific tools.)

slide8
Knee-Knee Eye-Eye

Layered Questioning

slide9
“Every great teacher is clearly teaching –

and every great teacher is learning.”

slide10
Preparing All Students for Success

Purposeful instruction, assessment, and staff development.

Actively promote a climate of achievement: Incentives and celebrations.

Structure strong school building leadership.

Support students in building knowledge and skills for success today and tomorrow.

slide11
Step into the PASS Team Process
  • (Preparing All Students for Success)
  • The vision of this leadership team process is to meet
  • the individual needs of schools.
  • Select staff
  • Four trainings during the 2004-2005 school year
  • Plan and organize training
  • Training staff during in-service days.
  • One or two research-based instructional strategies (graphic organizers, questioning, etc) will be introduced.
  • Strategies are tools that are intended to enhance teachers’ practice.
  • Examining student work.
  • The PASS Team process is research-based and correlates with effective professional development models proven to enhance student achievement.
slide12
A School District That Cannot Learn…

Cannot Teach

Is our stated purpose consistent with our daily practice?

Instructional Strategies

Driving

Student Achievement

Students’ Needs Driving

District Goals

Assessment

SIP/NCA Plans

PASS Team

Building

Students

Adapted from: Johnson, D. Sustaining Change in Schools, 2005.

slide13
PASS Training

I Do It

We Do It

You Do It

slide15
Creating a Connected Community

Commitment to a Shared Purpose

Access to Information

Networking

LEARNING

Networking

Collaboration and Purpose

Leadership and

Facilitation

slide16
Step 1

Dialogue

Work Together

plc graphic organizer
PLC Graphic Organizer

Step 2

  • Article is divided into three sections
  • Divide group accordingly
  • All read the introduction and conclusion. Each member reads his/her numbered section
  • As you read the section, record important information on graphic organizer
  • You will have 7 minutes to read your section and take notes
  • Please be mindful of those that are still reading
plc graphic organizer1
PLC Graphic Organizer

Step 3

  • Choose a recorder and reporter
  • Discuss your section with your group
  • Determine ONE key idea from the article and post on the left side of T-Chart
  • Determine how you would achieve the key idea back at your building(s) and post on the right side of T-Chart
  • The reporter will explain the T-Chart to the large group
  • You will have 15 minutes to complete this assignment
reflect transfer implement
Reflect/Transfer/Implement

Refer to section 8 in your binder

As a team, take some time to:

  • reflect on the two graphic organizers, and
  • record ways to use it to inform instruction.
slide21
If schools want to enhance their organizational capacity to boost student learning,

they should work on building a professional community that is characterized by

a shared purpose,

collaborative activity, and

collective responsibility among staff.

back at the campsite
Back at the Campsite . . .
  • Trailblazers
  • Pioneers
  • Homesteaders
  • City Folk
  • Saboteurs
slide24
Marzano’s Research

What does this research tell us about schools?

What does this research tell us about teachers?

slide25
You have to hire the whole environment.

“For a flower to blossom, you need the right soil as well as the right seed.”

(William Bernback, as quoted in Developing the Leaders Around You, Maxwell)

The right atmosphere allows potential leaders to bloom and grow.

slide26
Robert Marzano

What Work in Schools: Translating Research into Action

Classroom Instruction That Works: Research-based Strategies for Increasing Student Achievement

A Handbook for Classroom Instruction That Works

Building Background Knowledge for Academic Achievement: Research on What Works in Schools

Classroom Management That Works: Research-based Strategies for Every Teacher

slide27
Strategy:

Cues, Questions and Organizers

  • Tools:
  • Highly Effective Questioning
  • Instructional Strategies
  • Problem Solving
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Examining Student Work
  • Research
questioning
Questioning
  • We use questions because of their unique ability to help us develop students’ abilities to “think critically”.
  • Individually, define the phrase “Critical Thinking Skill”.
  • As a group, determine what characteristics would be required for a skill to be considered a “Critical Thinking Skill”.
a critical thinking skill must be
A Critical Thinking Skill must be…
  • A mental act: Requires a mental effort directed toward some underlying content, whether that content is text, a picture, sounds, or a set of symbols.
  • A critical act: The mental act in a questions must be important or useful (critical). Without importance the act in question becomes only a thinking skill.
  • Amenable to instruction: Must have the potential to be developed and improved through teaching or instruction.
  • Generalizable across content: Must be useful or applicable to learning and problem-solving in more than one content area and possibly several.
example to recall
Example: To Recall
  • Is this a mental act?
  • Is this a critical?
  • Is this amenable to instruction?
  • Is this generalizable across content?
example to compare
Example: To Compare
  • Is this a mental act?
  • Is this a critical?
  • Is this amenable to instruction?
  • Is this generalizable across content?
article jigsaw
Article Jigsaw
  • Article is divided into three sections
  • Number off by three’s
  • All read conclusion. Each member reads his/her numbered section
article jigsaw1
Article Jigsaw
  • As you read the section, use the following marks:

?For something you have a question about

! For something new you learned

* For something you already knew

You will have 7 minutes to read your section and make notes.

Please be mindful of those that are still reading.

summing it up
Summing it up
  • Create groups of 1, 2, and 3’s
  • Take 6 minutes to brief each other on your section of the reading
  • Discuss the following question:

How do you think questioning is going to help you meet the NCA goals?

slide36
Ask yourself

“thisquestion”

when confronted by a difficult problem…

“How would Superman handle this?”

assessment discussion
Assessment Discussion

Considering the ABC Graphic Organizer

or

the PLC Graphic Organizer . . .

What is going to be assessed and how?

assessment questions
Assessment Questions

Are we assessing whether teachers appropriately teach graphic organizers or questioning techniques?

NO

Are we assessing student achievement in reading and math?

NO

This is assessed through the state and district standardized tests.

What are we assessing?

How should we assess it?

Rubric

Checklist

Other

guiding questions
Guiding Questions
  • Does the tool represent both content and skills?
  • Does the tool focus on learning outcomes that require critical thinking skills? (Questioning vs. Graphic Organizers)
  • Does the tool minimize skills that are irrelevant to the outcome or purpose?
  • Does the tool provide adequate scaffolding?
  • What feedback can you gain feedback from the tool?
  • Could a student transfer the skill of using the tool?
  • Is it sustainable?
leadership team review
Leadership Team Review

Leadership Team

  • Marzano Research

Professional Learning Communities

Application

slide42
Application

Develop a Plan

slide43
Roll up the sleeves…Apply the learning….
  • Discuss
  • Consolidate
  • Map Out
  • Present
slide45
When all else fails…

Walk fast…

and look

WORRIED!

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