Book Report Academic Writing for Graduate Students Essential Tasks and Skills (3 rd edition) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

book report academic writing for graduate students essential tasks and skills 3 rd edition n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Book Report Academic Writing for Graduate Students Essential Tasks and Skills (3 rd edition) PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Book Report Academic Writing for Graduate Students Essential Tasks and Skills (3 rd edition)

play fullscreen
1 / 75
Book Report Academic Writing for Graduate Students Essential Tasks and Skills (3 rd edition)
544 Views
Download Presentation
lynton
Download Presentation

Book Report Academic Writing for Graduate Students Essential Tasks and Skills (3 rd edition)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Book ReportAcademic Writing for Graduate Students Essential Tasks and Skills (3rd edition) Asst. Prof. Dr. Siriluck Usaha Department of English for Business Communication School Liberal Arts

  2. Academic Writing for Graduate Students Essential Tasks and Skills I. About the Book II. Target Readers III. Approach and Organization IV. What is learnt from the book?

  3. I. About the Book

  4. I. About the Book

  5. II. Target Readers • Graduate Students • Non-native graduate students • EFL/ESL teachers

  6. III. Approach and OrganizationApproach: Analytical & rhetorical Rhetorical Conciousness Raising Cycle

  7. Organization:Varied tasks & activities, basic orientation to writing an article for publication • Table of Contents

  8. Table of Contents

  9. Table of Contents

  10. IV. What is learnt from the book? How to write articles for publication? I. Reasons for publication II. Overall shape of a research article III. Four sections: IMRD IV. Genre analysis • Definition • Why GA? V. Abstracts VI. Introductions VII. Methods VIII. Results IX. Discussion

  11. 1. Reasons for Publication • Sharing findings and contributions (in English) to scholars communities • Competition against other research papers for acceptance and recognition • Academic promotion and research funds • Graduation requirement

  12. 2. The Overall Shape of a Research Paper

  13. 3. Four Sections: Four Different Purposes

  14. 4. Genre Analysis • Genre analysis focuses primarily on the organizational structure of texts and the conventional linguistics features associated with a particular genre. That is, each text type conforms to the culturally expected way of constructing texts belonging to the variety. For example, research article introductions have expected textual conventions that are different from research article methods sections (Kanoksilapatham, 2012) • Definition of Genre (Swales, 1990)

  15. Why Genre Analysis? • “To be successful in a publishing research work, scientists, like scholars of other disciplines, need to be able to express the findings and contributions in English . Moreover, they need to present the findings and contributions in a manner that is acceptable and conforming to the requirements of the target journal.” (Swales, 1991 quoted in Kanoksilapatham, 2004, 230) • The goal of genre analysis is to identify the rhetorical organization of texts belonging to a given genre.

  16. Genre Analysis and Research Articles • The genre analysis applied to research articles of each academic discipline elucidates the textual structural conventionally followed by scientists in their respective disciplines. • Based of this notion, the terms ‘move’ and ‘step’ are invented to refer to textual units of analysis. • ‘Move’ refers to a text segment that performs a communicative function. • ‘Step’ is a subunit of a move that, in turn, contributes to the move’s communicative function.

  17. Swales’ (2004) model for research article introductions

  18. Move structure for biochemistry research article (Kanoksilapatham, 2005) • Introduction Section

  19. Move structure for biochemistry research article (Kanoksilapatham, 2005) • Methods Section

  20. Move structure for biochemistry research article (Kanoksilapatham, 2005) • Results Sections

  21. Move structure for biochemistry research article (Kanoksilapatham, 2005) • Discussion Section

  22. 5. Research Article Abstracts • The abstract is the first part that can be read for getting information about a research article within a few minutes. • Most researchers often focus on skimming abstracts and key words. • Hyland (2002) states that “the abstract is generally the readers’ first encounter with a text, and is often the point at which they decide whether to continue and give the accompanying article further attention, or to ignore it” (p. 63). • According to Pho (2008), “acquiring the skills of writing an abstracts is therefore important to novice writers to enter the discourse community of their discipline” (p. 231).

  23. Rhetorical Moves in Article Abstracts

  24. Language Use in Abstract • Introduction Move: Present simple/ Present perfect • Purpose Move: Present/ Past simple • Method Move: - Action verb (use, investigate, compare) - Passive voice (was used, was stimulated) - Past simple • Product/Result Move: - Perceptive verbs (found, seen, shown, indicated) - Passive voice - Past tense • Conclusion Move: - Interpretive Verbs (summarize, conclude, elucidate) - Use hedging words such as might, may should, plausibly, possibly

  25. Practice: Identify Rhetorical Moves in Abstract

  26. 6. IntroductionSections Creating a Research Space • It is widely recognized that writing Introductions can be slow, difficult, and troublesome for many writers. • The Introductions of RPs typically follow the pattern in the following figure in response to kinds of competition: Competition for readers and competition for research space. • The rhetorical pattern has become known as the create-a-research-space model (or CARS) by Swales (1990).

  27. Swales’ Model 2004

  28. Language Focus: ‘Move 1- Establishing a research territory’ • In Move 1 certain fixed phrases tend to occur as shown in the table below.

  29. Language Focus: Citation and tense

  30. Language Focus: Citation and tense

  31. Language Focus: ‘Move 2- Establishing a niche’

  32. Language Focus: ‘Move 2- Establishing a niche’ • Negative Openings in Move 2

  33. Language Focus: ‘Move 2- Establishing a niche’

  34. Language Focus: ‘Move 3 Step 1- Announcing present research descriptively and/or purposively’

  35. Language Focus: ‘Move 3 Step 1- Announcing present research descriptively and/or purposively’

  36. Language Focus: ‘Move 3 Step 1- Announcing present research descriptively and/or purposively’ • Purpose statement and tense

  37. Language Focus: ‘Move 3 Step 1- Announcing present research descriptively and/or purposively’ • Completing an Introduction

  38. Language Focus: ‘Move 3 Step 1- Announcing present research descriptively and/or purposively’

  39. Language Focus: ‘Move 3 Step 1- Announcing present research descriptively and/or purposively’ • Google Scholar hits for some Move 3 Step 1 expression obtained in May 2012

  40. Language Focus: ‘Move 3 Step 2- Presenting research questions or hypotheses’ • Listing research questions

  41. Language Focus: ‘Move 3 Step 5- Announcing principal outcomes’

  42. Language Focus: ‘Move 3 Step 6- Stating the values of the present research’

  43. Language Focus: ‘Move 3 Step 7- Outlining the structure of the paper’

  44. Language Focus: ‘Move 3 Step 7- Outlining the structure of the paper’

  45. 7. Methods Sections • Peacock (2011) examined 288 RP Methods sections in published, data-driven papers from the fields of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Environmental Science, Business, Language and Linguistics, Law, and Public and Social administration (36 papers from each field). • He proposed the existence of seven ‘moves’ in Methods sections.