How Hits Happen or, What Was The Tipping Point? Dan Calladine - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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How Hits Happen or, What Was The Tipping Point? Dan Calladine

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  1. How Hits Happenor, What Was The Tipping Point?Dan Calladine

  2. How Hits Happen – or, What Was The Tipping Point? • The eternal question • Yes, you know it generated sales and hit the targets • But how did it happen?

  3. How Hits Happen – or, What Was The Tipping Point? • Advertising campaigns always start big • Social media campaigns are less easy to control • Often a story or idea will take a few days or weeks to take off • Different metrics are needed – mentions, authority and pass alongs, not impressions & clicks

  4. How Hits Happen – or, What Was The Tipping Point? • New tracking tools let us record these metrics • These tools show us how stories, promotions and ideas spread • To measure tipping points I’ve looked at two stories and a sales promotion • I’ve used the buzz tracking tool Radian 6 to trace the spark that ignited the story and took it to a wider audience • (Other buzz tracking tools are available)

  5. How Hits Happen – or, What Was The Tipping Point? • With big stories there is too much clutter to work through • Too many simultaneous promotions to identify the key spark • I’ve looked at stories that did not become hits until they had been in the public domain for a few days • 3 Stories • Spotify & Universal Music • Guinness is Good For You • Catch a Choo promotional campaign

  6. 1 – Spotify & Universal Music • Universal Music announced on 10th August that they made more revenue in Sweden from Spotify than iTunes

  7. Why did the story take 2 weeks to become a hit? • Only 25 mentions the day after the original story, including 22 on twitter Original story Search on ‘Spotify’ + ‘Universal’

  8. Example of a tweet on 11th August • This user had 2,000 followers • Yet the story then ran out of steam

  9. What happened on the 24th August? What happened? Search on ‘Spotify’ + ‘Universal’

  10. Mainstream media happened! • The Daily Telegraph featured the stat in a larger story about Spotify

  11. The follow up • This was then featured in other large traffic blogs and by multiple tweeters • Many referred to the Daily Telegraph as their source

  12. Lessons • A story or idea can disappear even it it’s strong • It a story about your brand has disappeared, try to make it part of a future news story or comment • Mainstream media is still very important as a source • When using twitter it’s not enough to have one person tweeting once – try to orchestrate a campaign across multiple users

  13. 2 – Guinness is good for you • In November 2003 some American academics wrote a research paper, arguing that Guinness genuinely was good for you • This suddenly became one of the most-viewed stories on the BBC Website in July 2009 – why?

  14. What happened to make this popular in 2009? What happened? Search on ‘Guinness’ + ‘Good For You’

  15. High Traffic Sites • The influential financial site Motley Fool featured the story on it’s UK site on 27th July, as an intro to a story on Diageo’s profit figures

  16. The link was then posted onto the Fodor’s Travel Forum • Hetismij, the poster, is a very well respected community member • He has started over 100 forum topics

  17. The link was then tweeted • In all there were 126 mentions of the story on 29th July, making the story one of the most-read on the BBC site

  18. Lessons • Something from the past can come back to haunt you or boost you • Stories spread well on sites with high authority • Similarly, active community members with high levels of respect and trust can spread stories well

  19. 3 – Jimmy Choo’s Trainer Hunt • On 9th April Jimmy Choo started a real-life game using twitter and Foursquare to launch a new pair of trainers • A representative moved around London, announcing when she entered a venue • If you caught her, you won the trainers

  20. But why did it only become a hit on the 27th April? What happened? Search on ‘Jimmy Choo’ +Foursquare

  21. In early – mid April it was featured in multiple fashion blogs

  22. Plus some tweets from fashion & marketing people

  23. But it was a post on Mashable that ignited the campaign

  24. Mashable created… • 1883 re-tweets • 1146 shares on Facebook • 1146 ‘Likes’ • Multiple subsequent blog posts • The story went mainstream

  25. The story also went offline – the ‘hit’ is now the story

  26. (She eventually got caught)

  27. Lessons • Seed story to relevant target markets • Also seed to larger media who may have interest in story • High traffic sources can yield the best response • Once it’s a hit, make that the story • Learn, and repeat

  28. Where to find me • dan.calladine@carat.com • http://twitter.com/dancall • http://digital-examples.blogspot.com • http://digital-stats.blogspot.com