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Generational Differences and the BHS

Generational Differences and the BHS

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Generational Differences and the BHS

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  1. Generational Differencesand the BHS By Chris Rimple with thanks to Chuck Greene and J.R. “Digger” MacDougall Last Updated July 16, 2008 Latest version available at http://www.chrisrimple.com

  2. About The Author • Barbershopper since 2003, former chapter and district Marketing VP, COTS instructor for Marketing & PR • Disciple of Chuck Greene and J.R. “Digger” MacDougall – focus on generational differences • 42, married, no kids, work in high tech – an example of our “target market” for recruiting • First barbershop experience at 18, but didn’t join for 20 years – plant the seed, it will grow • Website – http://www.chrisrimple.com • Email – chrisrimple@yahoo.com

  3. Instructions • There are two versions of the slide deck, identical except… • “Instructor” version includes instructor notes as additional slides • “Participant” version removes instructor notes • Instructor notes can be read verbatim if instructor is not familiar with the topic • “Participant” slides are ready for presentation • Start with black slide and continue after introducing instructor • Some slides use “build transitions” to display answers to questions, so instructors should watch the slide show to be familiar with them • “Instructor” version should be printed for participants, but not distributed until after presentation • Presenting the entire slide deck, including group discussions and “Singing Is Life” video, will generally require 2 hours • Please send any feedback to chrisrimple@yahoo.com

  4. Signs Are Obvious • Membership is 28,000…and decreasing • Average age is 61.9…and increasing • Average time a new member stays…is 1.8 years

  5. Instructor Notes Signs Are Obvious • Membership is 28,000 and decreasing • Now at lowest level since 1938 • Average age is 61.9 and increasing • Over the next 10 years, as a large number of members pass away, membership will plummet • Average time a new member stays is 1.8 years • Even with all our recruiting efforts, we can’t seem to keep the “new guys”

  6. The Future?

  7. Instructor Notes Is This The Future Of Barbershop? • [Show of hands] Who likes this picture?

  8. How Did This Happen?

  9. The World Changed

  10. Instructor Notes The World Changed – Five Things Have Happened • Suburban living and sprawl • Neighbors are unknown, less bonding with people who have similar values and interests • Vocational class balance • Shift from agricultural and manufacturing to knowledge and service industries has flattened traditional hierarchies • Speed up of everyday life • Work is no longer 9 to 5, overall free time significantly reduced • Electronic media • Speed and availability of information • Generational differences • Dramatic changes in values in the last 50 years

  11. Some Things Adapted…

  12. But Did We?

  13. Five Generations,Two Groups

  14. Instructor Notes Five Generations, Two Groups • There are 5 generations alive today • BHS members can be divided into 2 groups based on their values • Those that have a preference for Affiliation • Those that have a preference for Achievement • The two groups are very different in their needs and desires • Understanding these differences (and similarities) is critical to a chapter’s success • Both groups want relationships • Affiliation members build relationships based on history, shared experiences, and similarities • Achievement members build relationships with others who are driven to the same level of accomplishment • Groups are not specific to age, but age is usually a good guide • Older members may be Achievement, younger members may be Affiliation

  15. “Traditionals” • Age 60 and higher • Grew up in times of scarcity • Had more time than money • Expect hierarchical leadership • Affiliation is important

  16. Instructor Notes “Traditionals” • Age 60 and higher • Grew up in times of scarcity • Lived through the Great Depression and World Wars, or heard about them from parents • Banded together for survival • Believe in hard work, dedication, sacrifice • Had more time than money • Made their own entertainment: music, reading, building things, etc. • Sang everywhere and for every occasion – in movie theaters, in cars, on buses, and on the corner • Very frugal, penny-pinchers

  17. Instructor Notes “Traditionals” • Expect hierarchical leadership • Served in the military or have immediate family members who served • Strongly patriotic, believe in honor, duty before pleasure, adherence to rules • Respect for authority, troops follow without question, have been trained to conform • Position and titles are important, chain of command management style, information is controlled • Usually agricultural or manufacturing background, often a family-owned business • Most families had a working father and stay-at-home mother • Affiliation is important • Spending time with people of similar backgrounds and experiences • Strong focus on fraternal organizations (unions, lodges, etc.) • Strong focus on families, neighborhoods • Past-oriented and history-absorbed

  18. Boomers, GenX, GenY, Milleniums • Age 55 and less, particularly truefor those under 40 • Grew up in times of plenty • Had more money than time • Expect participatory leadership • Achievement is important

  19. Instructor Notes Baby Boomers, Generation X, Generation Y, and Milleniums • Age 55 and less, particularly true for those under 40 • Grew up in times of plenty • Live with 24 hour stores, ATMs, instant communication, etc. • Technology is an integral part of their lives • “Work smarter, not harder” • Had more money than time • Many entertainment choices: sports, television, video games, internet, etc. • Willing to spend money on things they want • Time is a critical resource, little left for “hobbies” • Want activities to have “meaning”

  20. Instructor Notes Baby Boomers, Generation X, Generation Y, and Milleniums • Expect participatory leadership • Usually work in a meritocracy, where everyone’s ideas and opinions have equal value • Less respect for authority – government and business corruption has taught them not to trust • Often risk-takers with strong entrepreneurial spirit • Usually knowledge worker or service background • Not “slackers” – actually more productive than earlier generations • Change employers easily, can have multiple careers in their lifetime • Multi-cultural, raised with equality, generally less religious, little patience for bigotry and intolerance, think globally • Usually both parents working, children more self-reliant • Achievement is important • Relationships are valuable, but within the context of accomplishments • Friendships have no geographic boundaries • Little patience for slow progress • Value individual rewards and ability to shape/contribute to the final product • What have you done for me lately?

  21. Identify TheExample Chapters

  22. Chapter #1 Has… • Generally older members • Frequent socializing • Singing quality not the highest priority • Difficulty retaining new members Affiliation

  23. Instructor Notes Chapter #1 Has… • Generally older members • Often, with average age increasing • Frequent socializing • Low riser discipline, lots of talking when not singing • Multiple breaks or members walk off risers as desired • Spouses and families are integrated into activities • Singing quality not the highest priority • Low audition standards • Members sing “for fun”, not for specific goals • No homework and no expectation of self-improvement • Music is learned on the risers • Low contest scores or not participating in contests at all • Often, Director is a member who was pressed into service and didn’t want the job

  24. Instructor Notes Chapter #1 Has… • Difficulty retaining new members • Have difficulty attracting new members • Most new members stay less than 2 years • [Show of hands] How many of you know a chapter like this one? • [Show of hands] What is the chapter type? (Choices are Affiliation and Achievement) • Affiliation

  25. Chapter #2 Has… • Generally younger members • Limited socializing • Singing quality is the highest priority • Low membership turnover Achievement

  26. Instructor Notes Chapter #2 Has… • Generally younger members • Often, with average age static • Limited socializing • High riser discipline, all eyes on Director when not singing • No breaks, or very short • Few activities in which spouses and families are encouraged to participate • Singing quality is the highest priority • High audition standards • “Good singing is fun” • Specific goals defined, with new goals set as prior goals achieved • Self-improvement expected, often required • Music is learned at home • Moderate to high contest scores, with frequent outside coaching to improve contest performance • Director is professional music educator or similar

  27. Instructor Notes Chapter #2 Has… • Low membership turnover • No difficulty attracting new members, may have a waiting list • Members only leave when forced to by life changes (school, work, etc.) • [Show of hands] How many of you know a chapter like this one? • [Show of hands] What is the chapter type? (Choices are Affiliation and Achievement) • Achievement

  28. What’s The Problem?

  29. Average Age Is 61.9 • What does this imply about our chapters? • How are chapters reacting? • Is the reaction working? This Is Our #1 Problem

  30. Instructor Notes Average Age Is 61.9 • What does this imply about our chapters? • Most chapters are already made up of Affiliation members • To serve their needs, most chapters should have an Affiliation focus • Most chapters aren’t structured to meet Achievement needs • How are chapters reacting? • Strong push to recruit new members • Focusing mostly on younger members, who are likely to be Achievement • As a result, probably neglecting the needs of Affiliation members

  31. Instructor Notes Average Age Is 61.9 • Is the reaction working? • [Show of hands] How many think it’s working? • For some chapters, it’s not • Achievement members aren’t satisfied by half-hearted attempts • Affiliation members aren’t happy about being pushed to sing better • As a result, members are voting with their feet (aka leaving) • Additionally, chapters are losing younger members to quartetting because • They get to sing high quality arrangements of songs with excellent entertainment potential • They get to participate in the design of routines, choreography, and other elements, and be rewarded for their creativity This is the #1 problem facing the BHS

  32. What Is Your Chapter Today? • Is your chapter Affiliation or Achievement? • How many of your members are Affiliation? Achievement? How do you know? • Are you meeting the needs of your members?

  33. Instructor Notes What Is Your Chapter Today? • [Show of hands] Is your chapter Affiliation or Achievement? • Most chapters are Affiliation chapters, but try to portray themselves as Achievement chapters • Ask yourself these questions • What are your performance and contest goals? • How hard are you willing to work to reach them? • Are you doing it, or just talking about it? • How many of your members are Affiliation? Achievement? How do you know? • Are you meeting the needs of your members? • Are you sacrificing the needs of Affiliation members to attract Achievement members? • Are you truly meeting the needs of the prospective members you’re recruiting?

  34. Group Discussion If a chapter focuses on bothAffiliation and Achievement,what happens?

  35. Instructor Notes [Group Discussion – 10 minutes to answer these questions at participants’ tables] • If a chapter focuses on both Affiliation and Achievement, what happens? • If there is a conflict, how is it resolved by chapter leaders, and members themselves?

  36. What Makes A “Good” Chapter?

  37. Instructor Notes What Makes A “Good” Chapter? • Many chapters are struggling to determine their “identity” • The following slides provide some ideas to better meet the needs of Affiliation and Achievement members

  38. 7 Deal Breakers Of the 13 characteristics that individuals look for when considering a group or activity, 7 are “deal breakers” and must be present • Opportunity for creativity • Opportunity for skill, talent, and knowledge growth • Upbeat ambiance • Highly-efficient return on investment (of time, energy, money, etc.) • Astute leaders • Participative leadership • Individuals are sought out for their talents

  39. Affiliation Chapter • Rehearsals • Performances • Contests • Membership • Families

  40. Instructor Notes Some of the properties of a “good” Affiliation chapter are… • Rehearsals • Loosely structured, plenty of breaks, chatter, humor, etc. • Frequent opportunities for socializing and interacting • Regular visits to other chapters for rehearsals • Lots of variety: chorus time, quartet activities, individual recognition, announcements, etc. • Little attention to singing quality – very inclusive, all about “fun” singing • Little pressure to improve and no expectation of individual learning outside rehearsals • Music is learned during rehearsal, generally on the risers • Frequent introduction of new music, rarely does a song achieve “perfection” before it’s replaced • Director is likely a retired musician or similar Affiliation-motivated person with basic music skills; a “heroic leader” may be too demanding and fail in this role • Performances • Low pressure, primarily for audiences without high expectations • Frequent fun opportunities to sing – holiday carols, singing valentines, arts in the parks, etc. • Most performances are free – senior citizen facilities, schools, churches, etc. • Paid performances are low key – cabarets, daytime events, a “gathering of friends” • Limited chorus repertoire, reliance on emcee and chapter quartets to fill time • Many performances with other groups – church choirs, college a cappella singers, etc.

  41. Instructor Notes Some of the properties of a “good” Affiliation chapter are… • Contests • Usually no participation in contests, except as hosts; if participating, often for evaluation only • Membership • Portray the chapter as primarily social • Focus on interest in singing, not ability • Look for men with similar desires/values • At senior homes, churches, fraternal organizations, youth organizations, etc. • In taverns and other locations where men congregate socially, particularly karaoke bars • In softball leagues, bowling leagues, etc. • In college fraternities, university clubs (chess, gamers, computers), etc. • Very limited audition standards or no auditions at all • Dues are low and chapter costs are intentionally kept low • Existing members are genuinely happy to have new members join, welcome them openly, and integrate them quickly

  42. Instructor Notes Some of the properties of a “good” Affiliation chapter are… • Families • Frequent non-singing social activities outside rehearsals, with family participation • Encourage spouses and families to attend rehearsals, develop a ladies auxiliary, etc. • When we talk about the differences between Affiliation and Achievement, listeners believe we mean "old men" and "young men". But there are some Affiliation young men out there, we're just not recruiting where they can be found. If an Affiliation chapter wants to maximize the return on their marketing dollars, while also developing "channels" through which new members can be recruited, they would do well to focus their dollars AND their performances on the audiences identified above. That doesn't just mean singing at the local college student union building, it means doing joint shows with the college a cappella singers AT the college, singing a song or two WITH the church choir AT the church, and so on.

  43. Achievement Chapter • Rehearsals • Performances • Contests • Membership • Families

  44. Instructor Notes Some of the properties of a “good” Achievement chapter are… • Rehearsals • Very focused, few or no breaks, exceptional riser discipline, etc. • Socializing limited to before and after rehearsal • Infrequent or no visits to other chapters for rehearsals • Structured agenda, activities defined to achieve goals, no announcements • High attention to singing quality – frequent recording, measuring progress, etc. • Requirements to improve individual singing quality and to learn outside rehearsals • Structured introduction of new music, with part recordings, section rehearsals, etc. • Music is learned outside rehearsals • New music is introduced as needed to achieve goals, never without a purpose • Repertoire is broad, with many songs written after 1960, and may include non-barbershop music • Director is likely a professional music educator or similar Achievement-motivated person with excellent adult education skills; a “heroic leader” may be unwilling to collaborate and may fail in this role

  45. Instructor Notes Some of the properties of a “good” Achievement chapter are… • Performances • Few public performances • Few or no free performances – focus is on audiences with high expectations • Paid performances are very high in quality and entertainment value • Broad chorus repertoire, but all songs at highest quality • Chapter quartets are also of high quality • Rarely perform with other groups, except where relationships are important • Contests • Participate regularly, usually annually • Use contest scores as a measurement of quality • Rarely host, since it interferes with contest focus

  46. Instructor Notes Some of the properties of a “good” Achievement chapter are… • Membership • Portray the chapter as primarily goal-oriented • Highlight the chapter’s attention to product quality, past achievements, future goals • Focus on singing ability, men with a strong desire to sing well, and that care about accomplishment • Look for men with similar desires/values • In university music programs • Among the members of orchestras and professional musical groups • Among the members of garage bands, singer-songwriters, and other modern musical groups • In the leadership ranks of other non-profit organizations • Among high achievers in business, sports, and other activities • Men with "Type A" personalities • Extensive auditions • Dues are high to cover coaching and other chapter costs • Members are encouraged to grow musically, administratively, etc. • Existing members are excited to have new members join and look forward to their contributions

  47. Instructor Notes Some of the properties of a “good” Achievement chapter are… • Families • Infrequent or no organized non-singing social activities outside rehearsals • Spouses and families are generally not participating in chapter activities • If an Achievement chapter wants to maximize the return on their marketing dollars, while also developing "channels" through which new members can be recruited, they would do well to focus their dollars AND their performances on the audiences identified above. Go after the men who are already singing, or have a dedication to music, or have the Achievement mentality and can learn to sing.

  48. GoodAffiliation chaptersAND goodAchievement chaptersare EQUALLY valuableBOTH are necessaryto meet the needsof BHS members