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Making Inferences Reading between the lines. 0. Authors vs. Readers. Authors Imply, Readers Infer. Authors make implications that readers have to infer. What do I mean by these statements?

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authors vs readers

0

Authors vs. Readers
  • Authors Imply, Readers Infer.
  • Authors make implications that readers have to infer.
  • What do I mean by these statements?
  • Good Readers are Detectives who are always looking out for clues to help them better understand stories and pictures.
speculating making inferences
SPECULATING/MAKING INFERENCES

An INFERENCE is an idea that is suggested by the facts or details in a passage

making inferences
MAKING INFERENCES
  • Read this very brief passage, followed by a multiple-choice question
  • Pete’s words PROBABLY indicate that
    • A. Pete doesn’t like Jennifer.
    • B. Pete doesn’t like to stay with a baby-sitter.
    • C. Pete doesn’t like bananas.
    • D. Pete doesn’t like to eat alone.
authors do not explain everything in a story
Authors do not explain everythingin a story.
  • Readers use story clues.
    • They use details about what they’ve read to make an inference.
  • Readers use their own personal experience.
    • They make “text to self” connections.
  • Readers use prior knowledge.
    • They make “text to text” connections.

The combination of these strategies allow readers

  • to make a inferences (reasonable guesses) about characters and events.
what kind of person is jake
What kind of person is Jake?
  • Jake stood on the riverbank. He cast his fishing rod into the deep water. He had been trying to catch a fish for many hours. Alex and Zach laughed as they watched Jake throw the line into the water one more time.
how do you think a lex and zach feel about jake s efforts to catch a fish
How do you think Alex and Zach feel about Jake’s efforts to catch a fish?
  • Jake stood on the riverbank. He cast his fishing rod into the deep water. He had been trying to catch a fish for many hours. Alex and Zach laughed as they watched Jake throw the line into the water one more time.
slide9

How do you think Jim feels?

  • The bus driver pulled out of the station. Jim’s heart beat fast. He had never traveled alone. He waved good-bye to his grandparents. “The bus will be in Tucson in two hours,” Jim told himself. He checked his watch. Jim pictured his father waiting for the bus in Tucson. “Two hours will be over in no time,” Jim said.
what personal experience or prior knowledge helped you figure out how jim feels
What personal experience or prior knowledge helped you figure out how Jim feels?
  • The bus driver pulled out of the station. Jim’s heart beat fast. He had never traveled alone. He waved good-bye to his grandparents. “The bus will be in Tucson in two hours,” Jim told himself. He checked his watch. Jim pictured his father waiting for the bus in Tucson. “Two hours will be over in no time,” Jim said.
three strategies connections you can use to make inferences
Three strategies (connections) you can use to make INFERENCES:
  • Story Clues
  • Personal Experience
    • Text to Self
  • Prior Knowledge
    • Text to Text
what inference can we make about this woman
What inference can we make about this woman?
  • The woman waited nervously in line. When the counter was empty, she carefully unloaded her items from her cart. Lines creased her forehead as if to show the calculations ringing up in her head. Finally, the cashier began ringing up the items as the woman clutched her purse.