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Animal Adaptations
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Animal Adaptations

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  1. Camouflage Animal Adaptations Continue 

  2. Camouflage • The ability to hide in your habitat or surroundings. • A special adaptation that many animals have to help them survive. • Many colors, patterns, and shapes that animals have are types of camouflage. Continue 

  3. Types of Camouflage • Color Changers • Mimicry • Counter Shading • Disruptive Coloration • Test Your Knowledge!

  4. Color Changers • Some animals’ fur or skin is the same color as its surroundings. • What happens if the surroundings change? • Some animals’ fur or skin can change color to match its environment. Continue 

  5. Examples of Color Changers Sacramento Zoo 2006 A Chameleon can change its color to match its surroundings very quickly. Continue 

  6. Examples of Color Changers A Polar Bear is hard to spot in the white snow. When the snow melts, the Polar Bear sheds his white fur and grows brown fur to match the tundra. Continue  Sacramento Zoo 2006

  7. Mimicry • Some animals have markings that make them look like other animals that may be dangerous. • Some animals look like things in their environment. • Bold colors, patterns or shapes can be warning signals to potential predators. Continue 

  8. Examples of Mimicry Sacramento Zoo 2006 Sacramento Zoo 2006 The Coral King Snake is poisonous. The Scarlet King Snake is not poisonous – but most predators will leave it alone. Continue 

  9. Examples of Mimicry Sacramento Zoo 2006 Sacramento Zoo 2006 The Monarch Butterfly is very toxic and tastes bad. The Viceroy Butterfly looks like the Monarch Butterfly. Most birds will leave it alone. Continue 

  10. Counter Shading • When an animal is counter-shaded, the upper part of its body (back) is dark and the underpart (belly) is lighter in color. • Many creatures that live in the water are counter-shaded. • Many tree-dwelling creatures are counter-shaded as well.  Continue 

  11. Examples of Counter Shading Microsoft ClipArt Gallery 2004 A Squirrel’s belly is light to help it blend in with the light coming through the trees. This helps it hide from predators below. A Squirrel’s back is darker to help hide it from predators above. The darker color allows it to blend in with the trees and the ground below. Continue 

  12. Examples of Counter Shading Microsoft ClipArt Gallery 2004 When looking up from the bottom of the ocean, a Shark is hard to see because of its light colored belly. When looking down from the top of the water, a Shark is hard to see because its dark back blends with the ocean floor below. Continue 

  13. Disruptive Coloration • Disruptive coloration is a way of confusing the eye.  • It breaks up the solid outline of an animal’s body so that it is harder to see and recognize.  Continue 

  14. Examples of Disruptive Coloration The Sumatran Tiger has stripes that help it hide among the tall grasses and slender trees. So that it’s hard to tell what is grass and what is Tiger!  Sacramento Zoo 2006 Continue 

  15. Examples of Disruptive Coloration Sacramento Zoo 2006 In a heard of Zebras, it is hard to tell where one Zebra starts and the other one ends. This type of disruptive coloration can be confusing to predators. Continue 

  16. Identify the Camouflage • Color Changer • Mimicry • Counter Shading • Disruptive Coloration Sacramento Zoo 2006

  17. Correct!!! • Disruptive Coloration • Jaguars hunt among the leaves, broken light and shade of low tree branches. His spots help him hide in his environment. Continue 

  18. Oops! • Try Again!

  19. Identify the Camouflage • Color Changer • Mimicry • Counter Shading • Disruptive Coloration Sacramento Zoo 2006

  20. Correct!!! • Color Changers • An • Octopus can change its color almost instantly when threatened by a predator. Click Here to Watch a Video of an Octopus Changing Colors!! Continue  After viewing this video, click the “Back” button in your browser to return to this slide show

  21. Oops! Try Again!

  22. Identify the Camouflage • Color Changer • Mimicry • Counter Shading • Disruptive Coloration Microsoft ClipArt Gallery 2004

  23. Oops! Try Again!

  24. Correct!!! Counter Shading Penguins have light colored bellies to help them blend in with the ice on the top of the water. The Penguin’s dark back helps him blend in with the dark ocean floor below. Continue 

  25. Identify the Camouflage • Color Changer • Mimicry • Counter Shading • Disruptive Coloration

  26. Oops! Try Again!

  27. Correct!!! Mimicry This Moth Caterpillar mimics a snake. This helps tell predators to stay away. Continue 

  28. Great Job! • Visit these websites for more information on animal adaptations and camouflage: • HowStuffWorks: How Animal Camouflage Works • EcoKids: Play & Learn: Animal Adaptations • Sacramento Zoo: E-Feature - Camouflage • Play Find the Critter at Longhorn Cattle.com After viewing these sites, click the “Back” button in your browser to return to this slide show Continue 

  29. References • Council for Environmental Education. (2005). ProjectWild K-12 Curriculum & Activity Guide. Houston, TX: Council for Environmental Education. • The Sacramento Zoo: E:Feature – Critter Camouflage. (2006). Retrieved from: http://www.saczoo.com/3_kids/20_camouflage/camouflage_intro.htm November 4, 2006. Continue 

  30. Photography Credits • Microsoft ClipArt Gallery. (2004). Retrieved from http://office.microsoft.com/clipart/default.aspx?lc=en-us on November 4, 2006. • Sacramento Zoo: E:Feature – Critter Camouflage. (2006). Retrieved from: http://www.saczoo.com/3_kids/20_camouflage/camouflage_intro.htm November 4, 2006. • Wetterer, J. (1992). “Moth Caterpillar.” Retrieved from http://www.thewildones.org/Animals/camo.html on November 4, 2006. Continue 