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Introduction to Sediment Sampling Siletz, Coquille, Umatilla and Cowlitz Tribes Siletz, OR PowerPoint Presentation
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Introduction to Sediment Sampling Siletz, Coquille, Umatilla and Cowlitz Tribes Siletz, OR May 20 – 23, 2013. U.S. Geological Survey TEchnical training in Support of Native American Relations (TESNAR) - 2013. Mark Uhrich , USGS, Portland, OR ( mauhrich@usgs.gov )

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slide1
Introduction to Sediment Sampling

Siletz, Coquille,

Umatilla and Cowlitz

Tribes

Siletz, OR

May 20 – 23, 2013

U.S. Geological Survey

TEchnical training in Support of Native American Relations (TESNAR) - 2013

Mark Uhrich, USGS, Portland, OR (mauhrich@usgs.gov)

Glen Hess, USGS, Portland, OR (gwhess@usgs.gov)

MacKenzie Keith, USGS, Portland, OR (mkeith@usgs.gov)

fluvial sediment data needs in the u s
Fluvial-Sediment Data Needs in the U.S.
  • Historical: Maintenance of reservoirs, channels, and hydraulic structures/bridge piers
  • Today’s needs include but are not limited to:

- Legal requirements – TMDL’s

-Salmon recovery on Tribal Lands (Siletz and Klamath Basins,

White Salmon & Elwha River, WA) (Dam decommission and removal)

- Contaminated sediment management

- Best Management Practice (BMP) Evaluations; Env-Imp-Stat

- Fire-burn hydrology/sedimentology

- Stream restoration/geomorphic assessments

- Physical-biotic interactions

- Global carbon budget

- Sand budget and bar maintenance

- Productivity of agricultural lands

-

slide4

*

  • Built in 1909 for hydropower
  • Head = 7 Meters
  • Abandoned for power generation in 1960’s
  • Blocked American shad and striped bass
  • from reaching historic spawning grounds
  • Environmental benefits of dam removal
  • justified demolition by Federal Government
and in our backyard the marmot dam breach sandy river or october 19 2007
And in our backyard-the Marmot Dam BreachSandy River, OR, October 19, 2007

955,000 yd3 stored behind reservoir

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

458,000 yd3 released by March 2008 (45%)

and just started the elwha river dam removal olympic national park wa september 17 2011
And just started- the Elwha River Dam RemovalOlympic National Park, WA September 17, 2011

Largest removal in U.S. history

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

70 miles of river and tributaries will be restored -brings cultural,

spiritual and economic healing to the

Lower Elwha Klallum Tribe

slide9

NF Toutle

Station

slide13

MSH background and NF Toutle Sed Volumes

  • Eruption of May 18, 1980 deposited over
  • 3 billion yd3of sediment in NF Toutle valley
  • SRS designed to trap 250 million yd3 until 2035, so far trapped over 105 million yd3- yet sediment has filled to level of spillway
  • Issues: Cowlitz/Columbia R sedimentation, flooding hazards, navigation for shipping commerce, salmon recovery/hatchery
  • NF Toutle SSLs in million tons and total Q in 1000 cfs (avg Q 786 cfs):
  • 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
  • SSL 7.0 4.0 1.5 1.2 2.2 2.2
  • Q 275 283 234 320 386 355
slide14

Sediment Retention Structure - SRS

Raising spillway 7 feet,

Sept 2012

Spillway

sediment damages are costly
Sediment Damages are Costly
  • Physical, Chemical, and Biological Sediment Damages in North America Total >$20-$50 Billion*Annually (Most in the USA; AGU-EOS, 10/5/2004; Science, V.267, pp. 1117-11123; Osterkamp et al. 1998)
  • Given a 1% Reduction in Damages Through Better Resource Management, a Continental Sediment Monitoring Program WouldPay for Itself at least 40 TimesOver
scope of course
Scope of course

Instruction and field practice of USGS methods for the safe collection of quality-assured fluvial-sediment data:

  • streamflow measurement
  • suspended-sediment sampling
  • bedload sampling
scope of course cont
Scope of course (cont)

As underpinnings for this we provide instruction on:

  • Streamflow is everything- must start here
  • Basic fluvial sediment concepts
  • Sediment-sampling equipment & deployment
  • Overview of computational methods
  • Overview of sediment-surrogate technologies
  • Bedload Sampling
primary assumption
Primary Assumption
  • For instructional purposes, our assumed goal is to collect sufficient data to compute sediment loads and store the data in the USGS National Water Information System.
  • In reality, reasons for collecting sediment data may be quite different – regardless, the following factors remain of primary importance:
    • Consistency
    • Reliability
    • Comparability
    • Database integrity
upon departure students should
Upon Departure, Students Should:
  • Understand basic streamflow and fluvial-sediment concepts
  • Understand and appreciate the value of a representative sample and consistent methods
  • Be familiar with more common tools for collecting sediment data, and their limitations
  • Be able to safely collect representative
    • streamflow
    • suspended-sediment samples isokinetically
    • bedload samples
  • Understand basic sediment load calculations
what we will not cover
What we will not cover:
  • Database considerations (such as the USGS National Water Information System; NWIS)
  • Sediment lab instrumentation and techniques
  • Network design and developing a sediment monitoring program
  • Bed-material and pebble-count sampling
  • Producing a suspended-sediment and bedload record
    • Best to attend the USGS Sediment Data-Collection

Techniques class, in Castle Rock, WA- March 2014

for more detail on the above

points to remember
Points to remember…
  • Historical sediment needs- channel & reservoir
  • Todays needs- more complex; dam removals, restoration, TMDLs, contaminated sediment, etc
  • Sediment damages are more expensive than establishing a monitoring network
  • Be consistent with your methods and database
  • Collect a representative sample for your site
  • Data should be reliable and comparable site-to-site
slide25

One of our class sampling

sites is the Siletz River on Hwy 229

slide27

D-74 sampler

4-wheel crane setup on bridge with B-reel and two counter weights