Rhode Island Alternate Assessment Fall Conference 2010 Science Basics - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

lixue
rhode island alternate assessment fall conference 2010 science basics n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Rhode Island Alternate Assessment Fall Conference 2010 Science Basics PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Rhode Island Alternate Assessment Fall Conference 2010 Science Basics

play fullscreen
1 / 73
Download Presentation
132 Views
Download Presentation

Rhode Island Alternate Assessment Fall Conference 2010 Science Basics

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Rhode IslandAlternate AssessmentFall Conference 2010Science Basics

  2. Agenda for Science Foundations of Science RIAA Science Model Review of the RIAA Manual Science Instruction Samples Grade Level Work How to Plan for RIAA Science The RIAA Documentation Requirements and Forms

  3. Science = INQUIRY + KNOWLEDGE

  4. RIAA Science • Assessed in grades 4, 8, and 11 • 2 Entries • Inquiry - Students are assessed on one inquiry construct throughout the year. • Knowledge – students are assessed on one AAGSE from each science domain. • Includes Structured Performance Tasks (SPT) • Three collection periods -1 collection period for each science domain - Life Science - Earth Space Science - Physical Science

  5. Foundations of Science:INQUIRY CONSTRUCTS = SCIENCE INVESTIGATION A science investigation is an unit of study in science that uses the science inquiry constructs of: *Observation and Questioning *Planning *Conducting *Analyzing


  6. Science Entry #1: Inquiry • Inquiry constructs are assigned by grade. • Teacher chooses the inquiry construct that best matches a student’s strengths and needs. • Once an inquiry construct is chosen, data is taken on this one construct in each of the three collection periods. • Science domains may be assessed in any order. The Inquiry Entry demonstrates student’s inquiry skills: • applied within a LS investigation (1 collection period) • applied within an ESS investigation (1 collection period) • applied within a PS investigation (1 collection period)

  7. RIAA Inquiry Constructs

  8. Grade 4Inquiry Construct Teacher chooses OBSERVE/QUESTION Make and describe observations in order to ask questions, and/or make predictions as related to the science investigation.

  9. Grade 4Inquiry Construct Teacher chooses CONDUCTING Follow procedures, using equipment or measurement devices accurately as appropriate, for collecting and/or recording qualitative or quantitative data.

  10. Grade 8Inquiry Construct Teacher chooses PLANNING Identify information/evidence that needs to be collected and/or tool to be used in order to answer a question and/or check a prediction.

  11. Grade 8Inquiry Construct Teacher chooses CONDUCTING Use data to summarize results.

  12. Grade 11Inquiry Construct Teacher chooses CONDUCTING Use accepted methods of organizing, representing and/or manipulating data.

  13. Grade 11Inquiry Construct Teacher chooses ANALYZING Use evidence to support and/or justify interpretations and/or conclusions or explain how the evidence refutes the hypothesis.

  14. Challenge #1: Which description best matches Grade 4 Inquiry Construct: Conducting? • Jenny was assessed on her ability to identify the tools needed for her life science investigation. She carefully reviewed the science tools, and accurately identified the three tools (thermometer, ruler, rain gauge) for her investigation of plant growth (100% accurate). Jenny required a tap prompt to select the rain gauge. Her independence was 66%. She then listed these tools on her lab report which she will use in her experiment. • Jenny followed a three step procedure in her life science investigation. The steps were: 1- gather the tools; 2- use the tools to measure air temperature; plant growth; amount of rain; 3- record data on the recording sheet. Jenny was accurate in 2/3 steps (66%). She needed verbal prompting to record her data. She was independent in the other two steps (66%).

  15. Challenge #2: Which description best matches Grade 8 Inquiry Construct: Planning ? • The class developed the hypothesis “Heavy cars move faster” for their physical science investigation. Jenny needed to decide what data needed to be recorded when she conducted the experiment. Jenny accurately and independently named “weight of car” and “time to complete the test track” and developed a recording sheet with this information included. She was 100% independent and 100% accurate in identifying the data. • Jenny recorded the weight of each car and time for each test track run. There were six cars of different weight used for her experiment. When the experiment was complete, Jenny needed to divide the cars into two categories (heavy and light) and compute the average weight and time for each category . Jenny was accurate in computing the average weight but not the average time resulting in 50% accuracy. She needed verbal prompting to average both the weight and time (0% independent).

  16. Grade 11Inquiry Construct Teacher chooses CONDUCTING Use accepted methods of organizing, representing and/or manipulating data.

  17. Challenge #3: Which description best matches Grade 11 Inquiry Construct: Conducting? • Jenny followed a three step procedure in her life science investigation. The steps were: 1- gather the tools; 2- use the tools to measure air temperature; plant growth; amount of rain; 3- record data on the recording sheet. Jenny was accurate in completing 2/3 steps (66%). She needed verbal prompting to record her data. She was independent in completing the other two steps (66%). • Jenny recorded the weight of each car and time for each test track run. There were six cars of different weights used for her experiment. Jenny was evaluated on how accurately and independently she recorded the data (placing the correct numbers in the correct place on her Experiment Data Chart). Jenny was accurate in representing data 8/12 times, resulting in 75% accuracy. She needed a point prompt to record data 6/12 times (50% independent).

  18. Data Matches Description • Describe the inquiry construct clearly • Convey how student was assessed • Ensure that description matches data

  19. Inquiry Description Matches Data Collection: Android Overview of investigation: Android conducted a scientific investigation on the external features of plants. After viewing a number of plant photographs, the class developed a hypothesis: All plants are green. The class went on a nature hike to collect specimens of plants for their investigation. Android used a magnifying glass and color chart to document color(s) of five plants. Android recorded his observations on a science data chart and analyzed his results after the experiment to decide if his hypothesis was correct.

  20. Inquiry Description Matches Data Collection: Android Android was assessed on two aspects of analyzing: (1) identifying whether his hypothesis was correct/incorrect and (2) locating the data from his chart that supported his conclusion. Android accurately identified that his hypothesis was incorrect and cited the three plants on his chart that were observed with red and yellow colors. His accuracy was 100%. He independently identified his hypothesis was incorrect, but needed verbal prompts to locate the data on his chart to support his conclusion (50% independence).

  21. Possible Data Collection for Android: Grade 11: Analyzing

  22. Example: Data does not match Inquiry Construct Yon was assessed on two aspects of analyzing: (1) identifying whether his hypothesis was correct/incorrect and (2) locating the data from his chart that supported his conclusion. Yon accurately identified that plant #3 had red colors and plant #5 had yellow colors. His accuracy was 100%. He needed verbal prompts to locate the where to place his observational data on his chart (0% independence).

  23. Challenge # 4: Identify the Inquiry Construct and Grade Overview of investigation Abdel’s class conducted a scientific investigation on the states of matter (solid, liquid, gas). The students observed items in different states and labeled them with solid, liquid or gas. The class developed the research question “Can water be a solid, liquid, and gas?” The class observed water in the three states and recorded their observations on a science data chart. The students then used their chart to answer their research question.

  24. Challenge #4: Identify the Inquiry Construct and Grade Abdel completed three defined observations of the water . At each observation he was assessed on his ability to (1) describe what he observed (choosing the state of matter) and (2) record the data on his chart, providing six total points of assessment. Abdel was accurate in describing what he observed for two observations and accurate in placing his data on his chart for all three observations (5/6=83% Accuracy). Abdel needed verbal prompts for both describing observations and recording data (0% independence).

  25. Possible Data Collection for Abdel: Grade 4: Conducting

  26. Challenge #5: Identify the Inquiry Construct and Grade Overview of investigation The class conducted an investigation that focused on concepts of living and non-living things. The students researched the characteristics of living things (grow, move, reproduce), and non-living things by looking on the internet. The students observed videos of objects on a website and discussed the characteristics they observed. They planned the objects they would test and developed a chart to capture their findings. Students used manipulative cards and then converted these into a Lab Report Data sheet. After the experiment, the students analyzed their findings and discussed their reasoning for charting the object as "living" or "non-living". After completing the experiment, the students concluded if their hypothesis was correct or incorrect by reviewing their hypothesis chart and marking whether their hypothesis was correct or incorrect based on their evidence.

  27. John watched two videos of very active common living animals (A lion and a dog). John needed to describe what he observed using simple signs associated with MJ symbols. He had a field of 4 symbols to choose from to describe what he observed (move, breathe, swim, shop). John was given two opportunities to describe what he observed in the lion and dog videos. He then chose two observations he wanted to include in his hypothesis. And decided his hypothesis was “All animals move and breathe.” John was accurate in his observation in 75% of his opportunities (3/4). John needed 3 physical prompts and 1 verbal prompts to make and describe his observations, giving 0% independence. Challenge # 5: Identify the Inquiry Construct and Grade

  28. Possible Data Collection for John

  29. Inquiry Student Work Components of Student Work • Must match the Inquiry Construct selected • Accuracy • Independence • Work Product Label • Must be graded for Accuracy and LOA

  30. Student Work Product Label

  31. Does the description of conducting match the student work? Description: Emma was assessed on her ability to use the magnet wand correctly to test each of the 6 objects. She accurately used the wand in testing 6 out of 6 objects for an accuracy score of 100%.

  32. Does the description match the student work?

  33. Challenge # 6: Does the description match the student work? Android was assessed on two aspects of analyzing: (1) identifying whether his hypothesis was correct/incorrect and (2) locating the data from his chart that supported his conclusion. Android was accurate in indicating his hypothesis was incorrect and accurately identified the data that supported his conclusion by circling it on his chart. His accuracy was 100%. He independently indicated his hypothesis was incorrect but needed verbal prompts to circle the observational data that supported his conclusion (50% independence).

  34. AA V Ind

  35. Challenge # 7: Does the description match the student work? Description of Grade 8 Planning: Zachary was assessed on identifying the tools needed to conduct the experiment related to weather. Zachary identified a thermometer and a rain gauge as the 2 tools needed for this experiment. He was 100% accurate and needed 50% physical prompt to complete this task.

  36. Student Work Product

  37. Knowledge Entry • Three Science Domains • Life Science (LS) • Earth and Space Science (ESS) • Physical Science (PS)

  38. Knowledge Entry Select Science AAGSEs that match student strengths and needs

  39. Knowledge Entry AAGSE# LS 1.1.1 Description: Distinguish between living and non-living organisms • Jane was presented with two organisms (rock and kitten). Jane was evaluated on whether she correctly distinguished (by touching) the living organism. Jane touched both the living and non-living organism. She was then was asked to “touch the living organism”. • This process was then repeated with two additional organisms (pencil, kitten).

  40. Does the description match the AAGSE? Data was taken on the Jane's performance in touching the requested organism during two trials. Jane was accurate in 1 out of 2 trials in touching the living organism resulting in 50% accuracy. Jane was independent in touching the living organism in 50% of her trials (1 out of 2 trials), but needed physical assistance for 1 trial.

  41. Possible Data Collection for Jane

  42. Challenge # 8: Does the description match the AAGSE? AAGSE: PS 1.1.2b Describe physical changes. • The class is conducting a science investigation on physical changes that occur to paper as part of an investigation on chromatography, describing what happens to paper when it is exposed to colored liquids.

  43. Challenge # 8: Does the description match the AAGSE? • Fredrik identified the procedures needed for this experiment. He identified five of the six procedures correctly, yielding an accuracy level of 83%. He was independent in listing all procedures (100% independent).

  44. Science SPT • Student will demonstrate the concept within a science investigation, which includes observing/questioning, planning, conducting and analyzing.

  45. Four Inquiry Constructs Observing/Questioning: • describes learning more about the subject or observing to gain knowledge to prepare a research question or hypothesis

  46. Four Inquiry Constructs Planning: • describes preparing for the investigation which might include gathering materials, developing a data collection sheet, deciding how to conduct the investigation (listing the procedures). The planning should be relevant to planning the science investigation. Examples of planning that are not related to science: • Planning whom to work with or what to write with • Planning the party after the science investigation • Choosing what color bin to put the science tools in

  47. Four Inquiry Constructs Conducting: • describes implementing the investigation. This might involve following procedures to take data; recording data, or observing someone conduct experiments that are dangerous for students to implement. • Some investigations might involve the internet/book investigation in subjects that cannot be investigated within school at one point in time (e.g. ESS1.2.13c Describe each season)

  48. Four Inquiry Constructs Analyzing • Typically this inquiry construct occurs after the experiment. It involves looking at the data and making decisions beyond just reading the data. Data is reviewed to answer the research question or confirm a hypothesis.

  49. Connection to SPT:Challenge # 9: Locate the inquiry constructs within the description below: Android conducted a scientific investigation on the external features of plants. After viewing a number of plant photographs, the class developed a hypothesis: All plants are green. Android used a magnifying glass and color chart to document color(s) of five plants. Android recorded his observations on a science data chart. He analyzed his results and determined that his hypothesis was incorrect because some plants were red or yellow.

  50. Connection to SPTChallenge # 10: Locate the inquiry constructs within the description below: The class conducted an investigation that focused on concepts of living and non-living things. Students used manipulative cards and then converted these into a Lab Report Data sheet. After the experiment, the students analyzed their findings and discussed their reasoning for charting the object as "living" or "non-living". After completing the experiment, the students reviewed their hypothesis chart and concluded if their hypothesis was correct or incorrect based on their evidence.