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Today: Test Back Discussion The Cold War- Lecture – What was the Cold War? Document Inquiry – Who was to blame? EQ: Who is to blame for the Cold War – The Soviet Union or the United States? . Singing in the Rain Today? . WWII Ends.

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Singing in the Rain Today?


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    1. Today: • Test Back • Discussion • The Cold War- • Lecture – What was the Cold War? • Document Inquiry – Who was to blame? • EQ: Who is to blame for the Cold War – The Soviet Union or the United States? Singing in the Rain Today?

    2. WWII Ends • Germany is divided between East and West – West occupied by the U.S. and the East occupied by the Soviet Union • Europe begins to rebuild • Japan begins to rebuild • The United States and the Soviet Union emerge as the two greatest Super Powers – Fighting over influence and dominance around the world. • 3rd world – post-colonial, newly independent nations trying to find their way politically and economically.

    3. The Cold War • Usually dated 1947-1991 • Tensions between Western Block (United States and her allies) and the Eastern Block (Soviet Union and their allies) • Power struggle – The Soviet Union vs. The U.S. • Capitalism vs. Communism • Proxy Wars – Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan, (Greece, Latin America-Chile, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Cuba) • Arms Race – Nuclear Weapons • Space Race

    4. Happy Tuesday Friends! Today: • Nuclear Explosions • Finish Document Activity • Reflection • Discussion • Who is to blame? • What kind of sources help us best understand history? EQ: Who is to blame for the rising tensions that escalated into the Cold War.

    5. So what are we talking about? Nuclear Explosions- What do they look like? What do they do? Where have they happened?

    6. So who is to blame? In your groups review the documents from both sides of the conflict and decide – who is to blame for the escalating tensions and power struggles that resulted from the Cold War. REMEMBER: When SOURCING answer the following questions – What kind of document is it? (Speech, letter, diary) What is the purpose of this type of document (inform, persuade etc.) What are the motives of the writer? What do they want-stand to lose/gain?

    7. So who is to blame? In your groups review the documents from both sides of the conflict and decide – who is to blame for the escalating tensions and power struggles that resulted from the Cold War. REMEMBER: When SOURCING answer the following questions – What kind of document is it? (Speech, letter, diary) What is the purpose of this type of document (inform, persuade etc.) What are the motives of the writer? What do they want-stand to lose/gain?

    8. Reflection - What do you think? Who is to blame? Things to include: • Discuss the different perspectives represented – What do you think each document says? How could you twist it to make the opposite argument? • Comment of the reliability of the sources – Why are the sources you are using to support your argument (most) reliable? • Please use between 2 and 4 quotes as evidence. (feel free to use more)

    9. Block Day Yay! Today: • Discussion – Sources and Who is to blame • Lecture: The Cold War • Propaganda – Videos • Propaganda Document Activity

    10. Discussion In your groups discuss the perspective and reliability of each document – What do you believe about this document , what are you suspicious of. What kinds of documents do you find MOST useful in your quest to understand the past?

    11. Debrief – Who is to Blame? Who do you think is more to blame for the escalating tensions known as the Cold War? What do you see as the motives/desires of the Soviet Union? What do you see as the motives/desires of the United States?

    12. Cold War Key Terms and Abbreviations U.S.S.R = Soviet Union G.B. = Great Britain U.S. = United States Capitalism: Communism: coup d'état: Carrot vs. Stick: 38th Parallel:

    13. The Cold War 1947-1948 Greek Civil War – G.B. states she can no longer finance capitalist monarchy against communist fighters. Truman Doctrine – In response to G.B. backing out of Greece, U.S. adopts policy of containment – defense and foreign relations. Marshall Plan – Economic Assistance for those wishing to resist communism (Carrot vs. Stick) Czechoslovakia – USSR sponsors coup d'état. Violent nature shocks U.S. – Removes remaining political opposition to Marshall Plan in Congress. (public opposition remains) Berlin Blockade – Stalin blocks aid to West Germany. Leads to U.S., G.B., France, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand starting Berlin Airlift – Stalin backs down by 1949

    14. Cold War – 1949 NATO – North Atlantic Treaty (NAT) establishes North Atlantic Trade Organization (NATO). Original 12: The United States, Great Britain, Canada, Belgium, Denmark, France, Iceland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, and Portugal sign what is both a defense treaty and a trade treaty. Radio Free Europe – Political/Cultural Strategy against communism in Europe. Propaganda against communism and communist regimes. Chinese Civil War -  Mao Zedong's People's Liberation Army defeated Chiang Kai-shek's United States-backed Kuomintang (KMT) Nationalist Government in China, and the USSR creates an alliance with the new People's Republic of China. The KMT retreat to Taiwan.

    15. What is Propaganda? STUDY AND SUCCEED. FIDDLE AND FAIL! Propaganda are pictures, words, video, any type of media that attempts to play on the viewers’ values and emotions to promote an idea. What are some examples of propaganda that you see in this classroom? What are some examples of propaganda you see in your daily life? CWI WITH MS. ROSENBERG

    16. What works better for you – ‘positive’ propaganda or ‘negative’ propaganda? Does the context matter? YOU WIN FROM WITHIN! CWI WITH MS. ROSENBERG

    17. Happy Friday Friends! Today: • Reflection/Discussion Propaganda • Korean War notes • Korean War Activity • Notes on Cold War – Stalin’s death EQ: In the Cold War tensions - Who is to blame?

    18. Cold War Propaganda First watch the videos 1 and 2 • What is the central messages of the propaganda film? • What emotions and values does it focus on? Do you find this effective? Why or why not? Look at all of the images and answer the questions. When you are done answer the final reflection questions below. Consider both the films and the images • What do you see as the key differences between the Soviet and U.S. propaganda? • Why might these differences exist? (What is it like in the U.S. right now vs. what is it like in the Soviet Union? ) • What type of propaganda do you find most effective and why? (Give specific examples)

    19. The Korean War 1950-1953 Pre-1950 - North Korean Leader Kim Il-sung believed that he would be met with open arms in the South. Wanted to attack prior to 1950 , but Stalin urged him to wait until fighting had stopped in China. 1950 – Native Korean fighters return from China after the end of the Chinese Civil War. Stalin agrees to back a North Korean invasion of South Korea on the condition that Mao send assistance. U.S. and South Korean units unprepared for the attack. – N. Korean units push S. Korean units almost to the sea.

    20. Korean War Cont. • 1951 – U.S. backed by the United Nations intervenes, provides S. Korean with tanks, artillery, and troop support. Push troops back to the boarder with the U.S.S.R. Soviet intervention pushes fighting back around 38th parallel. • 1952 – Fighting continues with both sides backed by opposition forces. Remains around the 38th parallel. • 1953-1954 - No Peace is ever agreed upon. Korean Armistice Agreement is a cease fire that both sides agreed on.

    21. 1953-Stalin Dies Stalin dies in 1953- Stalin was the central power and influence in Soviet Politics His death has a dramatic effect on the Cold War and Soviet Society. Khrushchev Takes Power in USSR Process of De-Stalinization "Whether you like it or not, history is on our side. We will bury you“ – Kruschechev

    22. Reactions in the United States Eisenhower's secretary of state, John Foster Dulles institutes “New Look” Increase in Nuclear Weapons Production “Massive Retaliation” against ANY Soviet aggression CIA Interventions around the world – Iran/Guatemala (remove ‘leftist’ leaders, install friendly to the west dictators)

    23. In Europe Stalin’s death slightly relaxes tensions Communist Countries sign “Warsaw Pact” in 1955 – (Opposition to NATO) Mutual economic and military support between Soviet Union, East Germany, Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia , Poland, Romania and Hungary.