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Optimum range beef production is achieved only by matching the animal’s genetic potential to the nutritional environment PowerPoint Presentation
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Optimum range beef production is achieved only by matching the animal’s genetic potential to the nutritional environment - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Optimum range beef production is achieved only by matching the animal’s genetic potential to the nutritional environment . OPTIMAL RANGE/ANIMAL UTILIZATION.

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Optimum range beef production is achieved only by matching the animal’s genetic potential to the nutritional environment


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    1. Optimum range beef production is achieved only by matching the animal’s genetic potential to the nutritional environment.

    2. OPTIMALRANGE/ANIMAL UTILIZATION • “The most critical decision we make is when to change pastures. Too early, we leave valuable forage; too late, we have a detrimental impact on both livestock and rangeland sustainability”.

    3. BOVINEBUFFET • Healthy desert rangelands are diverse eco-systems • Availability of potential diet species varies depending on time of year, elevation and effective precipitation • Collectively provides a “nutritional buffet” • Animals, like people have different selection preferences

    4. Sources of Rangeland Nutrients • Grasses • Forbs • Browse

    5. GENERAL NUTRIENT CLASSIFICATION • Carbohydrates • Protein • Fats and Oils • Vitamins and Minerals • Water

    6. Plant factors affecting animal intake:Availability Preference QualityAnti grazing factors

    7. Animal factors affecting intake:breed sex body size ruminal capacity body condition digestibility supplementation rate of intake grazing time

    8. WHERE DOES THE FEED GO ? • Maintenance 70% to 80% • Lactation 6% to 8% • Gestation 18% to 20%

    9. CRITICAL NUTRIENT NEEDS;Fertility and Reproduction Growth Lactation

    10. Compounding Nutritional Issues • Toxicities • Deficiencies • Improper ratios (minerals) • Synergistic and antagonistic interactions

    11. Range Supplementation • Energy • Protein • Vitamins and Mineral

    12. Rifle vs Shotgun • Rifle is appropriate for “stationary targets” • Harvested feeds, composition not rapidly changing, design ration for specific performance • Shotgun is appropriate for “flying targets” • Rangeland feed composition may be constantly changing. Precipitation etc

    13. Specific Ammunition • What mix of pellets “supplements” is best suited to meet the animal’s immediate needs? • What delivery system works for you? • Can’t measure it, can’t manage it • Need to have current, accurate diet data

    14. Energy Supplementation • Energy must be supplemented on a daily basis • The amount fed determines whether supplementation or substitution occurs. If 10% or more of the diet is fed, then substitution occurs • Supplementation will impact grazing activities

    15. Protein Supplementation • May be supplemented as infrequently as once or twice per week • Nitrogen (protein) is recycled in the form of urea • Protein supplementation will improve the digestibility of low quality forage by as much as 10%

    16. Macro Mineral Nutrition in Grazing Ruminants • Calcium • Phosphorus • Sodium • Chloride • Magnesium • Potassium • Sulfur

    17. Micro Minerals – Their role in the diet of grazing ruminants • Copper • Zinc • Manganese • Cobalt • Iodine • Iron • Selenium • Fluorine • Molybdenum

    18. What biological type is best suited to Southwestern rangelands?Low production NoHigh production Good YearsMed. production Most Years

    19. Limited forage availability is more detrimental to animals with high rather than low genetic production potential

    20. Stocking rate must be varied to match the nutrient yield of the range Balancing the size of the herd to the nutritional carrying capacity of the range

    21. Dr. Bob Kattnig Associate Livestock Specialist Department of Animal Sciences The University of Arizona RANGE LIVESTOCK NUTRITION A MOVING TARGETUNIVERSITY OF ARIZONABEEF DAYJuly 29, 2009 Thank You