Moving Beyond Compliance: Four Ways States Can Support Districts and Local Data Use - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Moving Beyond Compliance: Four Ways States Can Support Districts and Local Data Use

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  1. Moving Beyond Compliance: Four Ways States Can Support Districts and Local Data Use Dan Domagala, Colorado Department of Education Josh Klein, Oregon Department of Education Jim Harrington, Hillsboro School District (OR) Rebecca Shah, Data Quality Campaign 2012 MIS Conference

  2. Key Objectives • Understand the evolution of the state role from compliance-oriented to service-providing • Understand current state efforts to build and use longitudinal data systems • Learn why state and district collaboration is critical to improve the effective use of data • Learn four guiding principles for states in this work • Understand the complementary data capacity of states and districts

  3. Evolution of the State Role Past Future

  4. States Have Made Unprecedented Progress Toward Building State Longitudinal Data Systems 36statesreport that they have all 10 Essential Elements Nostate had all 10 Essential Elements 2005 2011

  5. States Have Not Taken Action to Support Data Use No state has taken all 10 State Actions 2011

  6. No One Entity Can Succeed Alone: Why State and District Data Collaboration is Critical Past Unnecessary duplication of efforts is avoided Future Systems worked at cross-purposes Maximize data investments and reduce costs and burden Data are provided within context of surrounding districts and schools Data were not high quality, consistent or comparable Ensure cross-district and cross-state comparability State approaches work as customer service entity State system was designed to meet state needs and for compliance Meet the needs of all stakeholders Lessons learned can be leveraged and scaled across the state Low-capacity districts struggled to collect/use data to inform decisions Equalize and enhance district capacity

  7. Colorado State Leader • Dan Domagala, Chief Information Officer, Colorado Department of Education

  8. Colorado Department of Education - www.Schoolview.org

  9. Colorado Department of Education – www.Schoolview.org (SAMPLE DATA)

  10. Colorado Department of Education – www.SchoolView.org (SAMPLE DATA)

  11. Colorado Department of Education – www.SchoolView.org (SAMPLE DATA)

  12. By Working Together, We Get There Faster • Higher Capacity District Improved Student Outcomes • State • Lower Capacity District When states and districts collaborate around data use, each single entity and the entire system can gain more powerful results- improving student achievement and system performance.

  13. Four Guiding Principles for States to Support District Data Efforts to Improve Student Achievement

  14. Oregon Discussant • Josh Klein, Chief Information Officer, Office of Assessment and Information Services, Oregon Department of Education • Jim Harrington, Chief Technology Officer, Hillsboro School District (OR)

  15. Proactively engage districts and other local entities to identify data capacity and inform the design of the state data system and related policies • Develop and disseminate data tools and supports in ways that encourage active use

  16. Build robust partnerships with external research and development organizations (universities, regional education laboratories and others) to develop research questions, conduct analysis and interpret findings from longitudinal data to inform data displays, reports and analytic tools • Develop data portals that are engaging and enable users to access data based on role, and customize displays so the user is able to answer questions and address realworldproblems • Align efforts with developers that are creating data applications for local districts

  17. Oregon Department of Education – www.EducationDataExplorer.com

  18. Collect the data on students and teachers necessary to implement and evaluate state policies, and link these data according to identified promising practices, including developing robust “teacher of record” definitions • Change certification and program approval policies to ensure that educators have proven competency in using data to inform instructional decisionmaking • Share teacher performance data annually and automatically with teacher preparation programs to support their efforts to improve their programs • Provide or support high-quality professional development to develop data literacy among educators on how to analyze, assimilate and apply data in their everyday work

  19. Ensure transparency and clearly communicate data element definitions and collection timelines, providing sufficient time for districts to make changes • Integrate the underlying technology of state and district data and reporting systems so data can be more easily transferred electronically across each system • Focus data collection on the information needed to answer critical policy questions developed through broad-based input in the state

  20. DQC’s 2010 State Data Leader of the Year Serving districts by integrating state data into locally established role-based portals Click here to view this video.

  21. Defining Clear and Complementary Roles

  22. How Will We Know When We Are Successful? When all education stakeholders demand and use quality data to make decisions

  23. For More Information The full publication, including an appendix with promising state practices from 17 states, is available at www.DataQualityCampaign.org/ComplianceToService. To access the summary version, visit www.DataQualityCampaign.org/ComplianceToServiceSummary.

  24. Questions and Answers • Dan Domagala, Chief Information Officer, Colorado Department of Education • Josh Klein, Chief Information Officer, Office of Assessment and Information Services, Oregon Department of Education • Jim Harrington, Chief Technology Officer, Hillsboro School District (OR) • Rebecca Shah, Senior Associate, State Policy Initiatives, Data Quality Campaign