Advances in Desktop 3D Printing Robert Zollo Avante Technology, LLC - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Advances in Desktop 3D Printing Robert Zollo Avante Technology, LLC

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  1. Advances in Desktop 3D Printing Robert Zollo Avante Technology, LLC

  2. WorkshopGoals • Help commercial enterprises assess the viability of desktop 3D printing for their business • Where to go for additionalrelevant information

  3. WorkshopTopics • “State of the Industry” 3D printing • Compare industrial vs desktop 3D printing • Applications andeconomics • Things to consider when using 3D printing • Where to go for additionalrelevant information

  4. What We Do Custom Materials for 3D Printing STL Repair/Validation Software Architected 3D printers Custom Development Consulting

  5. Commercial 3D Printing State of the Industry

  6. $2 Billion+ 35%per year growth! • Conceptual Prototypes • Functional Prototypes • Production Parts (new)

  7. Why 3DPrinting For the past 30 years Rapid Prototyping Saves time Efficient revisions Reduces tooling errors

  8. Why 3DPrinting For the past 5 years: Rapid Prototyping Specialized, Short Run Production

  9. Why3D Printing Now 2013-2014 & beyond: Rapid Prototyping, specialized, Short Run Production and high value production andfixtures, jigs & molds

  10. Pros & Cons Industrial 3D Printers • More Material Options • Larger Scale Parts • Faster Printing (maybe?) • More Precise Parts (maybe?) • More Expensive (it depends..) • Service Bureau Option

  11. Economics Industrial 3D Printers • $25,000 - $1Million • Metal: $100k-$1mil. • Metal mat.: $1k+ /lb • Plastic: $25k -$125k • Plastic: $100 - $500/lb

  12. Plastics Industrial 3D Printers • SLA (stereo-lithography$$$ • DLP (digital laser processing) $$ • FDM (fused deposition modeling) $ - $$$

  13. Industrial 3D Printer Economics Why So Expensive? • Too few vendors • Patent protection • Customer’s lack of knowledge

  14. Pros & Cons Desktop 3D Printers Personal Control Security Valuable Feedback Fast Results (maybe) Lower Costs (probably) Faster Revisions (usually)

  15. Issues with Desktop 3D Printers Lack of precision Un-reliable Limited capabilities Limited materials Few reliable vendors Lack of customer support

  16. 2014: Desktop 3D Printers New Printers More accurate More reliable New materials Few reliable vendors Lack of customer support

  17. Economics New FDMDesktop Printers: • Printers:$1,500 - $3,500 • Plastic Filaments:$20 - $100/lb

  18. WhyNot Desktop 3D Printing Now 2013-2014 & beyond: Rapid prototyping, specialized, short run production and high value production andfixtures, jigs andmolds

  19. Correct Materials Make the Difference Using the right plastic materials enables desktop 3D printers to become highly useful machines for • Conceptual prototyping • Functional prototyping • Production of some parts • Production of jigs, fixtures and mold components

  20. State of the Art 2014 Industrialvs.Desktop Materials • ABS (various grades) • Nylon(various grades) • Polycarbonate & alloys • Polysulphone • Ultem • etc. etc. • PLA • ABS • Nylon • PET/G • Synthetic Rubber • New Composites

  21. Physical Attributes

  22. Aesthetic Attributes

  23. Material Cost Guidelines

  24. 3D Printing Applications FDM Materials by Application: • Conceptual prototyping: PLA, ABS, Nylon • Functional prototyping: ABS, Nylon, Rubber, PETG • Production of some parts: Nylon, Rubber, New Composites* • Production of jigs, fixtures and mold components: ABS, Nylon, New Composites* * proprietary engineering grade materials

  25. Desktop FDM Materials “80/20” Rule: Appropriate use of the right materials enables new generation desktop printers to handle many of the same “state of the art” applications promoted by the industrial printer suppliers (at 10% of the cost!)

  26. Workshop Topics • “State of the Industry” 3D printing • Compare Industrial vs desktop 3D printing • Applications & Economics • Things to consider when using 3D printing • Where to Go for more Relevant Information

  27. Time for a BreakQ&A Question: 1. How does your company design & make new parts? 2. How long does it take? 3. What does it typically cost?

  28. Making Printable Parts “Garbage In…. Garbage Out….”

  29. Making a Printable Design File STL Format File Sources: CAD Scanner Other

  30. e 3DTransform.com Matt Nutsch Founder

  31. Making 3D CAD Files Printable Files Must be: 1. “Water-tight” STL 2. Must consider overhangs 3. Must fit on print bed

  32. 3D Scanning “Reverse Engineering”a part without the blueprints

  33. The “Seven Deadly Sins” of Desktop 3D Printing 1. Flawed CAD Design 2. Defective STL File 3. Poor Calibration 4. Flawed/Wrong Filament 5. Improper Printer Settings 6. Variable Ambient Conditions 7. Ineffective print bed adhesion

  34. Guidelines for Successful Desktop 3D Printing 1. Buy a sturdy printer 2. Calibrate, Calibrate, Calibrate 3. Select the right filament 4. Print height, print speed 5. Print temperature(s) 6. Use of cooling fans 7. In-fill strategy 8. Optimal print adhesion method 9. Use of support material 10. Control the environment 11. Safe pemovalTechniquest

  35. Making Functional Protoypes Adapt the CAD File to meet the Material Specs. Be Careful Scaling Up Part Size: • Warping • Shrinkage • Moisture absorption Physical criteria first Aesthetics second

  36. Making Production Parts BalancePhysical and Aesthetic Characterisitcs: • Design Multiple Parts • Use Multiple Materials • Use Support Material • Integrate via 3D Printing

  37. The Economics of 3D Printing Total Cost of Parts • Design • Prototypes • Pooling • Production cost • Revision cost • Tooling maintenance

  38. Economics of Desktop 3D Printing “Rule of Thumb” Number One

  39. Economics of Desktop 3D Printing “Rule of Thumb” Number Two

  40. Economics of Desktop 3D Printing “Rule of Thumb” Number Three

  41. Many New Materials Available This Year Stratasys “simulated PP”* Natureworks: “PLA co-polymers” Avante Technology: New “Engineering Grade" materials beyond nylon

  42. Parts for Wearable Technology 12 Important Issues: • Toxicity (prolonged skin contact) • Staining (color dye leaching) • Skin irritation (chafing) • Uncomfortable (bad “feel”; causes sweating) • Uncomfortable (poor conformity to body) • Uncomfortable (in-sufficient flexibility) • Recovery from repeated flexing • Swelling due to moisture absorption • Shatter-proof • Sweat-proof • Electromagnetic properties • “Drop Test Compliant”

  43. Key Points: • There are Sufficient Materials Available Today for modern Desktop 3D Printers to create: • conceptual prototypes (PLA, ABS) • functional prototypes (Nylon, PET, Rubber, ABS) • simple, small production parts (Nylon, PET, Rubber, other new) • fixtures, jigs and molds for compression molding, sand casting • There is a productivity and cost reduction role for industrial and desktop 3D printing in many businesses right now • New materials available this year will enable far greater capability

  44. Try Desktop 3D Printing Today… (your competitors already are) For More Information: bob.zollo@gmail.com Avante Technology, LLC.

  45. Resources for More Information • Avante Technology bob.zollo@gmail.com • Software Architects, Inc. raldrich@mac.com • 3DTransform.comMattnutsch@3Dtransform.com • Proforma3DPrinting.com • RepRap.org • namii.org • 3DPrinting.com • wohlerassociates.com • 3D Print Show Bellevue August 2014