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South Carolina Forest Land. KY. VA. TN. OK. NC. AR. SC. MS. AL. GA. LA. TX. FL. Source for Forest inventory and Analysis Data : USDA Forest Service, SRS South Carolina Forestry Commission. The South’s Forestland by State, 1998. 25. 20. 15. Acres. Million. 10. 5.

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Presentation Transcript
slide1
South Carolina

Forest Land

KY

VA

TN

OK

NC

AR

SC

MS

AL

GA

LA

TX

FL

Source for Forest inventory and Analysis Data :

USDA Forest Service, SRS South Carolina Forestry Commission

slide2
The South’s Forestland by State, 1998

25

20

15

Acres

Million

10

5

0

Texas

Florida

Georgia

Virginia

Alabama

Arkansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Oklahoma

Tennessee

Mississippi

North Carolina

South Carolina

Source: Sheffield, USDA Forest Service, SRS, FIA Data

South Carolina ranks 10th in acreage of commercial timberland in the Southeast.

slide3
The distribution of ownerships in SC parallel closely with the Southeast (13 states). A total of 90% of the landowners in SC are private nonindustrial landowners and forest industry.

* FIA 2000 data is preliminary representing 60% of the total plots to be sampled.

Source: USDA Forest Service,

SC Forestry Commission, FIA Data

** Industry includes leased Private lands.

slide4
South Carolina has a fairly even distribution of forest types demonstrating diversity of the forests.

* FIA 2000 data is preliminary representing 60% of the total plots to be sampled.

Source: USDA Forest Service,

SC Forestry Commission, FIA Data

forest type distribution by state
Pine plantation

Natural pine Upland hardwood

Oak–pine Bottomland hardwood

Forest Type Distribution by State

Source: Sheffield, USFS, FIA Data.

slide6
* FIA 2000 data is preliminary representing 60% of the total plots to be sampled.

Source: USDA Forest Service,

SC Forestry Commission, FIA Data

The trend in SC for the past 15 years, as well as the SE, is the divesting of large land holdings by forest companies. Pension funds and partnerships are purchasing much of these large acreages. Industry consolidation and present tax laws have been a major force in this trend, and this trend is expected to continue.

slide7
* Growing Stock is inventory of commercial trees at least 5 inches in diameter in the forest.

** FIA 2000 data is preliminary representing 60% of the total plots to be sampled.

Source: USDA Forest Service, and SC Forestry Commission, FIA Data

Total growing stock volume has increased 111% since 1958. Softwood has increased 106% (or by 4.6 billion cubic feet). Hardwood has increased 117% (or by 4.7 billion cubic feet). Note that Hurricane Hugo (1989) destroyed an estimated 2.5 billion cubic feet and only 387 million cubic feet (15%) was salvaged and is reflected in the 1993 data. The amount of timber destroyed in one day was equivalent to approximately 4 years of harvesting.

slide8
Source: USDA Forest Service, FIA Data, 1993

Forestry has come under criticism of converting too much forestland to planted pine. The perception is that much of the hardwood forests are being converted to pine. The actual trend is demonstrated above showing the conversion of natural pine sites to planted pine. Hardwood area remains relatively constant for the last 50 years.

slide9
Source: USDA Forest Service, FIA Data, 1993

For the last 25 years, forest acreage has remained constant, while forest land ownerships have changed significantly. Individual and corporate landowners have increased in area, industry has increased slightly and is presently in a downturn, while farm ownership of forest land has decreased almost 46 percent. Farm land acreage (crop and pasture acreage) has decreased 34.6 % from 1958 to 1993.

slide10
Source: SC Forestry Commission

During the decade of of the 1990s, SC planted an average of 146,000 acres per year.

slide11
Source: SC Forestry Commission

South Carolina has been a leader in the SE in regard to acres planted relative to timberland acreage. The first spike of acres planted is the Soil Bank Program, and the second spike represents the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP).

slide12
* FIA 2000 data is preliminary representing 60% of the total plots to be sampled.

Source: USDA Forest Service,

SC Forestry Commission, FIA Data

Softwood growing stock is showing remarkable recovery from the hurricane Hugo devastation (1989). With proper management, there should be an increase in growing stock volume for the 10 to 14 inch diameter classes in the next 10 years.

slide13
* FIA 2000 data is preliminary representing 60% of the total plots to be sampled.

Source: USDA Forest Service,

SC Forestry Commission, FIA Data

The distribution of hardwood diameter classes has not shown significant change I the last 22 years.

slide14
> 800

400 - 800

200 - 400

100 - 200

0 - 100

Population density map for North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia

# of People Per Square Mile*

* 1999 population estimates by CACI International, Inc. based on 1990 US Census

Virginia Study (D. Ware, et al., USDA Forest Service,1998)

At approximately 45 people/square mile, there is a 50:50 chance of practicing forestry.

At 150 people/square mile, forest management approaches zero.

forecast change in forest land 1992 2010
Forecast Change in Forest Land 1992-2010

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o

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g

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>

1

4

%

l

o

s

s

8

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1

4

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s

1

-

8

%

l

o

s

s

s

t

a

b

l

e

>

1

%

g

a

i

n

Source: USDA Forest Service, SRS

slide16
52% of the saw logs

77% of the pulpwood

66% of the plywood and veneer

42% of the composite panel

59% of total product output

The Southeast Supplies

Source: Johnson, USFS, TPO Data, 1997.

slide17
Value of Products to the Southeast

Hardwood

Softwood

Total

(Billions of dollars)

Saw logs 5.0 1.2 6.2

Veneer 1.2 .168 1.35

Pulpwood 2.0 1.1 3.1

C. Panel .083 .039 .122

Other .269 .626 .895

All Products 8.494 3.133 11.627

Delivered to mill prices

Source: Johnson, USDA Forest Service, TPO Data, 1997.

slide18
*Stumpage is the value of trees standing in the forest.

The chart represents a total of all roundwood types, and also reflects an increase in production over time. When assessing value and production together in terms of value per cubic foot ($/cu.ft.), there is a 87.4 % increase in delivered value over the 20 year period, or 4.4%/year (simple interest and constant dollars). Total value was calculated by using timber product output data and average stumpage and delivered values by products from Timber Mart-South.

Compiled by Clemson University from USDA Forest Service TPO Data and Timber Mart-South

summary
Forest land base is stable

Overall mix of pine and hardwood has not changed greatly in 5 decades and is not expected to change significantly in the future

Pine component moving steadily toward more planted stands…fewer natural

Greater private ownership will keep the south’s forests productive and in demand

Maximum sustainable harvest levels in sight but no indication of running out of timber in the future

Summary
slide22
Potential constraints on timber supply:

 Timberland Operability - adverse sites, best management practices

 Timberland Availability - ownership, policy, and government control

 Age Structure and Stocking - past management and Hugo’s impact

 Policy Issues - set asides, harvesting restrictions, and potential regulations

 Lack of knowledge and incentives for private non-industrial landowners to practice sustainable forestry

 Lack of proactive public participation by the forestry community

slide23
Opportunities to increase growth and yield

Regeneration with improved seedling stock

 Commercial thinning where feasible

 Harvest and regenerate at maturity

 Salvage and regenerate when appropriate

 Continue investments in R & D

 Other stand improvements where feasible

slide24
1,073,521 Total Tons

85% Softwood

15% Hardwood

Source: USDA Forest Service, TPO Data, 1993

slide25
Wood Residue Disposal in SC

Source: USDA Forest Service, TPO Data, 1997

slide26
Annual Forest Biomass Residuals From Timber Harvesting

Pine ~ 4.1 Million Tons

Hardwood ~ 5.2 Million Tons

economic value of wildlife in south carolina
1.1 million participated in wildlife recreation annually

Annual expenditures top $1.5 billion

$30 million annually for land-use access fees to private landowners

Source: 1996 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation

Economic Value of Wildlife in South Carolina
economic value of wildlife in south carolina1
Hunting in SC Annually Generates ….

10,677 jobs

$357 million in retail sales

$192 million in salaries and wages

$23 million in state and federal taxes

$18 million in sales tax

$658 million in total economic effects

Source: 1996 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation

Economic Value of Wildlife in South Carolina
economic value of wildlife
Hunting in SC

# of hunters 300,000

Days of hunting 6,921,000

Days/hunter 23

Average/hunter $1,150

Average/day $17

Economic Value of Wildlife
economic value of wildlife1
Types of Hunting in SC#Hunters

Deer 245,000

Dove 71,000

Squirrel 56,000

Wild Turkey 53,000

Ducks 44,000

Rabbit 40,000

Quail 34,000

Economic Value of Wildlife
economic value of wildlife in south carolina2
Annual Fishing in SC ...

Total Participants 986,000

Residents 638,000

NR 349,000

Total Expenditures $707 million

Average/Participant $717

Source: 1996 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation

Economic Value of Wildlife in South Carolina
economic value of wildlife in south carolina3
Annual Wildlife Activities# People

Feed Wildlife* 761,000

Observe Wildlife 577,000

Photograph Wildlife 172,000

Maintain Natural Areas 154,000

Maintain Plantings 127,000

Visit Public Areas 101,000

Source: 1996 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation

*Cash receipts for sunflower seed production for wildlife in SC surpassed other agriculture crops in 2000 (Ed Murdock, personal communication)

Economic Value of Wildlife in South Carolina
economic value of wildlife2
Wildlife Watching in SC

Total Participants 1.1 million

Residents 817,000

NR 408,000

Total Expenditures $3 million

Average/Participant $290

Economic Value of Wildlife
landowner income alternatives from wildlife related activities
Permits

Fee Hunting (dove fields)

Fee Fishing

Shooting Preserves

Sporting Clays

Non-consumptive Fee Access

Hunting Leases

Landowner Income Alternatives from Wildlife-Related Activities
summary points to remember

Summary Points to Remember...

Natural resources (forest, wildlife, & fisheries) surpasses agriculture in total economic importance to SC

Diversifies farm/forest land income and compliments traditional land-use & management

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