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PORT STATE CONTROL OF SHIPS An Overview. By : Ajoy Chatterjee Principal Officer Mercantile Marine Department Mumbai. OVERVIEW STRUCTURE. MERCANTILE MARINE DEPARTMENT MUMBAI. FUNCTIONS OF MMD, MUMBAI. # SURVEYS / CERTIFICATIONS SAFETY EQUIPMENT, SAFETY

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port state control of ships an overview

PORT STATE CONTROL OF SHIPSAn Overview

By :

Ajoy Chatterjee

Principal Officer

Mercantile Marine Department

Mumbai

functions of mmd mumbai
FUNCTIONS OF MMD, MUMBAI

# SURVEYS / CERTIFICATIONS

SAFETY EQUIPMENT, SAFETY

RADIO, LOAD LINE, IOPP, ETC.

SAFCON, SEQ, SRT, SAFMAN

CERT. & PLAN APPROVALS.

functions of mmd mumbai5
FUNCTIONS OF MMD, MUMBAI
  • INTERNATIONAL OBLIGATION
  • FLAG STATE INSPECTION
  • - PORT STATE CONTROL
slide6

TRAINING FACILITIES IN INDIA

DIRECTOR GENERAL OF SHIPPING

OTHERS TRAINING INSTITUTIONSMMD’S

POST SEA PRE SEA

MUMBAI CALCUTTA DELHI CHENNAI

MUMBAI DELHI CALCUTTA GOA VIZAG COHIN

slide7

EXAMINATION CENTRES WITHIN THE COUNTRY

DIRECTORATE GENERAL OF SHIPPING

( MINISTRY OF SURFACE TRANSPORT )

OTHERS TRAINING INSTITUTION MMD ( EXAMINATION CENTERS )

MMD MMD MMD

MUMBAI CHENNAI CALCUTTA

slide8

PORT STATE CONTROL

Need For Control

1. To complement Flag state implementation

2. Vessels do not call at Flag state regularly

3. Difficult to appoint inspectors or

recognized organizations at foreign port

slide9

4. Breakdown of equipment in-between

surveys may occur.

5. Prevent operation of sub-standard ships

while avoiding competition between ports

6. Contribute towards :

a) increased level of safety (SOLAS)

b) protection of marine environment

c) improved living conditions

slide12

WHAT IS A SUBSTANDARD SHIP

 ‘Substandard’ is defined in IMO Resolution

A.787(19) as being ‘substantially below the

standards required’ but is interpreted to

widely varying degrees from one organisation

to another.

slide13

They also know that substandard ships don’t

just happen !

It is a commercial decision by someone

somewhere

slide14

PORT STATE CONTROL

Examples of More Detailed Inspections

 General inspections of the state of engine

room & presence of traces of oil in

bilges.

 Ship’s routine of disposing oil-

contaminated water from engine room

spaces.

 Closer examination of ship’s equipment

 Check for any unapproved modifications

made to equipment & system.

slide15

PORT STATE CONTROL

Invalid certificates or ship/equipment do not correspond to certificates

  •  Under the provisions of the Conventions port State may :
  • * Detain a ship until deficiencies have been rectified
  • * A vessel is detained when a deficiency is found which
  • must be rectified before it sails.
  • * Permit a ship to sail with deficiencies subject to
  • conditions
slide16

PORT STATE CONTROL

Avoid unduly detaining or delaying ships

 If equipment/system can be shown

onboard and functional.

 If alternative equipment can be used.

 If deficiencies does not affect safety nor

caused harm to environment.

 If the ship can be allowed to sail to the

next nearest port for rectifying

deficiencies.

slide17

Key Questions on I.S.M (Vis-a-vis PSC)1. N.C. reports of last one year & C A taken.2. Records of Internal audits carried out.3. Report of Master’s review & action taken by DP/Company.

slide18

Involvement of classification society as a result of identification of ISM-Code- related deficiency during PSC Inspections.Case reference :Name of ship : FAL XVIIIType of Ship : Oil TankerIMO No. : 6402705Flag of the Ship : U.A.E.Name of ISM Auditors : Bureau VeritasThe seriousness of the deficiencies noted during PSC Inspection necessitated a verification audit by the Class Concerned

slide19

Major N.Cs – 3 nos. On ISM Code references : (1) 10.2 : Maintenance; (2) 6.5 : Training; & (3) 6.0 : Resource & PersonnelN.Cs – 5 nos.On ISM Code references : (1) 12.1 : Company Verification;(2) 10.2 : Maintenance; (3) 12.0 : Company Verification & review;(4) 7.0 : Shipboard Operation & (5) 10.3 : Maintenance of critical equipment.

slide20

SUMMARY OF PORT STATE CONTROL INSPECTION OF VESSELS FROM JULY 1999 TO June 2000 BY PSCOs OF MERCANTILE MARINE DEPARTMENT, MUMBAI.

slide21

 Unnecessary inspection of “good ships” are avoided, thereby the crew are not unduly disturbed and are able to do their routine work, and are also able to enjoy rest and recreation while the ship is in port.

slide22

 A PSCO’s precious time and effort is not unnecessarily wasted. Well maintained ships, will inspire confidence of prospective clients. “Sub-standard” ships and their operators will be forced to take immediate corrective measures to remain in business.

slide23

The PSC regime of Mercantile Marine Department, Mumbai, has achieved this objective to a large extent, as can be seen from the following table which indicates the results of the last 12 months with an overall average detention rate of 78.5%. We have been able to achieve this by constantly enhancing the skills of our PSCOs by continuous advice and instructions and “peer review” of their inspection reports.

report on port state control inspection for the month of may 2000
Name of reporting Authority

2. Reporting Period

3. Total number of Inspections

Total number of ship with deficiencies

Total number of deficiencies (Note 1)

: Principal Officer, Mercantile Marine Department, Mumbai INDIA.

: May, 2000

: 15

: 15

: 198

REPORT ON PORT STATE CONTROL INSPECTIONFor the month of May 2000
slide33
6. Total number of detentions

7. Deficiencies according to the Flag

8. Deficiencies according to the type of ships

9. Deficiencies according to classification Societies (note : 2)

Deficiencies according to the nature

: 12

: as per Format – I, enclosed

: as per Format – II, enclosed.

: as per Format – III, enclosed.

: as per Format – IV, enclosed.

notes
Notes :
  • Deficiencies are counted in the manner that deficiencies under the same sub-item are counted individually, e.g.3 deficiencies under code number 0711 and 2 deficiencies under code number 0740 are counted as 5 deficiencies under the main item 0700.
  • The table lists the societies with which the ships are classed. The defects for which a ship is detained are not always associated with items, which are under survey by a classification society.
summary of main items of deficiency code are as hereunder
Ship Certificates 0100

3. Accommodation 0300

5. Working Spaces 0500

7. Fire Fighting

Appliances 0700

9. Safety in General 0900

11. Cargo 1100

13. Mooring

Arrangements 1300

15. Navigation 1500

17. Marpol Annex I 1700

Marpol Annex II 1900

21. Marpol Operational

Defects 2100

23. Other Deficiencies 9000

2. Crew 0200

4. Food and Catering 0400

6. Life Saving Appliances 0600

8. Accident Prevention 0800

10. Alarm Signals 1000

12. Load Lines 1200

14. Propulsion &

Auxiliary Machinery 1400

16. Radio 1600

18. Tankers 1800

20. Solas Operational

Defects 2000

22. Marine Pollution

Annex III 2200

Summary of main items of deficiency code are as hereunder :-
slide36
FORMAT – I7. Report of Port State Control Inspection for the month of May, 2000DEFICIENCIES AS PER FLAG
slide41
FORMAT – II8. Report of Port State Control Inspection for the month of May, 2000DEFICIENCIES AS PER TYPE OF SHIP
slide43
FORMAT – III9. Report of Port State Control Inspection for the month of May, 2000DEFICIENCIES AS PER CLASSIFICATION SOCIETY
slide46
FORMAT – IV10. Report of Port State Control Inspection for the month of May, 2000NATURE OF DEFICIENCIES
port state control a view point regulatory bodies
PORT STATE CONTROLA VIEW POINTRegulatory Bodies

IMO Global Reactive and slow

Class (IACS) Global Reactive and

Pro-active

EU Regional Reactive, but quick

Flag States National Reactive/Pro-active

Port States National/ Reactive

Regional

Trend in legislation :

“National” driving “Regional” driving “Global”

port state regime
Port State Regime
  • Targeting of high risk ships.
  • Mandatory inspection every 12 months of certain ship types. More than 2 detentions in 1 year may lead to access refusal.
  • Information to Flag and Class mandatory
  • Information and Transparency
  • Ship/owner/cargo reporting prior arrival.
  • Previous survey by PSC/Class reported
  • Corrective actions follow-up by PSC and CS
flag state regime
Flag State Regime
  • Reliance upon recognised organisations.
  • Continuous improvement of class performance
  • Suspension if non-compliant or non-improving
  • Only exclusive surveyors for Flag State surveys
  • Professional liability, limited financial liability
  • TOCA (Transfer of Class Agreement) part of Directive
complementary future proposals
Complementary Future Proposals
  • EQUASIS ship information database. Active since 01.06.2000. Reports/data/facts. No analysis.
  • Strengthened Vessel Traffic Management
  • A European Maritime Safety Agency. Supervision of National Mar. Adm.
agenda for enhancing safety
Agenda for Enhancing Safety
  • Bulk carrier safety – UR implementation
  • Formal Safety Assessment
  • ESP for tankers – scope extension
  • Strengthening for ships above 15 years
  • Annual examination of ballast tanks next to

cargo tanks with heating coils

  • Scope of intermediate survey hull equal to

preceding special survey, with drydocking

and UTM.

  • 2 exclusive surveyors on RS/IS, ships above

20.000 tdw

  • UTM witnessed or by Society itself or by

direct subcontract to the Society.

slide52
General dry cargo – casualty analysis, ESP ?
  • ISM implementation
  • Uniformity of scantling standards
  • Flag State relations
  • Port Sate relations
  • Self policing/Code of Ethics
  • Class suspensions and TOCA
slide53
Amendments to Existing Rules :
  • Structural assessment (incl. Local

strength/fatigue) from 3rd RS.

  • MARPOL revision proposal to MEPC – large

bunker tanks protective location, e.g.

container ships

  • Permanent repairs of major deficiencies at

survey – extension from bulk carriers to all

vessels

  • IACS guidelines on coating to become UR ?
slide54
ISM – SMC
  • Harmonisation recommended to IMO and

EU. Annual ISM/SMC surveys?

  • ISM and Class deficiencies reciprocal

consequences.

  • Exclusive surveyors on all statutory surveys from 01.07.2001. Leads to co-operation between class societies.
initiatives
Initiatives
  • Transparency
  • List of Suspensions and class withdrawals

on the Internal Home Page.

  • Vessel’s status available to Flag

Administration on the Internet.

  • Information on sister vessel problems other

class societies.

  • Two surveyors for Renewal & Intermediate Surveys of vessels > 20000 dwt under ESP after 15 years of Age.
  • Thickness measurements will be witnessed by an exclusive surveyor if not arranged by class societies.
slide56
Annual Internal Examination of ballast tanks adjacent to Cargo Tanks with heating coils for vessels above 15 years of age.
  • Recommendation to IMO for Harmonisation of ISM/SMC audits with class surveys.
  • IACS self-regulation and responsiveness improved.
  • Crisis Management Team established. Response to media and internal quality assurance.
  • Investigation Team for technical assistance to Flag State and Class Society involved in an accident.
  • Management Review in Council of all IACS Members Quality System compliance.
perception and focus

Where are we today ?

Perception and Focus
  • Tanker Shipping has a Bad image as perceived by the public and politicians at large.
  • Focus on substandard shipping is portraying shipping as a substandard and irresponsible industry – in spite of –
  • Majority of ships are being maintained and operated at satisfactory standards of safety.
owners

Where are we today ?

Owners
  • Tanker rates boosted following Erika. An upbeat mood. But older tankers difficult to employ.
  • Major challenge is implementation of the ISM Code - “it is a means to an end, not the end in itself”.
  • Qualified manning problems. STCW-95 implementation; expectations must be realistic
  • Proliferation of inspections, - an inspection – not a safety, culture
  • Focus on under – or worst – performers – not on high quality performers.
  • PSC detention statistics are commonly used as a quality rating
expectations into the next millennium
Expectations into the next Millennium
  • A shipping industry perceived by the public at large to be safety – and environment – conscious and responsible
  • No loss of life
  • Pollution of the sea/air within acceptable limits
  • Dramatically increasing concern for pollution of the environment
  • Cost-effective designs, based on a life-cycle approach,

What is safe enough today – may not be safe enough tomorrow.

conclusion
Conclusion
  • Enhanced PSC Inspection on a regional basis
  • Some of the Initiative proposed are relevant
  • We already have enough Regulations.
  • Enhanced Survey Programme – If followed
  • ISM Code – If Properly Implemented, Vessel shall ensure compliance with all applicable Rules, Regulations and best Operational Practices.
excellence is never achieved it recedes

Excellence is never achieved it “recedes”

For this reason I.M.O.’s motto is

“Safer Ships & Cleaner Oceans”