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Project Based Learning (PBL). Jacque Melin - GVSU. INTRODUCTION TO PROJECT BASED LEARNING (PBL). History of PBL. John Dewey Benefits of experiential, hands-on, student-directed learning. Learning Theory Research social activity feedback Standards clear outcomes accountability.

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Project Based Learning (PBL)


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    1. Project Based Learning (PBL) Jacque Melin - GVSU

    2. INTRODUCTION TO PROJECT BASED LEARNING (PBL)

    3. History of PBL • John Dewey • Benefits of experiential, hands-on, student-directed learning. • Learning Theory Research • social activity • feedback • Standards • clear outcomes • accountability

    4. Definition of PBL • A systematic teaching method that engages students in learning knowledge and skills through an extended inquiry process structured around complex, authentic questions and carefully designed products and tasks.

    5. Outstanding projects • Recognize students’ inherent drive to learn.

    6. Outstanding projects • Engage students in the centralconcepts and principles of a discipline.

    7. Outstanding projects • Highlight provocative issues or questions that lead students to in-depth exploration of authentic and important topics.

    8. Outstanding projects • Require the use of essential tools and skills, including technology, self-management, and project management.

    9. Outstanding projects • Specify products that solve problems, explain dilemmas, or present information generated through investigation, research, or reasoning.

    10. Outstanding projects • Include multiple products that permit frequent and consistent feedback so students can learn from experience.

    11. Outstanding projects • Use performance-based assessments that communicate high expectations, present rigorous challenges, and require a range of skills and knowledge.

    12. Outstanding projects • Encourage collaborationin some form, either through small groups, student-led presentations, or whole-class evaluations of project results.

    13. Can Project Based Learning work in my school? • For students with basic skills issues: • More direct instruction during project • Design shorter projects • Tie projects to fewer and more specific standards

    14. BEGIN WITH THE END IN MIND

    15. STEPS FOR DEVELOPING A PBL STEPS

    16. FIRST STEP – Develop the Project Idea • Use your standards. • Find projects and ideas on the Web. • Map your community. • Match what people do in their daily work. • Tie the project to local and national events. • Focus on community service. • Work backward from the topic.

    17. Project Based Learning http://pbl-online.org/ • Edutopia http://www.edutopia.org/ • Buck Institute for Education http://www.bie.org

    18. SECOND STEP – Decide on the Scope of the Project

    19. SECOND STEP – Decide on the Scope of the Project Project Design and Students’ Role

    20. SECOND STEP – Decide on the Scope of the Project Project Activities and Students’ Role

    21. THIRD STEP – Select Standards Accountability: What do you want your students to KNOW, UNDERSTAND and BE ABLE TO DO?

    22. THIRD STEP – Select Standards Accountability: What would you be embarrassed about if your students couldn’t discuss them intelligently at the end of the project?

    23. THIRD STEP – Select Standards Accountability: TIP: Try NOT to meet too many standards in a short project – no more than 3 per subject.

    24. THIRD STEP – Select Standards Accountability: TIP: Include at least one literacy outcome in your project – assess writing, speaking and/or reading.

    25. FOURTH STEP – Incorporate Simultaneous Outcomes PBL is not only a way of learning, it’s also a way of working together to gather and present information: Collaboration Performance Based Products Skills (i.e. SCANS) – See handout Habits of Mind – See handout

    26. FIFTH STEP – Work from Project Design Criteria • The Project should include the 6 A’s • Authenticity • Academic Rigor • Applied Learning • Active Exploration • Adult Connections • thoughtful Assessment Practices

    27. FIFTH STEP – Work from Project Design Criteria Other important criteria: Does the project…. Meet standards?Engage students?Focus on essential understandings?Encourage higher-level thinking?Teach literacy and reinforce basic skills?Allow all students to succeed?Use clear, precise assessments?Require the sensible use of technology?Address authentic issues?

    28. FIFTH STEP – Work from Project Design Criteria Projects versus Activity-Based Teaching Strategies

    29. FIFTH STEP – Work from Project Design Criteria

    30. FIFTH STEP – Work from Project Design Criteria

    31. FIFTH STEP – Work from Project Design Criteria

    32. FIRST STEPS – Work from Project Design Criteria

    33. FIFTH STEP – Work from Project Design Criteria

    34. SIXTH STEP – Create the Optimal Learning Environment • Give your project one or more connections beyond the classroom. • Study content and apply it to authentic problems. • Alter your classroom’s look and feel. • Make school work more like real work.

    35. SIXTH STEP – Create the Optimal Learning Environment • See the whole before practicing the parts.

    36. CRAFT THE DRIVING QUESTION

    37. Craft the Driving Question • Guidelines for Driving Questions Must be provocative • Sustain students’ interest • Does music video paint an accurate picture of America?

    38. Craft the Driving Question • Guidelines for Driving Questions Are open-ended • No easy answers • Should the United States have used the atomic bomb in World War II?

    39. Craft the Driving Question • Guidelines for Driving Questions Go to the heart of a discipline or topic. • Can focus on controversies central to a field and debated by the professionals within them. • How safe is our water?

    40. Craft the Driving Question • Guidelines for Driving Questions Are challenging • Encourage students to confront difficult issues and try out unfamiliar behaviors. • When are people justified in revolting against an established government?

    41. Craft the Driving Question • Guidelines for Driving Questions Can arise from real-world dilemmas that students find interesting. • How could we build a new community center using only materials that are native to our state?

    42. Craft the Driving Question • Guidelines for Driving Questions Are consistent with curricular standards and frameworks. • Lead students to master the agreed upon skills, knowledge, and processes that define a course of study.

    43. Avoid the Pitfalls • Beware of Bells and Whistles • Project activities must be designed to help answer the Driving Questions. • Sometimes technological tools obscure the problem solving process. • Technology becomes the focus.

    44. Refine the Driving Question

    45. Refine the Driving Question

    46. Refine the Driving Question

    47. Refine the Driving Question

    48. Refine the Driving Question

    49. Refine the Driving Question

    50. Refine the Driving Question