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Project-Based Learning. Workshop Outcomes. Develop an understanding of the rationale for and best practices in PBL design , assessment, and management Integrate 21 st century skills and PBL Align PBL with provincial learning outcomes Create the first draft of a PBL plan

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slide2

Workshop Outcomes

  • Develop an understanding of the rationale for and best practices in PBL design, assessment, and management
  • Integrate 21st century skills and PBL
  • Align PBL with provincial learning outcomes
  • Create the first draft of a PBL plan
  • Participate in a peer review protocol to improve the PBL plan
slide3

Day 1 Agenda

8:30 – 10:15 Overview of PBL rationale and methodology

10:30 – 12:00 Begin with the End in Mind/ Crafting a Driving Question

12:00 – 1:00Lunch

1:00 – 2:30 Begin with the End in Mind/ Crafting a Driving Question (cont…)

2:45 – 3:30 Assessment

slide4

Day 2 Agenda

8:30 – 10:15 Managing projects

Creating a collaborative culture

Developing high-performance teams

Entry and exit strategies

10:30 – 12:00 Planning time

12:00 – 1:00 Lunch

1:00 – 1:30 Using the Project Planning Rubric

1:30 – 3:30 Peer Review Protocol

slide5

Why change anything?

  • An ‘international crisis of disengagement’
  • Industrial vs. Information Age
  • Kids come to school to watch their teachers work!
slide6

An education system that was designed in the 19th century doesn’t work really well in the 21st century.

legacy policies and traditions
Legacy policies and traditions
  • Agrarian calendar and circadian rhythm
  • A system of “bells and cells”
  • Crammed curriculum
  • Not enough emphasis on higher order thinking
  • Lack of competency assessment
slide8

Generation Net

  • Sheltered kids of “helicopter parents”
  • Team-oriented and assertive
  • Multi-taskers
  • Always had the net
  • Receive and process information differently
  • Published authors and artists
  • Social-networkers
  • Disengaged and disconnected
slide9

Digital learners prefer learning “just in time.”

Many educators prefer teaching “just in case.”

slide10

NB Student Survey

  • 61% reported that most of class time was used to sit and listen to the teacher
  • 43% reported that they were taught things they already knew
slide11

NB Student Survey

  • Only 42%felt that they were inspired to learn in school
  • Only 39%felt that it was important to do well in school
becoming relevant
Becoming relevant
  • Challenge the status quo
  • Integrate the curriculum
  • Reduce number of learning outcomes – go deep
  • Use authentic, real-world problems to guide learning activities, curriculum development and assessment
  • Get past the social networking debate
slide14

Those who dislike change

will dislike irrelevance

even more.

slide15

We are the future.

You will know we are ready when we are:

  • Highly skilled in literacy, numeracy and science
  • Critical thinkers and creative problem- solvers
  • Collaborators
  • Skilled communicators
  • Resourceful, reliable, resilient and physically active
  • Involved in our communities, yet connected to the world
slide17

Kids don’t know what to do…

when they don’t know what to do!

slide21

BenjaminBloom

Taxonomy of Learning

slide23

Bloom’s Taxonomy

Evaluation

Circa 1956

Today’s revision

slide24

Bloom’s Taxonomy

Evaluation

Circa 1956

Today’s revision

slide28

Rigour

Relevance

slide29

Rigour

Relevance

slide30

C

D

Rigour

A

B

Relevance

slide31

Rigour/Relevance Framework

Creating 6

Evaluating 5

Analyzing 4

Applying 3

Understanding 2

Memorizing 1

slide32

Rigour/Relevance Framework

Creating 6

Evaluating 5

Analyzing 4

Applying 3

Understanding 2

Memorizing 1

2

Apply knowledge in one discipline

1

Knowledge in one discipline

3

Apply knowledge across disciplines

4

Apply knowledge to real-world predictable situations

5

Apply knowledge to

real-world unpredictable situations

slide33

Rigour/Relevance Framework

Creating 6

C

Assimilation

D

Adaptation

Evaluating 5

Analyzing 4

Applying 3

A

Acquisition

B

Application

Understanding 2

Memorizing 1

2

Apply knowledge in one discipline

1

Knowledge in one discipline

3

Apply knowledge across disciplines

4

Apply knowledge to real-world predictable situations

5

Apply knowledge to

real-world unpredictable situations

slide34
Quadrant A – Acquisition

Recall or awareness of basic knowledge. Students gather and store bits of knowledge and information that they are generally expected to remember and understand.

Low rigour/low relevance

For example:

Memorize elements in the periodic table

Write an essay on a historical topic

Distinguish rational and irrational numbers

slide35
Quadrant B – Application

Definite opportunities for students to apply knowledge and design solutions, typically for a real-world problem.

Low rigour/high relevance

For example:

Apply laws of gasses to design storage containers

Prepare a multi-media presentation

Calculate mathematical values for an excellent golf swing

slide36
Quadrant C – Assimilation

Complex activities that require students to extend and refine their understanding in one subject area.

High rigour/low relevance

For example:

Calculate potential and kinetic energy of a roller coaster

Analyze characters in a novel

Solve quadratic equations and linear inequalities

slide37
Quadrant D – Adaptation

Learning experiences are high in rigour and relevance, complex (multi-disciplinary), creative, and require unique solutions to unpredictable problems.

High rigour/high relevance

For example:

Create a building plan for a roller coaster

Develop guidelines for publishing material on the web

Devise a sound nutritional plan for a group of 3 year-olds who are picky eaters

slide38

Rigour/Relevance Framework

Creating 6

Student Thinks and Works

Student Thinks

Evaluating 5

Analyzing 4

Applying 3

Teacher Works

Student Works

Understanding 2

Memorizing 1

2

Apply knowledge in one discipline

1

Knowledge in one discipline

3

Apply knowledge across disciplines

4

Apply knowledge to real-world predictable situations

5

Apply knowledge to

real-world unpredictable situations

slide39

Relevance

Rigour

Relationships

Reflection

slide40

Rigour/Relevance and PBL

“Children become better problem solvers in direct relation to the opportunities they have to solve problems and to reflect on what works and what doesn’t.

Real-world problems do not come neatly packaged with predictable, easy-to-solve answers, so we need to provide students with experience in grappling with problems that mirror the world beyond school.”

~Willard Daggett

project based learning
Project-Based Learning

www.bie.org

www.pbl-online.org

project based learning1
Project-Based Learning
  • A different method of teaching and learning
  • Not just the icing on the cake!
  • A substantial change – PLCs and CFGs
  • Dewey-ist tradition of learning by doing
  • Core instructional approach – but not the only D quadrant strategy
slide50

What works for PBL

The School:

  • A consistent culture/system
      • e.g. student-centred learning
  • A supportive infrastructure
      • e.g. common planning time
  • A unified vision for achievement and success
      • e.g. common skills rubrics
slide51

What works for PBL

The Teacher:

  • Genuine interest in content
  • Youth-friendly
  • A feel for inquiry
  • Ability to model competencies
  • Planning and design skills
slide52

What works for PBL

The Student:

  • An explanation of ‘why PBL’
  • Progressive training
  • A sense of partnership and community
  • Clarity of outcomes and performance measures
  • Support and leadership from the teacher
slide53

What works for PBL

The Parent:

  • May need to be re-educated about projects (letter home suggested)
  • Invite them to the presentations; give them rubrics to help assess
  • May need Kleenex when they see kids ‘performing’ during exhibitions
slide54

The 7 Cs of PBL

  • Curriculum
  • Competencies
  • Collaborative
  • Current
  • Community
  • Connected
  • Cool!!
slide56

Design Principle 1Begin With the End in Mind

  • Only 2-3 specific outcomes from the curriculum document (big picture ideas)
  • 1-2 components of the NB Competencies
  • Avoid mission creep!
slide57

PBL resources are in the Portal!

  • Go to portal.nbed.nb.ca
  • Search in People for Ruth.Wilson
  • Click on Shared Documents
slide58

NB Competencies

  • Critical thinking and creative problem solving
  • Collaboration
  • Communication
  • Personal development and self awareness
  • Global citizenship
slide59

Planning backwards

Who is the audience for the work?

What products will students create?

How will you assess the student work?

How should activities be organized?

slide60

Keep it real!

  • Connect to your community
  • Include at least one literacy outcome
  • Assign real work products
  • Bring in the experts
slide61

Design Principle 2Craft the Driving Question

  • Abstract/Conceptual
      • What is justice?
      • Should art be censored?
  • More concrete
      • Is our water safe to drink?
      • Are roller coasters safe?
slide62

Design Principle 2Craft the Driving Question

  • Problem-Solving
      • How can we improve traffic flow around our school?
      • How does our government use policy to address an economic crisis?
  • Design Challenge
      • How can we design a school theatre to meet specs and seat the most people?
      • How can we build a website to attract more visitors to our community?
slide64

Refining the Driving Question

From “simple right answer” to more complex, local, and actively problem-solving:

What are the characteristics of healthy soil?

Is our soil healthy enough to support a vegetable garden?

slide65

Refining the Driving Question

From abstract to concrete and challenging:

How do architects use geometry?

How can we design a theatre that meets building specifications with the greatest number of seats?

slide66

Refining the Driving Question

From “too big” to answerable:

How has technology affected world history?

Has technology made war more or less humane in Iraq and Afghanistan?

slide67

Refining the Driving Question

How and why do rivers influence

the settlement and culture of populations?

How and why has the Saint John River influenced

the settlement of Fredericton?

slide68

Refining the Driving Question

Is breaking the law justifiable?

To be a good citizen, must you always obey the law?

slide69

Refining the Driving Question

Does music reflect political events?

Prove or disprove

How does music reflect political and cultural

upheaval in history?

slide70

Refining the Driving Question

How does tourism affect the historical

locations, the economy and the environment

of New Brunswick?

Is tourism helpful or harmful to the history, economy, and environment of New Brunswick?

slide71

Refining the Driving Question

Can science be used to solve crimes?

Would you trust your guilt or innocence to science?

slide72

PBL Resources

  • http://wvde.state.wv.us/teach21/pbl.html
  • http://projects.hightechhigh.org/

http://www.pbl-online.org/

http://www.bie.org

http://pathways.ohiorc.org/

http://www.envisionprojects.org/cs/envision/print/docs/750

http://www.wested.org/pblnet/exemplary_projects.html

http://virtualschoolhouse.visionlink.org/projects.htm

slide73

Design Principle 3Plan the Assessment

  • A balanced assessment plan includes a variety of:
  • formative and summative assessment activities;
  • team and individual activities;
  • and a balance between knowing and doing.
slide75

Design Principle 4Map the PBL

  • Timelines and milestones
  • Plan the entry event
  • Develop the entry package and briefcase
  • Plan the final presentations
  • Debriefing activity
slide77

Design Principle 5Managing PBL

Managing progress:

  • rough drafts, concept maps, models, storyboards, plans, proposals, research notes, practice presentations (assess, don’t grade)
  • opportunities for teacher and peer feedback
slide78

Design Principle 5Managing PBL

Managing process:

  • lists of questions for inquiry
  • journals / blogs
  • resource lists
  • ask groups to report / meet with group leaders
slide79

Managing PBL – Entry Package

  • Project Calendar
  • Rubrics and Assessments
  • Resource list
  • Presentation/exhibition schedule
  • Teams list
  • Checklist (due dates and points possible)
  • Templates for contracts, task lists, etc.
slide80

Managing PBL – Entry Event

  • Field trip
  • Guest speaker
  • Film, video, website
  • Lively discussion
  • Simulation or activity
  • Provocative reading
  • Startling statistics
  • Puzzling problem
  • Piece of real or mock correspondence
  • Song, poem, art
slide81

Managing PBL: Day 1

  • Launch with the Entry Event
  • Introduce the Driving Question
  • Create need-to-know list or set of questions for inquiry
  • Distribute and review Entry Package
slide82

Managing PBL: Day 1

Students begin to….

  • Hold initial team meetings
  • Write team contracts
  • Write preliminary task lists
  • Complete individual activity logs
  • Begin research, reading, or other content-related work
slide83

The 7 Cs of PBL

  • Curriculum
  • Competencies
  • Collaborative
  • Current
  • Community
  • Connected
  • Cool!!

How can we design a walking trail with minimum eco-systems impact?

slide84

The 7 Cs of PBL

  • Curriculum
  • Competencies
  • Collaborative
  • Current
  • Community
  • Connected
  • Cool!!

How does art affect mood?

slide85

The 7 Cs of PBL

  • Curriculum
  • Competencies
  • Collaborative
  • Current
  • Community
  • Connected
  • Cool!!

How can we help businesses in our community become wheelchair accessible?

slide86

Managing PBL - Teamwork

  • Clear criteria: collaboration rubric, contracts, set of expectations / norms
  • Practice skills before and during project
  • Monitoring style: helicopter vs. predator drone
  • Sit with each team occasionally
  • Reports from teams / leaders
  • Hiring and firing
slide87

Managing PBL - Teamwork

  • Teams, not groups
  • Teacher chooses team members
  • Create a set of expectations for team work (e.g. collaboration rubric) and assess/grade it
  • Team contracts (possibly with a firing clause)
  • Teach students project management skills: dividing tasks, managing time, setting deadlines
  • Regular check-ins
slide88

Managing PBL – Final Presentations

  • Arrange schedule, logistics in advance
  • Invite audience, plan their role, provide information and rubrics
  • Have audience ask questions to assess content and process
slide89

Managing PBL – Final Presentations

  • Individual accountability in teams:
        • require shared presentation duties
        • question each individual (about any part of presentation)
        • play hardball: any student may be asked to do any part of presentation
        • collect reports on who did what work to prepare
slide90

Managing PBL – Final Presentations

Avoid death-by-repetition presentations:

  • Varied answers to DQ or solutions to problem
  • Differentiate point of view / roles
  • Same DQ but use varied texts, places, times, people, cultures, etc.
  • Choice of products / ways to present answer to DQ
slide91

Managing PBL – Final Presentations

  • Practice, practice, practice!
  • Make work products as authentic as possible
  • Public audience ups the stakes = higher quality
  • Require students to share presentation duties
  • Give audience members an assessment role
slide92

Characteristics of Great Projects

  • The work has personal and/or social value beyond the school setting.
  • The work is taken seriously by adults engaged in similar issues or work.
  • Students have access to appropriate technology, tools, and materials.
  • Students see a reason for what they are doing beyond getting a grade.
  • The work is structured to emulate high performance work environments.

http://www.hightechhigh.org/unboxed/issue3/keeping_it_real/

slide93

It’s a wrap!

  • Whole group, focus group, small group, individual
  • Get info by discussion, survey, journal, etc.
  • Content: what was learned (correct any misunderstandings); what was the answer to the DQ
  • Process: how we learned and worked; skills we developed
  • The entire PBL experience: the good, the bad, and the ugly
  • Where do we go from here? (future projects, skills to work on, connections to the course, next unit, etc.)
slide94

Reflect and perfect!

  • Celebrate success
  • Facilitate student self-reflection and self-assessment
  • Gather feedback on project design and management
  • Use data to remediate and to improve your project
  • Collect examples of student work
  • Archive your project
  • Write thank you notes to your outside experts
slide95

Critical Friends Protocol

  • A gives an overview of the project. (7 minutes)
  • B asks clarifying questions. (3 minutes)
  • A “leaves.”
  • B discusses the project.
      • Warm “I like …” (4 minutes)
      • Cool “I wonder if …” (4 minutes)
      • “A good next step might be to …” (4 minutes)
  • A “returns” and reflects. (3 minutes)