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Using the Harvard Referencing System. College of Health & Social Care. September 2010. Why do I need to reference?. Reading, understanding and correcting referencing the work of others in your assignments is important. By correctly referencing you will:

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using the harvard referencing system

Using the Harvard Referencing System

College of Health & Social Care

September 2010

why do i need to reference
Why do I need to reference?
  • Reading, understanding and correcting referencing the work of others in your assignments is important.
  • By correctly referencing you will:
    • Protect yourself against accusations of plagiarism
    • Demonstrate that you have read widely
    • Show your understanding of a topic
    • Support your arguments with published research
  • If you don’t reference correctly you may commit plagiarism, which is seen as academic misconduct and carries penalties.
  • http://www.governance.salford.ac.uk/cms/resources/uploads/File/AQA/28_Policy_on_the_Conduct_of_Assessed_Work_(Academic_Good_Conduct).pdf
what should i reference
What should I reference?
  • Acknowledging the work of others in your assignments gives academic credibility to your work by allowing you to back up your arguments with published material.
  • You should reference anything you have taken from another work, whether you are paraphrasing, summarising or directly quoting.
  • Some things can be taken as common knowledge and do not therefore need to be backed up with a reference.
taking notes
Taking notes

Taking clear notes during your reading will make referencing much easier and quicker.

  • Make a note of: author / title / date / publisher details and chapter details / page numbers if relevant.
  • If it is online, note the web address and the date and time you accessed it.
  • Make clear distinction between any direct quotes you write down and information written in your own words so you don’t accidently plagiarise when you come to write you assignment
citing in your text
Citing in your text
  • The first part of a Harvard reference is the in-text citation where you acknowledge the sources you read.
  • Use (author, date) and page numbers if applicable.
  • Consider the flow of your writing when choosing how to include the citation.
quotations
Quotations
  • Use quotation marks ‘t’ and page number(s) to indicate a direct quote.
  • Short quotes can be included in your own sentence:
  • Longer quotes should be indented and in a separate paragraph:
  • Avoid overusing quotations.

Continuing professional development allows people to ‘build on their knowledge and skills to develop their level of competence’ (Alsop, 2000, p.64).

Evidence suggests that the popularity for alternative medicine is growing.

‘It is estimated that a third of the population have

tried the remedies of complementary medicine or

visited its practitioners’ (Dimond, 2004, p.378).

paraphrasing
Paraphrasing
  • Presenting an idea or argument in your own words.
  • Ensure it is significantly altered from the original to avoid issues of plagiarism (just changing a couple of words is not enough!).
  • Paraphrases relate to specific sections of a work, so it is good practice to include the page number as you would do with a direct quotation.

Effectively preparing patients by dealing with questions, setting goals and making the patient feel involved in their care can significantly reduce postoperative anxiety and may have a positive impact on their subsequent recovery (Lees, 2010, p.11).

summarising
Summarising
  • A brief outline of the main points of a work without going into specific details.
  • Generally summaries relate to a whole work, or to a large section, so are much less specific than paraphrasing.
  • As a summary potentially covers most or all of a work, it does not require page numbers to be given as they are for direct quotations and paraphrasing.

A recent study by Sampson (2009) demonstrated that moderate alcohol consumption may reduce the risk of dementia in later life.

secondary references
Secondary References
  • Where the passage you are referring to is the authors own reference to another work.
  • You are relying on their accurate and unbiased reproduction of that work, so it is much better to locate the source and read and reference it directly in you own work.
  • If you cannot locate the original, secondary reference it by:

A study concluded that marijuana users felt ‘less confident’ than cocaine users about being able to stop taking the drug. (Budney et al, 1998 cited in Butcher, Mineka & Hooley, 2010, p.412).

In the body of your text cite both works

Butcher, J. N., Mineka, S. & Hooley, J. M. (2010) Abnormal Psychology (14th ed). Boston, Parson Education Inc.

In your end list:

Reference the item you have read.

the end list
The End List
  • At the end of your work include a list of references.
  • List in alphabetical order by author, do not separate into different types of work.
  • The following slides show how to reference correctly.
      • Always check your programme / module handbooks to see which form of end list is required.

Bibliographies and Reference Lists

how to reference a
How to reference a…

BOOK

Author(s)

Surname.Initial(s),

Use & between two authors.

Date

Year of publication

Title

In sentence case and italicised.

Publisher

Place of publication, publisher.

how to reference a12
How to reference a…

e-BOOK

Date

Year of publication

Author(s)

Surname.Initial(s),

Use & between two authors.

Title

In sentence case and italicised.

Publisher

Publisher followed by [Online].

Access information

Give homepage of website, and date and time you accessed the resource.

(As e-books often require a login, only the homepage needs to be given.)

how to reference a13
How to reference a…

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Date

Year of publication

Author(s)

Surname.Initial(s),

Use & between two authors.

Article Title

In sentence case

Journal Title

In Title Case and italicised

Journal information

Give volume and issue as x(x), followed by page numbers

pp. For multiple pages

p. For a single page item

how to reference a14
How to reference a…

e-JOURNAL ARTICLE

Date

Year of publication

Author(s)

Surname.Initial(s),

Use & between two authors.

Article Title

In sentence case

Journal Title

In Title Case and italicised

Access information

Give homepage of website, and date and time you accessed the resource.

(As e-journals often require a login, only the homepage needs to be given.)

Journal information

Give volume and issue as x(x), followed by page numbers

pp. For multiple pages

p. For a single page item

Follow with [Online].

how to reference a15
How to reference a…

Date

Year site last updated (often shown at the bottom of the page).

If not known, enter (no date).

WEB PAGE

Author(s)

Surname.Initial(s) if a person is the author. Otherwise use corporate author or organisation.

Access information

Give full address of webpage, and date and time you accessed the resource.

Page Title

In sentence case

Website Title

In Title Case and italicised. Followed by [Online].

how to reference
How to reference …

Anything else…

http://www.resources.fhsc.salford.ac.uk/referencing/

Full referencing guide

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