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Washington State Classroom Based Assessment. This test is used to assess classroom based knowledge in the area of Health and Fitness. CONCEPTS OF FITNESS. The test is made up of multiple choice, short answer, and critical thinking questions in the following areas: 1. Body Fat

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washington state classroom based assessment

Washington State Classroom Based Assessment

This test is used to assess classroom based knowledge in the area of Health and Fitness

concepts of fitness
CONCEPTS OF FITNESS
  • The test is made up of multiple choice, short answer, and critical thinking questions in the following areas:
  • 1. Body Fat
  • 2. Calories and Caloric Requirements
  • 3. Diet
  • 4. FITT Principle
  • 5. Health Related Fitness Concepts
  • 6. R.I.C.E.
  • 7. S.M.A.R.T. Goals
  • 8. Benefits of Exercise
  • 9. Overload Principle
  • 10. Principle of Progression
  • 11. Principle of Specificity
overall fitness
OVERALL FITNESS
  • Overall fitness has four components. These include mental, social, emotional, and physical. Physical fitness is your body systems working together efficiently for a healthy lifestyle. It allows you to perform many activities each day without getting too tired. Health and wellness requires a well balanced diet and an all inclusive exercise program.
physical fitness components
PHYSICAL FITNESS COMPONENTS

Skill Related

  • Agility – Your body’s ability to change direction quickly and to control movements.
  • Balance – Keeping an upright position while standing or moving.
  • Coordination – Your senses and body parts working together to use two or more body parts at the same time.
physical fitness components cont
PHYSICAL FITNESS COMPONENTS CONT.

Skill Related

  • Reaction Time – The amount of time it takes you to move once you realize the need to act.
  • Speed – The ability to cover a lot of ground in a short period of time.
  • Power – The ability to use strength quickly.
physical fitness components cont1
PHYSICAL FITNESS COMPONENTS CONT.

Health Related

  • Cardiovascular Endurance – The ability to exercise your entire body for long periods of time without stopping.
  • Strength – The amount of force your body can produce at one time.
  • Flexibility – The ability to move your joints through it’s full range of motion.
physical fitness components cont2
PHYSICAL FITNESS COMPONENTS CONT.

Health Related

  • Muscular Endurance – The ability to use your muscles many times without tiring.
  • Body Composition – The percentage of your body weight that is fat vs. lean body mass.
skill related vs health related fitness
SKILL RELATED vs. HEALTH RELATED FITNESS
  • Skill related fitness components help us perform better in games and sports. We are born with these skills and it is hard to develop. Just because you have skill related fitness doesn’t mean you are healthy. To be healthy, you need a balance of the health related fitness components. All people can improve on their health related fitness regardless of their athletic ability.
benefits of health related fitness
BENEFITS OF HEALTH RELATED FITNESS

Lowers your risk of:

Heart Disease Osteoporosis

Heart Attack Obesity

Diabetes Resting H.R.

Atherosclerosis Depression

Cancer Stress

High Blood Pressure Stroke

benefits of health related fitness1
BENEFITS OF HEALTH RELATED FITNESS

Improves:

Self Image

Self Esteem

Metabolism

Good Cholesterol

Sleep

Energy Levels

Sport and Activity Performance

Mental Performance

Life Expectancy

cardiovascular endurance activities
CARDIOVASCULAR ENDURANCE ACTIVITIES

Speed Walking Jogging

Biking Swimming

Aerobics Aerobic Machines

Hiking Canoeing/Kayaking

Cross Country Skiing Dance

Racquetball Soccer

Basketball Snow Shoeing

strength activities
STRENGTH ACTIVITIES

Weight Lifting

3 Sets of 10 or less Reps of:

Squats Bench Press

Cleans Triceps Pull - Down

Lunges Bicep Curls

Leg Press Lat Pull - Down

Leg Curls Back Row

Leg Extensions Military Press

flexibility activities
FLEXIBILITY ACTIVITIES

Sit and Reach – Hamstrings

Butterflies – Inside Thighs

Beauty Queens – Lower Back

Calf Stretch - Gastrocnemius

Hip Stretch – Quadriceps and Hip Flexors

Arm Over the Top – Triceps

Arm Across the Chest - Deltoids

muscular endurance
MUSCULAR ENDURANCE

Muscular Endurance can be enhanced with weight training using 3 sets of 12 or more reps. Muscular endurance is also improved with any of the activities listed on the cardiovascular endurance activity’s list.

f i t t principle
F.I.T.T. PRINCIPLE

The F.I.T.T. Principle is a guideline for building fitness

  • F – Frequency. Frequency refers to how often you exercise per week. 3 – 5 days is the recommended amount of exercise a person should engage in to improve upon fitness levels.
f i t t principle cont
F.I.T.T. PRINCIPLE CONT.
  • 2. I – Intensity. Intensity refers to how hard a person works during exercise. If you work at a low intensity during your workout, you can not improve your fitness levels. Inversely, if you work too hard, it can have adverse effects as well. Measurements of intensity varies as to which fitness component you are working on.
f i t t principle cont1
F.I.T.T. PRINCIPLE CONT.
  • 3. T – Time. Time refers to the length of a particular exercise activity. The time will vary depending on which component of fitness you are working on.
f i t t principle cont2
F.I.T.T. PRINCIPLE CONT.
  • 4. T – Type. Type refers to a particular activity to improve upon certain components of fitness. This is also referred to as specificity. For example, you wouldn’t choose arm curls to improve your cardiovascular endurance. You would choose an activity like jogging or biking to improve cardiovascular function.
cariovascular endurance and the f i t t principle
CARIOVASCULAR ENDURANCE AND THE F.I.T.T. PRINCIPLE
  • F – 3 -5 days a week.
  • I – Work within your target zone (65 – 90% of maximum heart rate).
  • T – A minimum of 20 – 60 minutes of non-stop activity.
  • T – Any activity that fits into the definition of cardiovascular endurance.
muscular strength and the f i t t principle
MUSCULAR STRENGTH AND THE F.I.T.T. PRINCIPLE
  • F – 2 – 3 days a week on non-consecutive days.
  • I – 3 sets of low reps (75 – 90% of one rep max)
  • T – The time it takes to perform 3 sets of all the targeted muscles for that particular workout.
  • T – Lifts that work the targeted muscle groups.
flexibility and the f i t t principle
FLEXIBILITY AND THE F.I.T.T. PRINCIPLE
  • F – Daily stretching of each muscle group is recommended.
  • I – Stretch muscle group beyond its normal length.
  • T – Stretch each muscle group for 15-30 seconds.
  • T – Choose stretches to prepare the muscles that will be used in the activity.
muscular endurance and the f i t t principle
MUSCULAR ENDURANCE AND THE F.I.T.T. PRINCIPLE
  • F – 3-6 days a week.
  • I – for weight training, 3 sets of light weight high reps (20 – 55% of 1 max rep)
  • T – The time it takes to perform 3 sets of all the targeted muscles for that particular workout.
  • T - Lifts that work the targeted muscle groups.
finding your target heart rate zone
FINDING YOUR TARGET HEART RATE ZONE
  • Subtract your age from 220 to find maximum heart rate.
  • Multiply that number by .65 for the low end range and .90 for the high end range.
  • This gives you the range for your target heart rate per minute.
principle of specificity
PRINCIPLE OF SPECIFICITY
  • Specificity states that the specific type of exercise you do determines the specific benefits you receive.

Example:

To improve upon your cardiovascular endurance you would choose an activity such as jogging. Lifting weights, although important, would not enhance endurance.

principle of overload
PRINCIPLE OF OVERLOAD
  • To produce significant fitness benefits, you must make your body adapt by requiring it to work harder than it normally does.

Example

When weight lifting, add weight to your sets. Your muscles adapt to the weight change and they become stronger.

principle of progression
PRINCIPLE OF PROGRESSION
  • Progression refers to gradual increases in intensity and time to improve fitness levels.

Example

When swimming, increase your pace so your heart rate is increased within the target zone. Also add 5 or more minutes to your swim.

exercise preparation
EXERCISE PREPARATION
  • When beginning an exercise program it is wise to get a medical check-up for clearance.
  • Start gradually and build as you go to allow your body to adapt to more vigorous activity.
  • Know the environmental conditions surrounding you such as weather, pollution levels, altitude, etc.
order of exercise
ORDER OF EXERCISE
  • Warm up – Prepares your body for more vigorous activity. Helps prevent injuries. Enhances performance.
  • Stretch – For reasons stated above.
  • Activity – Specific to your goals.
  • Cool Down – Prevents dizziness and fainting. Prevents blood pooling in lower extremities. Improves flexibility.
common sense injury prevention
COMMON SENSE INJURY PREVENTION
  • Start slowly and build gradually.
  • Listen to your body – There is no such thing as “No Pain, No Gain”.
  • Use moderation – Overuse injuries can be common.
  • Dress properly.
common types of injury
COMMON TYPES OF INJURY
  • Overuse Injury – These injuries occur with repeated movements over and over creating wear and tear on your body.
  • Side Stitch – Pain in the lower abdomen usually associated with jogging. It will go away by adjusting your pace or when activity is finished.
common types of injury cont
COMMON TYPES OF INJURY CONT.
  • Micro trauma – Small injuries that do not show up in X-rays. They often do not cause pain or discomfort right away. However, after time these injuries get worse and start to show up.
  • Sprain – An injury to a ligament. A ligament is the tough tissue connecting bone to bone.
  • Strain – An injury to a tendon. A tendon is the tough tissue connecting muscle to bone.
r i c e
R.I.C.E.
  • R – Rest Rest is vital for the body to protect the injured area from further damage. Resting is also needed to allow your body to build the energy to begin repairing the injured area.
  • I – Ice Use ice or cold packs in the injured area to relieve pain and reduce swelling. Remember to only ice 15-20 minutes to avoid damage to the skin.
r i c e cont
R.I.C.E. Cont.
  • C – Compression Use an Ace bandage to wrap the injured area to help reduce swelling. Make sure it is not too tight and cuts off circulation.
  • E – Elevation Elevate the injured area so it is above the heart. This will help reduce swelling.
s m a r t fitness goals
S.M.A.R.T. FITNESS GOALS
  • S -Specific Be specific on your goals. Goals too broad will be hard to plan for. Specific goals will drive your workout plan.
  • M – Measurable Make sure you can accurately measure your goals so you know when you have been successful.
  • A – Action Make sure your exercise plan has specific action-oriented activities to reach your goals. Goals without plans are useless.
s m a r t fitness goals cont
S.M.A.R.T. FITNESS GOALS CONT.
  • R – Realistic Set realistic goals that are obtainable for you. Unrealistic goals soon become very frustrating and people tend to give up.
  • T- Time Set a specific time frame for your goals. This will keep you on track and will keep you motivated to succeed.
nutrition
NUTRITION
  • A well balanced diet that includes all food groups provides your body with the nutrients to perform efficiently and properly.

Protein – 2-3 servings a day

Grains – 6-11 servings a day

Vegetables – 3-5 servings a day

Fruits – 2-4 servings a day

Dairy – 2-3 servings a day

Snacks/other – none to sparingly

nutritional terms
NUTRITIONAL TERMS
  • Calorie – The energy contained in food.
  • Caloric Intake – The amount of food you eat in a day measured in calories.
  • Metabolism – The amount of energy your body burns to function throughout the day.
  • Healthy Body Fat – The percentage of fat in your body. 12%-20% for boys and 18%-25% for girls is healthy. 25% and over is unacceptable.
weight control
WEIGHT CONTROL
  • There are three options for weight control:

1. Weight Maintenance

2. Weight Gain

3. Weight Loss

***The best way to control weight is to balance caloric intake with caloric expenditure.

1. To maintain your current weight the amount of calories you eat and the amount you burn should equal each other.

2. To gain weight you must take in more calories than you burn.

3. To lose weight you must take in less calories than you burn.

fad diets
FAD DIETS

Stay away from fad diets. How do you know if it is a fad diet?

  • Promises quick weight loss
  • Says you can eat whatever you want
  • Pills / not a food group
  • Doesn’t require exercise
  • Eliminates food groups
  • Starvation
  • Has warning labels
  • Vitamin supplements required
  • Side effects
  • Not long term
  • DOES NOT REQUIRE A LIFESTYLE CHANGE