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Using Data and Success Stories

Using Data and Success Stories

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Using Data and Success Stories

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  1. Using Data and Success Stories Howell Wechsler, EdD, MPH Director, Division of Adolescent and School Health Healthy Maine Partnerships Annual Meeting Augusta ME, January 20, 2011 National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Division of Adolescent and School Health

  2. Overview • DATA • Purposes • Sources • Presentation • SUCCESS STORIES • Purposes • Components • Identifying Successes

  3. Identify 5 Ways We Can Use Data to Support Health Promotion Programs • Focus attention on a problem • Compare results in different locations • Plan programs and monitor progress over time • Guide curriculum and professional development • Support proposed policies and legislation • Seek funding

  4. “Without data you are just a schmuck with an opinion.” Alan Greenspan, Former Chair of the U.S. Federal Reserve

  5. Identify 5 Sources of Data That You Might Use • Student Surveys • School Health Profiles • Census • Vital Statistics • School Policy Database • Agency Reports • Event participant evaluations

  6. Presenting Data So That You Get Attention

  7. Dissemination of YRBS Data Training Materials Summary Reports Special Reports Combination Reports Fact Sheets Posters Newsletters Websites Data Release Event Brochures

  8. Presenting Data So That You Get Attention • Describing a problem • Comparing different locations • Showing trends over time

  9. Maine Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 2009 Number of students in a high school class of 30 who: Attempted suicide1 (7.9%) 2 Smoked cigarettes2 (18.1%) 5 Used marijuana2 (20.5%) 6 Had been in a physical fight1 (22.8%) 7 Had at least one drink of alcohol2 (32.2%) 10 Had ever had sexual intercourse (46.0%) 14 21 Did not eat enough fruit3 (70.9%) Did not get enough physical activity3 (82.1%) 25 1 - During the past 12 months; 2 – During the past 30 days; 3 – During the past week Source: Maine Youth Risk Behavior Survey

  10. U. S. Children Born in 2000 1in3 will develop Diabetes during lifetime Narayan KMV et al. Lifetime risk for diabetes mellitus in the United States. JAMA. 2003;290(14):1884

  11. Consequences of Obesity in Children % of children, aged 5-17, with 1 or more risk factors for heart disease: % of children, aged 5-17, with 2 or more risk factors for heart disease: 13% 26% Freedman DS et al. JPediatr 2007;150(1):12-17

  12. Consequences of Obesity in Children obese obese % of children, aged 5-17, with 1 or more risk factors for heart disease: % of children, aged 5-17, with 2 or more risk factors for heart disease: 13% 26% 39% 70% Freedman DS et al. JPediatr 2007;150(1):12-17

  13. Percentage of Secondary Schools that Prohibited All Tobacco Use in All Locations* 18% - 41% 42% - 50% 51% - 58% 59% - 73% No Data MAINE: 59% *Prohibited the use of all tobacco, including cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, cigars, and pipes; by students, faculty and school staff, and visitors; in school buildings; outside on school grounds; on school buses or other vehicles used to transport students; and at off-campus, school-sponsored events; during school hours and non-school hours. School Health Profiles, 2008

  14. Percentage of Middle and High Schools That Prohibited All Tobacco Use in All Locations* — Selected States and Median Among 47 States, 2008 73 66 66 66 51 33 24 22 18 * Prohibited the use of all tobacco, including cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, cigars, and pipes; by students, faculty and school staff, and visitors; in school buildings, outside on school grounds, on school buses or other vehicles used to transport students, and at CDC, School Health Profiles, 2008

  15. Teen Births Per 1,000 Females in U.S. and 16 Other Nations, 2006* Netherlands 3.8 Switzerland 4.5 Japan 5.1 Denmark 5.9 5.9 Sweden Italy 7.0 France 7.8 Norway 8.7 Finland 9.4 10.1 Germany Greece 11.3 11.5 Spain 13.3 Canada 16.1 Australia (2004) 16.8 Portugal 26.7 United Kingdom United States 41.9 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 *All birth rates are for 2006 unless otherwise noted; Source: United Nations Demographic Yearbook, 2006

  16. Percentage of U.S. Children and Adolescents Who Were Obese, 1963-2008* 19.6 18.1 4.6 4.2 Ages 6-11 Ages 12-19 *>95th percentile for BMI by age and sex based on 2000 CDC BMI-for-age growth charts. **1963-1970 data are from 1963-1965 for children 6-11 years of age and from 1966-1970 for adolescents 12-17 years of age. CDC, National Center for Health Statistics

  17. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

  18. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1991 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15%-19%

  19. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1992 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

  20. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1993 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15%-19%

  21. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1994 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15%-19%

  22. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

  23. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1996 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

  24. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1997 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data < 10 % 10%-14% 15%-19% ≥ 20%

  25. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1998 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data < 10 % 10%-14% 15%-19% ≥ 20%

  26. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1999 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data < 10 % 10%-14% 15%-19% ≥ 20%

  27. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data < 10 % 10%-14% 15%-19% ≥ 20%

  28. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2001 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15%-19% 20%-24% ≥25%

  29. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2002 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15%-19% 20%-24% ≥25%

  30. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2003 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15%-19% 20%-24% ≥25%

  31. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2004 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15%-19% 20%-24% ≥25%

  32. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2005 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15%-19% 20%-24% 25%-29% 30%

  33. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2006 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15%-19% 20%-24% 25%-29% 30%

  34. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2007 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15%-19% 20%-24% 25%-29% 30%

  35. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2008 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15%-19% 20%-24% 25%-29% 30%

  36. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1990, 1999, 2008 1999 1990 2008 No Data <10% 10%-14% 15%-19% 20%-24% 25%-29% 30%

  37. http://www.flixxy.com/200-countries-200-years-4-minutes.htm

  38. What do you think of when you hear the phrase “success story”?

  39. DASH Definition of a Success Story • A brief (1-2 page) narrative that describes the achievements and progress of a program/activity • Three basic sections • Problem overview • Program/ activity description • Program/ activity outcomes

  40. Why Are Success Stories Important? • Capture progress over time • Educate decision makers about the outcome of your program • Demonstrate responsible use of resources to stakeholders • Share “best practices” with other similarly funded programs • Attract new partners for collaboration

  41. Problem overview Describe problem and why it’s important (use data when available) Specify affected populations Program/ activity Outline steps taken to implement program Identify who, what, when, and where Link to funding source Documentation of outcomes Clearly describe outcomes of program and associated impact Provide context for why impact is important Provides conclusion that effectively wraps up the story Components of a Compelling Success Story

  42. Activity: Hosted a symposium to provide policy guidance to school district teams Output: Fifty teams indicated on a post-training evaluation that they would likely use the information received to develop district policy Compelling Outcome: Twenty of the fifty district teams adopted a new (or strengthened an existing) tobacco-free school policy Distinguish Compelling Outcomes from Activities & Outputs

  43. Identify your target audience Determine the needs or interests of your target audience Tailor your success story to meet their needs Effectively Reaching Your Audience with Success Stories

  44. Identify one success from your program that you would like to highlight in a success story Keep in mind: Components of a Compelling Success Story Difference between Compelling Outcomes, Outputs, and Activities Target Audience Discuss with person sitting next to you ACTIVITYIdentifying a Success Story

  45. What is exciting about the stories you heard from your partner? Did you get information on all 3 components? Were you able to distinguish between activities, outputs, and outcomes? Were you able to explain the needs of a key target audience? Group Discussion

  46. Distinguishing Outcomes from Program Activities and Outputs Activity

  47. Group Discussion: Communicating Success • Discuss the following questions at your table • How have you communicated with decision makers? • What strategies have been the most effective for you in reaching this audience? • What lessons you would share with someone about communicating successes with a decision maker?

  48. Questions & Comments

  49. Using Data and Success Stories Howell Wechsler, EdD, MPH Director, Division of Adolescent and School Health Healthy Maine Partnerships Annual Meeting Augusta ME, January 20, 2011 National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Division of Adolescent and School Health