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Promoting Student Engagement in School: Addressing the Silent Epidemic of Dropouts

Promoting Student Engagement in School: Addressing the Silent Epidemic of Dropouts

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Promoting Student Engagement in School: Addressing the Silent Epidemic of Dropouts

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  1. Promoting Student Engagement in School: Addressing the Silent Epidemic of Dropouts Leadership I Meeting Division of Instruction October 6, 2009 The Ten Oaks Ballroom

  2. David Bruzga Administrative Director Secondary Schools

  3. Congratulations Hammond Middle School…National Blue Ribbon Award Winner

  4. All HCPSS High Schools MADE AYP

  5. The two sides of the continuum remind me of Jim Collins’s “window-mirror” analogy--leaders who peer out the window see “others” as being problematic, whereas leaders who look into the mirror peer into themselves for answers in how to work with those who are culturally different from themselves.” Dana Rivers, Los Angeles Unified School District

  6. High Performing School Districts… Focus on what they can do rather than what they can’t. -Kati Haycock

  7. Systemic Expectations • Knowing our students • Knowing what interventions and supports are in place to ensure their success • Having a process for continuously monitoring their progress • Developing a relationship with students and their families

  8. Executive Summary Improve Teaching and Curricula to Make School more Relevant and Engaging and Enhance The Connection Between School and Work Improve Instruction, and Access to Supports, for Struggling Students Build a School Climate that Fosters Academics Ensure That Students Have a Strong Relationship With At Least One Adult in the School Improve the Communication Between Parents And Schools

  9. Outcomes • Increase an awareness of the risk factors that cause students to drop out • Analyze the student groups that are dropping out • Dialogue about supports that would enhance our efforts to engage students

  10. Lisa Boarman Coordinator School Counseling and Related Services

  11. What is the “profile” of a dropout ?

  12. Almost 90% of the fastest growing and highest paying jobs require some post-secondary education. Source: Alliance for Excellent Education

  13. Top Five Reasons for Dropping Out Classes were not interesting. Missed too many days and could not catch up. Spent too much time with people who weren’t interested in school. Had too much freedom and not enough rules in my life. Was failing in school. 47% 43% 42% 38% Source: The Silent Epidemic: Perspectives of High School Dropouts; Bridgeland, Dilulio, Morison; 2006. 35%

  14. Warning Signs for Dropouts Failing Math Behavior Issues Attendance less than 80% Failing English Retention Sixth Graders Source: Preventing Student Disengagement and Keeping Students on the Graduation Path in Urban Middle-Grades Schools: Early Identification and Effective Interventions (Balfanz,Herzog, MacIver, 2007)

  15. There is no single pathway that every dropout follows BUT there are common patterns and common crisis spots.

  16. The transitions to middle school and high school is a critically important time.

  17. Drop out prevention is not a high school issue -- it’s a K- 12 issue.

  18. Pamela Blackwell DirectorStudent Services Craig Cummings Coordinator Alternative Education

  19. Once your school district has identified indicators that have an especially strong link to students dropping out, collecting and analyzing individual student-level data on these indicators should be a routine and ongoing process.

  20. 9th Grade Dropout Activity

  21. Student Withdrawals Grade 9 • What patterns do you see in the data? • What surprises you? • What additional information would be helpful to know? • How could you use this information?

  22. Why HCPSS Students Were Withdrawn? • Lack of Interest (W33) • Whereabouts Unknown (W50) • Lack of Academic Success (W31) Source: HCPSS Exit Interviews

  23. Warning Signs for Dropouts in HCPSS Scoring Basic in Math Students Who Receive FARMS Attendance less than 90% Scoring Basic in Reading Retention Specifically 9th Grade Ninth Graders Source: HCPSS Exit Interviews

  24. MSDE Standard for Dropouts 100% of all high schools will report 3% or less of all students in all student groups dropping out of school.

  25. Maryland Report Card Data • HCPSS Dropouts by student groups included: • 92 White students (.92%) • 95 Female students (1.13%) • 62 FARMS students (3.08%) • 144 Male students (1.63%) • 90 African American students (2.31%) • 32 Special Education students (2.36%) • 37 Hispanic students (4.03%) • 18 LEP students (4.80%) • 20 Asian Pacific Islander (.63%)

  26. HCPSS Standard for Dropouts 100% of high schools will have a maximum 1.25% dropout rate • 254 Educational (Exit) Interviews • Groups Not Meeting Standard • FARMS • Males • African Americans • Special Education • Hispanic • LEP

  27. How Should We Use the Data? Analyze patterns Discuss, plan and take action Assess effectiveness of supports

  28. BREAK

  29. David Bruzga Administrative Director Secondary Schools

  30. HCPSS Dropouts What do we know about the students on the list? What kind of activities really engage these students in instruction? How do we increase the capacity of our teachers to engage the full range of students in our instructional program? What interventions are in place to ensure their success? What process do we have in place to continuously monitor their progress and articulate that with each other? How are we working to develop a relationship with these students and their families? How are we supporting students and families as they transition between levels?

  31. Craig Cummings Coordinator Alternative Education

  32. Why Discuss Student Engagement Now? • June 2009, MSDE Summit to Address the Issue of Dropouts • All LEAs Charged with Developing a Dropout Prevention Plan • June 2009 HCPSS Planning Team formed

  33. Why Discuss Student Engagement Now, cont.? • HCPSS Planning Team • School administrators (ES, MS, HS) • Alternative Education, Student Services, ESOL, Special Education, Family and Community Services, School Administration and SAPE • School Counselors, PPWs • Community Agency Personnel-Juvenile Services, Social Services, NAMI • HCEA • Howard Community College • Student(s)

  34. David Bruzga Administrative Director Secondary Schools

  35. “High Performing School Districts Set Their Goals High.”

  36. Choose Civility WeekOctober 5th-9th

  37. Promoting Student Engagement in School: Addressing the Silent Epidemic of Dropouts Leadership I Meeting Division of Instruction October 6, 2009 The Ten Oaks Ballroom