Tailoring A Grant Application To A Grantor’s Vision… While Avoiding Mission Drift - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Tailoring A Grant Application To A Grantor’s Vision… While Avoiding Mission Drift

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  1. Tailoring A Grant Application To A Grantor’s Vision… While Avoiding Mission Drift

  2. Mary Jean Houlahan, RN, BSN, BA, CCM President and CEO COMMAND PRESENCE : “ Speaking Authentically” Oncology Patient Navigation President Elect Florida Coalition of Oncology Nurse Navigators (561) 302-7559 mjhoulahan@comcast.net

  3. USED MY OWN FREQUENT FLYER MILES

  4. OUR HOSPITALS

  5. ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATION

  6. CHAIRMAN OF THE VERY BORED

  7. THE BREAST CENTER

  8. Patient Registration “You don’t wait for us, we wait for you!”

  9. MAMMOGRAPHY WAITING AREA

  10. UNDISCIPLINARY TEAM

  11. TUMOR REGISCZAR

  12. LACK OF QUALITY IMPROVEMENT DIRECTOR

  13. BREAST CANCER NAVIGATOR

  14. BREAST RADIOLOGIST

  15. BREAST PRE-TREATMENT CONFERENCE DISCUSSION

  16. CANCER COMMITTEE MEETING-CANCELED

  17. MARKETING AND COMMUNITY OUTRAGE DEPARTMENT

  18. IT line is busy-send in a ticket

  19. HOW I GET TO WORK

  20. HOW THE BREAST SURGEON GETS TO WORK

  21. THE PATHOLOGISTS ARE AT WORK

  22. THE ONCOLOGISTS JUST TEXT.

  23. Patient Navigation: More than “The Standard of Care” • NAPBC Standard 2.2 • Intradisciplinary Care • Input=Output • Why now more than ever?

  24. Initiating Factors in Implementing a Patient Navigator Program Foundation mission statements define ideals through which they support patient care and well being. Embracing their goals in a way that increases your value and reduces their risk will give your grant team the edge.

  25. IN BREAST CANCER NAVIGATION AS IN THE SUPERBOWL, SAVING LIVES AND CHANGING THE SCORE IS A LABOR INTENSIVE, EXPENSIVE, AND SERIOUS CHALLENGE. SO… 1. BE READY 2. KNOW THE PLAYBOOK and…

  26. PLAY LIKE A CHAMPION TODAY !

  27. THINK LIKE A CHAMPION TODAY! • When ball teams play and swim teams have meets, they know their competition! • Know: How Foundations think Who funds them How they perceive risk How they implement Study: The Foundation’s Community Profile is their play book Execute the play convincingly!

  28. WHAT IS THEIR ENDPOINT? • HEALTH? • EDUCATION? • SOCIAL ISSUES?

  29. WHO FUNDS THE FOUNDATIONS? • WHERE DOES THEIR MONEY COME FROM AND HOW DO THEY SUSTAIN IT? WHAT RISKS ARE THEY WILLING TO ASSUME? • WHAT ARE THEIR DISBURSEMENTS? • WHAT MAKES YOUR GRANT RFP A GOOD RISK?

  30. MISSION INVESTING • Proactive financial investments made to (1) further a foundation’s mission and (2) recover principal invested or earn financial return. • Q: What does this mean to you as you apply for a grant? • A: An opportunity to exponentiate their investment returns.

  31. Who invested when? • 1700’s Tradesmen • 1970’s Community Investing 2007 Financial markets in question • 2010 Health focused mission investing

  32. Leverage- How do Foundations use it? • When leveraging, or supplementing the incentives of the capital markets foundations can alleviate suffering. • They do this by making grants and using their endowments to craft market-based solutions to social problems. • Lisa Richter, GPS Capital Partners

  33. Foundations invest by “strategic benefit” • Foundation: Impact, levels of support, how flexible they are to fund FP and NFP, Alignment, Leverage, etc. • Grantee: Capacity, sustainability, management, credibility of concept, partnership • Society and Market: Innovation Catalyst, efficiency in use of resources, accountability, changes in policy

  34. Foundation Investment Challenges Needs Resources Pressure to grant when markets are good problematic sustainability for the long term. Access to commercial funds for NFP Alignment with foundation and grantee

  35. SHOW ME THE MONEY !

  36. The Record Speaks for Itself • Over 40 years, 92 foundations realized 2.3 billion in Program Related Investing There is $350-400 million invested annually . • Growth in volume was 16.2% from 2001-2005 • 2010: Smaller foundations provide 44% of grants

  37. Perceiving Risk • To grant or not to grant??? Repayment capacity is not necessarily the issue. • Is there a revenue stream for this project that will sustain it? • Is this project well managed and does it have resources to carry out its objectives?

  38. What is their appetite for risk? • INVESTING IN YOU • Reputational risk Lackluster performance and synergy • Reports to their investors/donors show low return on investment • INVESTING IN THE MARKETS • Could cause direct harm • May neither benefit nor harm • Not aligned with the foundation mission

  39. IMPLEMENTATION 101 • Implementation puts science into service.

  40. LT. Col. Patrick “ Hot Lips” Houlahan, USMC Afterburner Seminars IIMPLEMENT BY THE BIG PICTURE-NOT THE LITTLE RED BUTTON

  41. IMPLEMENTATION 101 • Evidence based proposals: • Research findings+needs to be addressed=better outcomes • Q: Why is that important to your RFP? • A: $200 billion-Yearly government and foundation expenditures on treatment research • $2 trillion on support services • Patients only benefit from interventions they receive. • Dean L. Fixsen and Karen A. Blase, 2010

  42. IMPLEMENTATION 101 Mark Lipsey( 2007) Quality+ implementation = strong outcome predictor For the grantee this means implement well to build capacity that will sustain your program through outcomes that really make a difference.

  43. IMPLEMENTATION 101 • Paul Nutt (2002) Why Decisions Fail • Do not rely on laws and regulations, following the money, keeping supporting roles and functions the same, giving out information and training alone to successfully implement a program. • Intervention and implementation result in positive outcomes.

  44. IMPLEMENTATION 101 • Tucker, Edmonson, and Nembhard (2005) • Intervention is knowing WHAT. • Implementation is knowing HOW.

  45. IMPLEMENTATION 101 • Fixen and Blase (2007) developed the theory of “Implementation Drivers and Team.” • A well selected, trained and coached staff • + • Technical and Adaptive Leadership • + • Data, Administration and systems support = • Innovation to produce benefit

  46. IMPLEMENTATION 101 • The Implementation Team • Prepares departments and staff • Prepares the institution and community • Prepares the systems • Prepares the stakeholders • They are now ready to assure that implementation will produce the benefits that you want- • a sustainable grant program.

  47. IMPLEMENTAION 101 • Why do good concepts die? • “Numbers Don’t Lie” • Fixen, Blasé, Timbers and Wolf in 2001 and Balas and Boren in 2000 determined that : • If you have effective implementation of an intervention, it will be 80% effective in 3 years. • If you just let it happen it will only be 14% effective in 17 years!

  48. IMPLEMENTATION 101 • The better the implementation the lower the budget costs along the continuum. • Micro and macro-organizations must change and adapt for innovation to seed successfully. • If you always do what you always did you’ll always get what you always got. Value each other in new ways. Shaking things up does not mean shaking people down.

  49. ESSENTIAL COMPONENTS OF AN RFP Anhinga-snake bird