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Psychology 3260: Personality & Social Development. Don Hartmann Spring 2007. Lecture 14: Emotion & Schooling. Supplementary References.

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Psychology 3260: Personality & Social Development


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    1. Psychology 3260: Personality & Social Development Don Hartmann Spring 2007 Lecture 14: Emotion & Schooling

    2. Supplementary References • Mac Iver, D. J., Reuman, D. A., & Main, S. R. (1995). Social structuring of the school: Studying what is, illuminating what could be. Annual Review of Psychology, 46, 375-400. • Reynolds, D., & Cuttance, P. (Eds.). (1992). School effectiveness: Research. policy, and practice. London, England: Cassell.

    3. Overview of Emotions & Schooling Lecture • Overlap: 115-117 • Lecture: • Psychosocial factors place children at risks for emotional problems • Emotional problems: types & causes • Emotional problems and their association with school problems • Identification of at-risk children • Levels and intensity of interventions • Next: Lecture #15: Attachment I

    4. Psychosocial Risk Factors… • Social (and distal): Poverty, mental illness, drug addiction, low educational attainment of parents, reliance on public assistance, single parents • Risks are cumulative • Psychological (and proximal): • Parents who express more negative emotion, • engage in more conflict, and • are ineffective in helping children deal with their feelings.

    5. Emotional Disturbances: The big 3 • Poor physiological regulation • Poor emotional-regulation • Poor self-regulation

    6. Physiological Regulation • Training typically begins the early weeks of life with gradually emerging control of bio-physiological systems, such as sleep and attention. • Physiological dys-regulation is found in babies exposed to prenatal/perinatal risks and in chaotic rearing contexts and inadequate parenting. • The consequences of bad training: children who continue to have disturbed sleep, heightened irritability, and erratic alertness.

    7. Disturbed Sleep Dysfunctional Parenting Physiological Dys-regulation Heightened Irritability Erratic Alertness

    8. Emotion-Regulation (a) • Begins during the 1st years of life, and depends on appropriate caregiver inputs; e.g., • Soothing & facilitation of infant attention to potential soothers • controlling for the infant extreme emotional stimulation • descriptions of feelings

    9. Emotion-Regulation (b) • Later is a function of children’s Emotional Knowledge (EK) and their ability to reason about and talk about emotions. • EK skills are normally developed through • Emotion expression and discourse about emotion feelings in the home • Parental use of emotion coaching • Child factors of emotionality/temperament and verbal ability

    10. Self-Regulation • Well underway in the 2nd year • Delay of gratification (a la Walter Mischel) • Complying with family norms • Requires perceptive parenting & an emotional bond between parent and child

    11. Schooling & Regulation (a) • The relationships that children build with peers and teachers arebased on children’s ability to regulate emotions in prosocial versus antisocial ways

    12. Schooling & Regulation (b) • Those relationships then serve as a “provision” that either help or hurt children’s chances of doing well academically in school… • --e.g., children who act in antisocial ways are less likely to be accepted by classmates and teachers, participate less in classrooms and do more poorly in school.

    13. Schooling & Regulation (c) • Disruptive kids are… • --Tough to teach • --Lose opportunities to learn from their classmates…. • --Children who are disliked by teachers and classmates grow to…

    14. Identification & Intervention • Identify children— earlier rather than later • Intervene with them • Either at the preschool or early school years. School as a locale for change! • Interventions can be focused on the child and the school, the child and the home (parents), social risk factors such as poverty and crime, or some combination of these • For example, low-intensity intervention in the classroom…

    15. Summary of Emotions & Schooling Lecture • Introduction: The Thesis • The Argument: • Psychosocial factors place children at risks for emotional problems • Emotional problems: types & causes • Emotional problems association with school problems • Identification of at-risk children • Levels and intensity of interventions • Next: Lecture #15: Attachment I • Go in Peace