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Performance Band Descriptors Extension II 2007 & 2010 PowerPoint Presentation
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Performance Band Descriptors Extension II 2007 & 2010

Performance Band Descriptors Extension II 2007 & 2010

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Performance Band Descriptors Extension II 2007 & 2010

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  1. Performance Band Descriptors Extension II 2007 & 2010 Band E4 (32.13%) (28.06%) • Demonstrates highly developed insights and outstanding ability to formulate and communicate complex concepts supported by thorough and extensive independent investigation. Composes a substantial and sustained original major work that effectively engages audience and is appropriate to purpose, concept and medium. Exhibits sophisticated and highly developed ability to articulate, monitor and reflect on processes of investigation, interpretation, analysis and composition.

  2. Performance Band Descriptors Extension II 2007 & 2010 • Band E3 (47.14%) (53.4%) Demonstrates well developed insights and accomplished ability to formulate and communicate complex concepts supported by competent independent investigation. Composes a substantial and sustained original major work that engages audience and is appropriate to purpose, concept and medium. Exhibits well developed ability to articulate, monitor and reflect on processes of investigation, interpretation, analysis and composition.

  3. Performance Band Descriptors2007 Higher School Certificate • Band E2 (18.28%) (16.84%) Demonstrates developing insights and sound ability to formulate and communicate concepts of some complexity supported by independent investigation. Composes a substantial and sustained original major work that is appropriate to audience, purpose, concept and medium. Exhibits sound ability to articulate, monitor and reflect on processes of investigation, interpretation, analysis and composition.

  4. Performance Band Descriptors2007 Higher School Certificate • Band E1 (2.35%) (1.68%) A mark in this band indicates that the student has achieved below the minimum standard expected.

  5. HSC English Extension Course 2 Requirements • In the HSC English Extension Course 2 students develop a sustained composition, and • document and reflect on this process. • Students undertaking HSC English Extension Course 2 must complete the Major Work. Major Work • This module requires students to work independently to plan and complete a Major Work in the form of an extended composition. It allows students to select an area of personal interest from their specialised study of English and develop their work in this area to a level of distinction.

  6. HSC English Extension Course 2 Requirements • Students compose the Major Work as an extension of the knowledge, understanding and skills developed in the English (Advanced) and (Extension) courses. • The Major Work is to be substantial. It may be imaginative, investigative, interpretive, analytical or any combination of these. • The chosen form and medium must be appropriate to the nature of the task, the student’s interests and abilities and the resources available.

  7. HSC English Extension Course 2 Requirements • To provide the basis for the Major Work, students undertake ongoing, systematic and rigorous investigation into their chosen area. This investigation process is documented in a journal that demonstrates the processes of inquiry, interprets, analyses and reflects on the knowledge and understanding gained, and explains the stages of the composition of the Major Work. • The Major Work will be assessed internally as a process and externally as a product.

  8. Reporting achievement at the HSC The Higher School Certificate credentials received by students are used by the Board to report both the internal and external measures of achievement. Higher School Certificate results in English Extension 2 Results comprise: • an assessment mark derived from the mark submitted by the school and produced in accordance with the Board’s requirements for the internal assessment program • an examination mark derived from the HSC external examination • an HSC mark, which is the average of the assessment mark and the examination mark • a performance band, determined by the HSC mark. Student performance in an HSC course is reported against standards on a course report. The course report contains a performance scale for the course describing levels (bands) of achievement, an HSC mark located on the performance scale, an assessment mark and an examination mark.

  9. Reporting achievement at the HSC Important: • The distribution of marks is determined by students’ performances against the standards and not scaled to a predetermined pattern of marks.

  10. Assessment components and weightings Extension II • The mandatory components and weightings for the HSC course are set out below. The internal assessment mark submitted to the Board of Studies is to be based on the HSC course only. • Component Weighting • Skills in extensive independent investigation 25 • Skills in sustained composition 25 Total: 50

  11. Internal External Assessment • The use of both internal assessment and external examinations of student achievement allows measurements and observations to be made at several points and in different ways throughout the HSC course. Taken together, the external examination and internal assessment provide a valid and reliable assessment of the achievement of the knowledge, understanding and skills described for each course.

  12. English Extension 2 HSC examination specifications The English Extension 2 HSC examination will: • consist of a submitted Major Work, worth: 40 marks • An accompanying Reflection Statement, worth: 10 marks. Major Work (40 marks) • The Major Work must be a substantial composition. The composition may use any medium of presentation appropriate to the nature of the composition and must be one, or a combination, of the following: • • Imaginative • • Investigative • • Interpretative • • Analytical.

  13. Certification of Major Work • This is required to ensure that each work is wholly the work of the student entered for the HSC and has been completed under the supervision of the English teacher. It is essential that: (a) aspects of the process of development of the Major Work take place in school time (b) work completed away from school is regularly monitored by the supervising teacher (c) each student signs a statement, witnessed by the supervising teacher and the school principal, that the submitted Major Work is his or her own work (d) the Major Work Journal (see below) is submitted with the Major Work. • This requirement is necessary for verification of authenticity and will be referenced in the case of appeals being made to the Board of Studies. • The journal will be submitted at least three times at key points during the course to assist with verification. If the final version of the Major Work varies substantially from the draft version submitted earlier, these changes should be reflected in the journal. (e) The student and the supervising teacher ensure that any CDs, CD-ROMs, DVDs or films submitted to the Board of Studies are operable and conform to the specifications for the category

  14. The Major Work Journal During the development of the Major Work students are required to keep a process journal. The Major Work Journal must provide the following information: • a written statement containing a clear statement of intention agreed to by the student and the teacher/school • reflections pertaining to the development of the Major Work composition. The Major Work Journal documents the investigative process and the process of composition. The recording of research and analysis, and critical, imaginative and speculative reflections will assist students in achieving course objectives and outcomes and in preparing for internal and external assessment tasks. (The journal also has a role in establishing the authenticity of the Major Work.)

  15. The Major Work Journal It may also include: • method of approach • evidence of research and questioning • redrafts with reasons for any changes in direction • examples or indications of stimulus material and reflections on them in relation to the development of the Major Work composition • reflection on the extent to which intentions were achieved • reflections on the finished product • an annotated bibliography. The Major Work Journal must be submitted with the Major Work. The journal should be clearly labelled with the student number, school number, the name of the Major Work and its medium – print, sound, visual or multimedia (see below).

  16. Major Work Parameters The Major Work is an extended work or a body of work that complies with the prescribed word or time specifications. In some cases students will include visual images (either original or non-original material) as an integral part of the Major Work. Important: These will not be assessed on their artistic merit but on the contribution they make to the completed product. All aspects of the Major Work and Reflection Statement (regardless of media used) that are word-processed must conform to the following presentation requirements: They should be presented : • on A4 paper and must use double spacing. • Font should be size 12, Arial or Times New Roman. • Each page should be numbered.

  17. Cover Sheet & Bibliography Cover Sheet A cover sheet should be included with the school number; student number and title of the work(s). Bibliography The Board does not require the use of any particular system of referencing for bibliographies and footnotes. Care should be taken to use the selected system correctly and consistently. Word limits for the Major Work (see below) do not include the bibliography, footnotes or appendices. These need to be used judiciously and not as a means of expanding the work.

  18. The Reflection Statement The Reflection Statement is: Composed at the end of the composition process and is a reflection on the process and the completed product. It should be no less than 1000 words and no more than 1500. • It summarises the intention of the Major Work and the relationship it has with the extensive independent investigation • It must include an outline of the intended audience for the Major Work and the purpose for which it was composed. • It supports the Major Work, explaining the relationships of concept, structure, technical and language features and conventions. • It should explain the development of concepts during the process of composition, making • the links clear between independent investigation and the development of the finished • Product • It should indicate how the student realised the concepts in the final product. N.B. The Reflection Statement may be bound separately or at the end of the Major Work.

  19. Criteria for marking the English Extension 2 Major Work and Reflection Statement The Major Work and the Reflection Statement will be awarded separate marks, out of 40 and 10respectively. Major Work marking criteria • Textual integrity • Quality of insights and concepts, developed through independent investigation, and the communication of developed ideas • Manipulation of features that shape meaning and response and quality of engagement Reflection Statement marking criteria: • Explanation of the intended purpose and audience of the Major Work • Explanation of the impact of the extensive independent investigation (including course influences) • Evaluation of the relationships of concept, structure, technical and language features and conventions. Important: Your reflection statement should inform your work but your major work must stand on its own. At the marking centre the two works are marked together. Both will be read before allocating a mark out of 40 for the Major Work then the RS will be allocated a mark based on its qualities out of 10.

  20. The Reflection Statement: • summarises the intent of the work and the relationship it has with the extensive independent investigation • must include an outline of the intended audience for the Major Work and the purpose for which it was composed • supports the Major Work explaining the relationships of concept, structure, technical and language features and conventions • should explain the development of concepts during the process of composition making the links clear between independent investigationand the development of the finished product. should indicate how the student realised the concepts in the final product. It will therefore call on information that has been presented in each of the other three tasks in terms of intent, work in progress during the process of investigation and composition, and on information contained in the final report. • Responses from teachers and students to the three assessment tasks may assist students in formulating their reflection statement.

  21. The Major Work — Print Medium Short Story(ies) Students complete a short story or a selection of stories within a 6000 – 8000 word limit. The word limit does not include the Reflection Statement(1000-1500 words)

  22. HSC assessment grid for English Extension 2 • This assessment grid indicates the internal assessment of English Extension 2. It shows the three required tasks and the weighting requirements for each of the assessment components. • Schools may choose the timing of the tasks to suit their particular needs, being mindful that the tasks and weightings for each of the assessment components in the course are mandatory. • Below is the link to a suggested pattern for HSC School based assessment: This may be exactly what your teachers are doing with you. • http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/syllabus_hsc/english-ext2-assessment-schedule.html

  23. Important Dates for Ext II English • The date for completion of all written work and submission to your teacher is August 19th • The date by which these completed works are expected at the Board of Studies is August 24th

  24. Audiences for submitted works When developing performances and projects, students should be conscious of the various audiences for their work. Although a project or work may be developed with a particular audience in mind, there are other audiences who need to be considered. A principal audience for any HSC work is the marking team who, as experienced teachers, have been exposed to a wide range of styles and expressions in their discipline, and understand the nature of the subject and the medium. It is not expected, however, that markers should be confronted by works and performances that the general adult community would find offensive. Supervisors of Marking bring to the Board’s attention any examination responses that contain frivolous or gratuitously objectionable material. Candidates are required to address the published marking guidelines and ensure that the chosen form and medium are appropriate to the nature of the work.

  25. Audiences for submitted works Schools may decide that works developed for the HSC will be presented for public performance or display. • Principals must be assured that the works presented are appropriate to the understanding and expectations of the audience and their cultural sensitivity. Consideration could be given to modifying or withholding certain works from general public performance or display. Selecting works for HSC showcase events: In its showcase programs, the Board of Studies includes HSC works that reflect a range of topics, styles and forms. These works often include material and styles that: are innovative, risk-taking and original in approach. However, care must be taken to ensure that the content and presentation of the work is appropriate for a general audience that may include a wide range of community members including younger students. N.B. Some works may be deemed unsuitable in their original form for showcase programs, irrespective of the marks they have received.

  26. Audiences for submitted works • While it is understood that the nature of some performances and submitted works • challenges established views, principals should ensure that work submitted for the • examination does not cause offence. Teachers have a vital role in ensuring that the • principal is advised of the nature and content of HSC works from an early stage. In • this way the student’s work may develop in a manner which takes into account the • values and standards of the general community. http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/manuals/pdf_doc/advice_hsc_performance_05.pdf

  27. Links with the English (Advanced) and English Extension 1 courses Candidates compose a Major Work as an extension of the knowledge, understanding and skills developed in the English (Advanced) and English Extension 1 courses (p 92, English Stage 6 Syllabus). Candidates need to demonstrate that their work is an extension of their other English courses and not an imitation of the modules and electives studied. Better Major Works were characterised by: • experimentation with form based on research of contemporary short stories and literary theory • controlled writing, understated rather than melodramatic • a clear authentic voice • interesting range of topics, particularly in relation to setting and time frames • emotional engagement with the responder • evidence of greater background reading; not just within the HSC confines • original conceptsexplored with conviction • clearly drawn characters– an empathic understanding of human nature.

  28. PRINT MEDIUMShort Stories: General comments • Successful short stories were sustained responses that were insightful and competent in the use of language and were engaging to the audience. The most successful responses demonstrated insightful use of investigation and seamlessly integrated this into the Major Work. They developed an effective use of voice and had a strong narrative that was cohesive. • Candidates commonly used a variety of structural forms. They may have employed a single story or alternatively used a series of vignettes. While there is no obvious advantage of one over the other, successful candidates were capable of sustaining a thread through the work such that there was a sustained thematic or conceptual approach. • While some candidates were successful in composing with a postmodern approach there were those that branded their work postmodern, using this to veil a disjointed and incoherent Major Work. • There was generally a wide range of ideas explored including: • stories based in historical periods, eg WWI, 1800s

  29. Short Stories: General comments • stories regarding mental health issues; often lacking sufficient research • stories containing offensive and gratuitous violence with very little beyond the shock value • stories of family breakdown/violence/incest/multiple personality disorder • science fiction/fantasy genres • teen angst is still a common topic, but often inadequately investigated • a predominance of crime fiction, often with little research base • religious themes. • Candidates are reminded that independent investigation into the concept, form and style of the Major Work should be clearly demonstrated and detailed in the Reflection Statement. • Candidates are reminded that the short story should be substantially a prose work. While exploration of form can enhance a text, candidates should avoid including too much poetry or other text types which may interfere with engagement with the work.

  30. Short Story: Strengths • experimentation with form based on research of short stories and literary theory • controlled writing, understated rather than melodramatic • subtle expression of emotion and carefully nuanced character and plot development • many extraordinary emotional insights • interesting range of topics, particularly in relation to setting and time frames • evidence of interest in particular historical periods, which involved thorough research to create authentic narrative voices • effective attempts at humour • clear concept linked to audience and purpose, realised effectively through thoughtful manipulation of techniques • control of language, evocative imagery • concept appropriate for word length • pleasing evidence of range of theoretical bases in the work

  31. Short Story: Weaknesses Weaknesses • lacked an original idea or focus was a cliché • reliance on personal experience and consequently lacked depth or variety of approach • multiple voices were poorly handled • inadequate investigation into form • scant evidence of any connection to English course work • overwritten, verbose and ostentatious work in an attempt to impress • non-linear plot can be overdone, impacting negatively on meaning and coherence • postmodern attempts often disorganised, contrived and meaningless • lack of awareness of contexts to which the texts alluded, or little awareness of literary traditions/theory • inadequate or over long scripts • claims made in the Reflection Statement not always clearly evident in the Major Work

  32. Short Story: Weaknesses • narrow thematic and textual bounds affecting the depth and impact of the work • crime fiction led to a propensity for stereotyping, predictability and cliché • too ambitious with the scope of their work, attempting to be too ‘clever’, or to integrate too many critical theories/styles, rather than perhaps focusing on crafting a simple ‘human’ story • citing texts/material that had little or no impact on the work • use of footnotes when not needed • works which did not exhibit elements of a short story, eg biography, memoir • attaching annotated bibliographies which is not a course requirement and should be in the journal • inadequate journals which do not show engagement with investigation – downloads/photocopies simply pasted in is not sufficient to demonstrate process • general deterioration in the quality of writing (the mechanics) including: • problems with the use of prepositions • poor control of tense • words used imprecisely (apart from obvious malapropisms)