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I Pledge Allegiance

I Pledge Allegiance

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I Pledge Allegiance

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  1. I Pledge Allegiance Deuteronomy 23:21-23

  2. The Pledge was first written for school children in 1892 for Columbus Day.

  3. The Pledge was first written for school children in 1892 for Columbus Day. • It first appeared in print on September 8, 1892.

  4. The Pledge was first written for school children in 1892 for Columbus Day. • It first appeared in print on September 8, 1892. • It read: “I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands—one nation indivisible—with liberty and justice of for all.”

  5. The Pledge was first written for school children in 1892 for Columbus Day. • It first appeared in print on September 8, 1892. • It read: “I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands—one nation indivisible—with liberty and justice of for all.” • The author of the pledge was Francis Bellamy.

  6. The Pledge was first written for school children in 1892 for Columbus Day. • It first appeared in print on September 8, 1892. • It read: “I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands—one nation indivisible—with liberty and justice of for all.” • The author of the pledge was Francis Bellamy. • She wrote it for a one-time recitation on Columbus Day 1892.

  7. The Pledge was first written for school children in 1892 for Columbus Day. • It first appeared in print on September 8, 1892. • It read: “I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands—one nation indivisible—with liberty and justice of for all.” • The author of the pledge was Francis Bellamy. • She wrote it for a one-time recitation on Columbus Day 1892. • But, it became quite popular, became a Columbus Day tradition, & then began to be used in classrooms throughout the country.

  8. The Pledge of Allegiance has undergone two major revisions.

  9. The Pledge of Allegiance has undergone two major revisions. • In 1923, the National Flag Conference of the American Legion changed “my Flag” to “the Flag of the United States of America.”

  10. The Pledge of Allegiance has undergone two major revisions. • In 1923, the National Flag Conference of the American Legion changed “my Flag” to “the Flag of the United States of America.” • In 1954, amid fears of Communism, Dwight Eisenhower signed a bill to add the words “under God.”

  11. The Pledge of Allegiance has undergone two major revisions. • In 1923, the National Flag Conference of the American Legion changed “my Flag” to “the Flag of the United States of America.” • In 1954, amid fears of Communism, Dwight Eisenhower signed a bill to add the words “under God.” • We have each repeated that pledge countless times.

  12. The Pledge of Allegiance has undergone two major revisions. • In 1923, the National Flag Conference of the American Legion changed “my Flag” to “the Flag of the United States of America.” • In 1954, amid fears of Communism, Dwight Eisenhower signed a bill to add the words “under God.” • We have each repeated that pledge countless times. • We likely don’t even pause to contemplate the words’ meaning.

  13. The Pledge of Allegiance has undergone two major revisions. • In 1923, the National Flag Conference of the American Legion changed “my Flag” to “the Flag of the United States of America.” • In 1954, amid fears of Communism, Dwight Eisenhower signed a bill to add the words “under God.” • We have each repeated that pledge countless times. • We likely don’t even pause to contemplate the words’ meaning. • But, there are some pledges we dare not take lightly.

  14. The Pledge of Allegiance has undergone two major revisions. • In 1923, the National Flag Conference of the American Legion changed “my Flag” to “the Flag of the United States of America.” • In 1954, amid fears of Communism, Dwight Eisenhower signed a bill to add the words “under God.” • We have each repeated that pledge countless times. • We likely don’t even pause to contemplate the words’ meaning. • But, there are some pledges we dare not take lightly. • This morning, we want to explore what Moses taught about pledges & apply that teaching to today.

  15. Old Testament Pledges Deuteronomy 23:21-23

  16. The purpose of this Law is two-fold.

  17. One: This commandment points to the speed with which these vows were to be fulfilled.

  18. One: This commandment points to the speed with which these vows were to be fulfilled. • It does little good to pledge but never get around to fulfilling it.

  19. One: This commandment points to the speed with which these vows were to be fulfilled. • It does little good to pledge but never get around to fulfilling it. • God has no interest in delay.

  20. One: This commandment points to the speed with which these vows were to be fulfilled. • It does little good to pledge but never get around to fulfilling it. • God has no interest in delay. • We cannot delay in exhorting one another, lest our hearts become hard.

  21. One: This commandment points to the speed with which these vows were to be fulfilled. • It does little good to pledge but never get around to fulfilling it. • God has no interest in delay. • We cannot delay in exhorting one another, lest our hearts become hard: “Exhort one another every day, as long as it is called ‘today,’ that none of you may be hardened by the deceitfulness of sin” (Heb 3:13, ESV).

  22. One: This commandment points to the speed with which these vows were to be fulfilled. • It does little good to pledge but never get around to fulfilling it. • God has no interest in delay. • We cannot delay in exhorting one another, lest our hearts become hard: (Heb 3:13). • We cannot delay, for each day may be our last.

  23. One: This commandment points to the speed with which these vows were to be fulfilled. • It does little good to pledge but never get around to fulfilling it. • God has no interest in delay. • We cannot delay in exhorting one another, lest our hearts become hard: (Heb 3:13). • We cannot delay, for each day may be our last: “You do not know what tomorrow will bring. What is your life? For you are a mist that appears for a little time and then vanishes” (Js 4:14, ESV).

  24. Second: This commandment points out that these pledges are absolutely voluntary.

  25. Second: This commandment points out that these pledges are absolutely voluntary. • The one who does not vow is not guilty of sin, and any pledge that is made has been “voluntarily vowed to the LORD your God.”

  26. Second: This commandment points out that these pledges are absolutely voluntary. • The one who does not vow is not guilty of sin, and any pledge that is made has been “voluntarily vowed to the LORD your God.” • KJV: “That which is gone out of thy lips thou shalt keep and perform; even a freewill offering, according as thou hast vowed unto the LORD thy God” (v 23).

  27. Second: This commandment points out that these pledges are absolutely voluntary. • The one who does not vow is not guilty of sin, and any pledge that is made has been “voluntarily vowed to the LORD your God.” • KJV: “That which is gone out of thy lips thou shalt keep and perform; even a freewill offering, according as thou hast vowed unto the LORD thy God” (v 23). • The Hebrew term “a freewill offering” is often used in the Old Testament for a freewill offering.

  28. Second: This commandment points out that these pledges are absolutely voluntary. • The one who does not vow is not guilty of sin, and any pledge that is made has been “voluntarily vowed to the LORD your God.” • KJV: “That which is gone out of thy lips thou shalt keep and perform; even a freewill offering, according as thou hast vowed unto the LORD thy God” (v 23). • The Hebrew term “a freewill offering” is often used in the Old Testament for a freewill offering. • However, the term is also used for any act of service to God that is completely voluntary.

  29. Second: This commandment points out that these pledges are absolutely voluntary. • The one who does not vow is not guilty of sin, and any pledge that is made has been “voluntarily vowed to the LORD your God.” • KJV: “That which is gone out of thy lips thou shalt keep and perform; even a freewill offering, according as thou hast vowed unto the LORD thy God” (v 23). • Regardless of the precise translation, the meaning is abundantly clear: This is a vow you have voluntarily made to God.

  30. God continues to deal with us on a voluntary basis.

  31. God continues to deal with us on a voluntary basis. • “Behold, I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in to him and eat with him, and he with me” (Rev 3:20, ESV).

  32. God continues to deal with us on a voluntary basis. • “Behold, I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in to him and eat with him, and he with me” (Rev 3:20, ESV). • Jesus isn’t going to force us to open the door, but he stands there & knocks.

  33. God continues to deal with us on a voluntary basis. • “Behold, I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in to him and eat with him, and he with me” (Rev 3:20, ESV). • Jesus isn’t going to force us to open the door, but he stands there & knocks. • Granted, there are blessings for opening the door & dire consequences for refusing to do so.

  34. God continues to deal with us on a voluntary basis. • “Behold, I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in to him and eat with him, and he with me” (Rev 3:20, ESV). • Jesus isn’t going to force us to open the door, but he stands there & knocks. • Granted, there are blessings for opening the door & dire consequences for refusing to do so. But, the decision is fully ours.

  35. Each of us has a voluntary decision to make.

  36. Each of us has a voluntary decision to make. Shall we serve God?

  37. Our Pledge Baptism

  38. When we are baptized into Christ, we make a solemn vow to follow Jesus.

  39. When we are baptized into Christ, we make a solemn vow to follow Jesus. • “Baptism, which corresponds to this, now saves you, not as a removal of dirt from the body but as an appeal to God for a good conscience, through the resurrection of Jesus Christ” (1 Pet 3:21, ESV).

  40. When we are baptized into Christ, we make a solemn vow to follow Jesus. • “Baptism, which corresponds to this, now saves you, not as a removal of dirt from the body but as an appeal to God for a good conscience, through the resurrection of Jesus Christ” (1 Pet 3:21, ESV). • The phrase “an appeal to God for a good conscience” is difficult to translate.

  41. When we are baptized into Christ, we make a solemn vow to follow Jesus. • “Baptism, which corresponds to this, now saves you, not as a removal of dirt from the body but as an appeal to God for a good conscience, through the resurrection of Jesus Christ” (1 Pet 3:21, ESV). • The phrase “an appeal to God for a good conscience” is difficult to translate. • KJV: “the answer of a good conscience toward God.”

  42. When we are baptized into Christ, we make a solemn vow to follow Jesus. • “Baptism, which corresponds to this, now saves you, not as a removal of dirt from the body but as an appeal to God for a good conscience, through the resurrection of Jesus Christ” (1 Pet 3:21, ESV). • The phrase “an appeal to God for a good conscience” is difficult to translate. • KJV: “the answer of a good conscience toward God.” • NIV: “the pledge of a good conscience toward God.”

  43. Which translation is correct?

  44. Which translation is correct? • Does Peter envisions converts asking for a good conscience, answering from a good conscience, or pledging to serve God from a good conscience?

  45. Which translation is correct? • Does Peter envisions converts asking for a good conscience, answering from a good conscience, or pledging to serve God from a good conscience? • The KJV translates the term most literally.

  46. Which translation is correct? • Does Peter envisions converts asking for a good conscience, answering from a good conscience, or pledging to serve God from a good conscience? • The KJV translates the term most literally. • The term Peter uses here does mean “answer.”

  47. Which translation is correct? • Does Peter envisions converts asking for a good conscience, answering from a good conscience, or pledging to serve God from a good conscience? • The KJV translates the term most literally. • The term Peter uses here does mean “answer.” • But, it really seems that boththe KJV & NIV get it correct.

  48. In Peter’s day, the word he uses meant far more than simply answering a question.

  49. In Peter’s day, the word he uses meant far more than simply answering a question. • This is the only occurrence of the term in the New Testament.