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Relationships between mindfulness, emotional distress and subjective wellbeing: are these underpinned by enhanced decentring and diminished recurrent negative thinking?. Beverley Clack Research Associate Dr Jen Unwin Dr Alistair Smith

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Relationships between mindfulness, emotional distress and subjective wellbeing: are these underpinned by enhanced decentring and diminished recurrent negative thinking?

  • Beverley Clack
  • Research Associate
  • Dr Jen UnwinDr Alistair Smith
  • Consultant Clinical & Health Psychologist Clinical Psychologist
mindfulness
Mindfulness

Paying attention in a particular way: on purpose,

in the present moment, and non-judgmentally

(Kabat-Zinn, 1994)

mechanisms of action
Mechanisms of Action
  • Models of mechanisms of action (Grabovac, Lau & Willett, 2011)
  • Overlap: Decentring and Recurrent negative thinking (RNT)
  • Empirical evidence
  • Subjective wellbeing
    • Positive and negative affect and hedonic treadmill
method
Method
  • Ethical approval
  • Online questionnaire (n = 539)
  • Questionnaire design
    • FFMQ, EQ, RRQ, PSWQ, DASS-21, PANAS (PA), SWLS
  • Analysis: Structural equation modelling - path analysis (maximum likelihood estimation)
results 1
Results 1
  • Means and Correlations reflecting previous research
  • Hypothesised model: Acceptable though not good fit to data: Χ2(5) = 21.48; p< 0.001; CFI = .99; SRMR = 0.02; and RMSEA = .08 (Confidence Intervals: .05 to .11; p > .05).
  • Built-up model: Χ2(4) = 7.09; p> .05; CFI = .99; SRMR = 0.01; and RMSEA = .04 (Confidence Intervals: .00 to .08; p = .61
implications research
Implications: Research
  • Some support for models of mechanisms of action
    • Only study to examine decentring empirically (cf. Coffey & Hartman, 2008)
    • Only study to examine decentring and RNT simultaneously (Coffey & Hartman, 2008; rumination; Roemer & Orsillo, 2002; worry
  • Transdiagnostic mechanism of action
    • But decentring as important for mood
  • Subjective wellbeing
    • Mechanisms of action not formally explicated or examined but desire discrepancy via decentring and positive affect
    • Useful approach
limitations future directions
Limitations & Future Directions
  • Sampling
  • Self-report (positive wording and self-kindness)
  • SEM
    • Linearity – e.g. stress
    • Causality
    • Indirect effects - specific
    • Future design (facets, pre- post) & self-kindness