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Incident Command System Overview CANUSLANT Incident Management Workshop Portland, ME – May 15, 2007 LCDR Matt McCann PowerPoint Presentation
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Incident Command System Overview CANUSLANT Incident Management Workshop Portland, ME – May 15, 2007 LCDR Matt McCann. Objectives. Wrap weeks of emergency management command/control training into 45 minutes! 1. National policy mandates 2. Incident Command System for executives

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Incident Command System OverviewCANUSLANT Incident Management WorkshopPortland, ME – May 15, 2007LCDR Matt McCann

objectives
Objectives

Wrap weeks of emergency management

command/control training into 45 minutes!

1. National policy mandates

2. Incident Command System for executives

3. ICS/Response Management System (RMS) linkages

federal coordinating structures
Federal Coordinating Structures

Legislation: The Homeland Security Act of 2002,

and Homeland Security Presidential Directives 5/8

NRP: Establishes Federal coordination structures/mechanisms, directs incorporation of existing plans, and provides a consistent approach to managing incidents.

NIMS: Standardizes incident management processes, protocols, training, and procedures for use by all responders.

national response plan
National Response Plan
  • Builds on what worked from previous plans and incident responses
  • Forges new approaches and mechanisms to address today’s threats
  • Establishes a national incident management capability
  • Addresses the complete spectrum of incident management activities
  • Uses National Incident Management System (NIMS) Incident Command System
nrp construction
NRP Construction

Key concepts

  • National Operations Center (was HSOC)
  • Interagency Advisory Council (was IIMG)
  • Principal Federal Official
  • Joint Field Office

Fully Incorporates

  • Federal Response Plan
  • Domestic Terrorism Concept of Ops Plan
  • Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan
  • National Contingency Plan

Integrates

  • Other national-level contingency plans

Foundation: National Incident Management System

nims components
NIMS Components
  • Command and Management
    • Organizational systems
  • Preparedness
    • Planning/training/drills/exercises/mutual aid
  • Resource Management
  • Communications/Information Management
  • Supporting Technologies
  • Ongoing Management and Maintenance
    • NIMS Integration Center (NIC)
federal response concept
Federal Response Concept
  • Incidents handled at lowest possible organizational level
  • DHS receives notification of actual and potential incidents
    • “Top-down” or “bottom-up” approach
  • Consultation/coordination amongst departments/agencies to:
    • Assess national implications
    • Determine need for full or partial NRP activation
  • Coordinating structures activated to provide unified, standardized approach for implementing Federal incident management responsibilities:
    • Direct implementation of Federal authorities
    • Federal support to State, local and tribal governments
    • Federal-to-Federal support
    • Proactive response to catastrophic incidents
  • Coordinating structures provide national capability
    • Ability to address impacts, execute immediate nation-wide actions to avert or prepare for subsequent events and manage multiple incidents
ics program history
ICS Program History
  • Born in the Vietnam War, but attributed to Southern California wildfires in 1970s
  • Recognized need for common emergency response system due to responder fatalities
  • Mandated all-risk application and initially evaluated in the wild land fire environment
  • Design objective includes all levels of government, including executives
incident command system
Incident Command System

Designed to turn a crisis from an emergency phase to a project phase

as quickly as possible - From reactive to proactive.

Key features:

  • Modular Organization - highly structured yet flexible
  • Manageable Span of Control
  • Standard Terminology / Forms / Symbols
  • Chain of Command Structure
  • Consolidated Action Plan “All Hazards, All Risks”
  • Structured Resource Management System
  • Established Curriculum
  • Available at Low Cost
  • Commonly Used Nationwide
  • Logical/Functional
  • Common Incident Support Facilities
  • Integrated Communications
  • Management by Objectives
  • Personnel Accountability
why did l etats unis adopt ics
Why did L’Etats Unis adopt ICS?
  • On-scene incident management structure
  • System generally being used by first responders to manage incidents
  • Training & exercise program
  • Certification & qualification system
  • Support technologies
  • System documentation
nims ics national training curriculum baseline

#2

Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives

#6

Common Responsibilities

#2

Basic Features of ICS

#1

Purpose of ICS

#3

Incident Commander & Command Staff Positions

#4

General Staff Functions

NIMS Introduction

#1

Leadership & Management

NRP Introduction

#3

Functional Areas & Positions

#5

Facilities

#5

Organizational Flexibility

#6

Transfer of Command

#1

ICS Fundamentals Review

#4

Briefings

#2

Unified Command

#3

Assessment & Agency Guidance Establishing Objectives

#4

Incident Resources Management

#5

Planning Process

#6

Demob, Transfer of Command & Close Out

NIMS ICS National Training Curriculum Baseline

LEVEL

IS-700

IS-800

Basic

ICS-100

Basic

ICS-200

Intermediate

ICS-300

ics applied
ICS Applied
  • Agency/organization executives have vital role
  • All-risk system knows no bounds if properly applied
  • To be effective it must have:
    • Strong agency support
    • Thorough system documentation
    • Intensive training and exercises
    • Evaluation/corrective action process
  • System has never failed
uscg application examples
USCG Application Examples
  • Oil spill/HAZMAT response and recovery
  • Multi-casualty
  • Port Security
  • Water transportation or private sector accidents
  • Planned marine or waterside events
  • Terrorism response
  • Designated Emergency Support Function
factors determining response size structure
Factors Determining Response Size & Structure

Administrative/jurisdictional complexity

Geographic area involved

Functional specialties required

Logistics/support, planning needs

Potential for growth

basic ics organization
Basic ICS Organization

IC

CommandStaff

Information

Liaison

Safety

Legal

Intelligence

Planning

Operations

Logistics

Finance

* Resources

* Situation

* Demobilization

* Documentation

* Staging Area

* Branches

* Divisions

* Groups

* Communications

* Food

* Medical

* Supply

* Ground Support

* Facilities

* Procurement

* Claims

* Time

* Cost

* Compensation

response priorities
Response Priorities

Incident objectives are established

based on the following priorities:

#1: Life Saving

#2: Incident Stabilization

#3: Property Preservation

management by objectives
Top down management activity with the following

steps to achieve incident response goals:

Establish objectives

Identify/select strategies

Develop/implement tactics

Management by Objectives
ics management
ICS Management

ICS span of control for any supervisor:

  • Between 3 and 7 subordinates.
  • Optimally does not exceed 5 subordinates.
resource planning characteristics
Resource/Planning Characteristics

Written Incident Action Plans are produced when:

  • Large number of tactical and support resources need to be ordered, tracked and managed.
  • Multiple operational periods are required.
  • Transfer of command is likely.
  • Or…the boss wants one.
slide21

Preparing for the Planning Meeting

Tactics Meeting

Planning

Meeting

Preparing for the Tactics Meeting

IAP Prep

&

Approval

Command &

General Staff

Meeting /Briefing

Operations

Briefing

IC / UC Develop/Update

Objectives

Meeting

New Ops

Period

Begins

Execute Plan & Assess Progress

Initial UC

Meeting

Incident Brief

ICS-201

Initial Response

& Assessment

Initial Response

Notification

Incident/Event

Planning “P”

  • Deliberate Planning Cycle/Process
  • Complete a set of actions from Incident Action Plan
  • Operational period: Normally 12 - 24 hours
  • Determined by Incident Commander
resource management
Resource Management
  • Maximizes effective use of personnel and equipment.
  • Reduces span of control.
  • Reduces communications traffic.
  • Process to categorize/track resources ordered, dispatched, recovered and demobilized.
  • Includes processes for reimbursement, as appropriate.
ics summary
ICS Summary

Utilizes management features including common terminology

and a modular organizational structure.

Emphasizes effective planning through management by

objectives and Incident Action Plans.

Supports responders by providing needed data through

effective information and intelligence management.

Utilizes principles of chain, unity and transfer of command.

Ensures ready resources through accountability/mobilization.

Ensures utilization of incident resources by maintaining a span

of control, establishing incident facilities, implementing resource

management practices and ensuring integrated communications.

what are major incidents
Involve more than one agency and/or political jurisdiction.

Involve complex management and communication issues.

Require experienced, highly qualified supervisory personnel.

Require numerous tactical and support resources.

Involve multiple victims, fatalities, or illnesses.

Include widespread damage to property/environment.

Result in psychological threat/trauma.

Span multiple operational periods (days, weeks).

Costly to control and mitigate.

Require extensive recovery efforts.

Draw national media interest.

Designated an Incident of National Significance.

What Are Major Incidents?
incident of national significance
Incident Of National Significance

IONS are declared by the Secretary for the Department of Homeland Security,

but Federal incident management activities are coordinated by the President

unless delegated under the following HSPD-5 criteria:

  • When a Federal department/agency requests assistance.
  • When state/local capabilities are overwhelmed and they request assistance.
  • When an incident substantially involves more than one Federal agency.
  • When DHS has been directed by the President to assume incident

management responsibilities.

area command functions
Area Command Functions

Directs multiple responses handled by ICS organizations; or a large incident

with multiple response teams assigned.

  • Provide agency/jurisdictional authority for assigned incidents.
  • Ensure a clear understanding of expectations, intentions, and constraints.
  • Establish critical resource efficient use priorities between incidents.
  • Ensure responder assignments are appropriate.
  • Coordinate demobilization or reassignment of resources between incidents.
  • Assists in interagency coordination.
  • Reduces workload for agency officials.
area commander responsibilities
Set overall objectives.

Establish priorities.

Allocate/reallocate critical resources.

Coordinate with higher entities and

the media….think ‘buffer’.

Coordinate the demobilization of

assigned resources.

Does not direct tactical operations.

Area Commander Responsibilities

ICP

ICP

multi agency coordination system
Multi-agency Coordination System

A combination of facilities, equipment, personnel,

procedures, and communications integrated into a

common system with responsibility for coordinating

and supporting incident management activities.

why focus on coordination
Increasing incident complexity

Complex and confusing legal authorities

Increasing litigation

Increasing response costs

High property losses

Life, health, safety issues

Media and public scrutiny

Political, legislative and budgetary ramifications

Competing priorities

Why Focus on Coordination?
multi agency coordination centers
Multi-agency Coordination Centers

Local

Emergency

Ops Center

(EOC)

State

Emergency

Ops Center

(EOC)

Joint FieldOffice

(JFO)

  • Provide support and coordination to incident command.
  • Identify resource shortages and issues.
  • Gather and provide information.
  • Implement multiagency coordination entity decisions.

Area Command

Incident Command Post

Incident Command Post

Incident Command Post

expansion vs activation
Expansion vs. Activation

Multi-agency coordination centers/entities may be

established through:

Expanding an existing function that includes

full-time staff and pre-emergency administrative

systems and controls.

Or

Activating a structure based on interagency

mutual-aid agreements during an emergency.

activating coordination centers
Activating Coordination Centers
  • When an emergency situation threatens, significantly impacts the agency, or involves other agencies
  • When pre-established threat levels are reached
  • Under pre-established guidelines (recommended)
    • Joint powers agreements or memorandums of understanding
    • Jurisdictional response plans
    • Without pre-established guidelines
    • When there is an interagency need to coordinate
    • When resource requests exceed availability
joint field office
Joint Field Office

Focal coordination point for Federal support to on-scene incident management efforts (Federal MACC).

Principal Federal Official

Other Senior Federal Officials

State, Local and Tribal Representative(s)

Senior Federal Law Enforcement Official

Federal Coordinating Officer

JFO Coordination Group

Chief of Staff

-----------------------

Liaison Officer

Safety Coordinator

Security Officer

Infrastructure LiaisonOthers as needed

External Affairs

JFO Coordination Staff

Defense Coordinating Officer (DCO)

Office of Inspector General

JFO Sections

Operations Section

Logistics Section

Planning Section

Finance and Admin

nrp coordination structure

NationalLevel

Regional Level

Field Level

NRP Coordination Structure

NIMS Role

Multi-agency Coordination System

Interagency Advisory Council

JFO Coordination Group

  • Multiagency Coordination Entity
  • Strategic coordination
  • Multi-agency Coordination Centers/EOCs
  • Support and coordination

Joint Field Office

Regional Response Coordination Center

National Operations Center

Local Emergency Operations Center

State Emergency Operations Center

  • Incident Command
  • Directing on-scene emergency management

Role of regional components varies depending on scope and magnitude of the incident.

An Area Command is established when needed due to the complexity or number of incidents.

Area

Command

Incident Command Post

Incident Command Post

Incident Command Post

coordinated planning

Preparing for the Planning Meeting

Tactics Meeting

Planning

Meeting

Preparing for the Tactics Meeting

IAP Prep

&

Approval

Command &

General Staff

Meeting /Briefing

Operations

Briefing

IC / UC Develop/Update

Objectives

Meeting

New Ops

Period

Begins

Execute Plan & Assess Progress

Initial UC

Meeting

Incident Brief

ICS-201

Initial Response

& Assessment

Initial Response

Notification

Incident/Event

RMS #8

Planning

Meeting

RMS #17

Operations

Meeting

Coordinated Planning

RMS #7

Form Flow

Process

RMS #6

IAP Completion

& Sub-Plan

Development

RMS #10

Task ID

& Logistics

Facilitation

RMS #18

Strategy

Meeting

RMS #5

Initial IAP

Development

RMS #12

Pre-implement

Debrief

RMS #19

Initiation of

IAP

Development

RMS #4

Initial Strategy

Meeting

RMS #9

Post IAP

Debrief

RMS #11

Post Logistics

Debrief

RMS #3

Initial Response

RMS #13

IAP Implemented

RMS #14

Post Operations

Debrief

RMS #15

Expenditures

RMS #2

Initial Objectives

RMS #16

Total

Expenditures

RMS #1

Incident &

Notification

jurisdictionally transparent functions
Jurisdictionally Transparent Functions

The Joint Information Center is used to

coordinate emergency information, crisis

communications and public affairs functions;

must include representatives of all stakeholders.

Technical Specialists are personnel with special

skills who can be used anywhere within a

response organization.

trans boundary personnel
Trans-boundary Personnel
  • Joint Response Team advisory personnel not filling On Scene/ Incident Commander roles as per Section 304.5 of the JMPCP provide a variety of counseling and debriefing support.
  • Liaison Officers can be requested as per Section 404 of the JMPCP at both Incident Command Posts.
  • Public Information Officers and Communications Officers working at a (Joint) Information Center.
  • Regional Environmental Emergency Team and Environmental Unit Leader and/or Technical Specialists working at either Command Post location.
  • Representatives of the Responsible Party, if applicable.