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Growing Herbs in North Texas. Definition of an Herb. Two distinct meanings of the word ‘herb’: A non-woody plant, from which we get the term ‘herbaceous’. Any plant that has therapeutic properties. Although we tend to think of herbs as small, aromatic plants such as parsley and thyme, they

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Growing Herbs in North Texas


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    1. Growing Herbs in North Texas

    2. Definition of an Herb Two distinct meanings of the word ‘herb’: • A non-woody plant, from which we get the term ‘herbaceous’. • Any plant that has therapeutic properties.

    3. Although we tend to think of herbs as small, aromatic plants such as parsley and thyme, they include a very wide range of plants from annuals, biennials and herbaceous perennials to trees, shrubs, climbers and primitive plants such as ferns and mosses. Some herbs are not especially aromatic, and others may even smell unpleasant; for example, a boxwood hedge after clipping.” - DeniBown, Growing Herbs

    4. Most Asked Question About Herbs How do you pronounce the word “herb”? Is the ‘H’ emphasized or not? The answer is that it depends upon where you live. In England, the British emphasize the ‘H’. In America, the “H”is swallowed. ‘Erb’ is what some say.

    5. Why Grow Your Own Herbs? • Easy to Grow • Resilient • Attract Bees and Butterflies • Essential Oils Confuse Pests

    6. Why Grow Your Own Herbs? • An Herb for Every Situation • Good for your Health • Economical • Reduces your Carbon Footprint • Herbs are Beautiful

    7. Useful Parts FOLIAGEis the most commonly used part of an herb. FLOWERSare used extensively for the distilling of essential oils, and some flowers can be added to food.

    8. SEEDS, BERRIES and FRUITS are used in cooking or for making teas. STEMSare the parts of the plant visible above the ground. ROOTS, TUBERS AND BULBS refer to the parts below the ground.

    9. Proven HorticulturalPractices • Soil Preparation • Mulch • Sunlight • Water • Fertilizing • Pruning • Harvesting

    10. Think Organic • Use Natural Materials • Improve and Maintain Soil Fertility • Encourage Diversity • Select Adapted Plants • You may be eating your herbs!

    11. Location • More Important than Looks • Convenient to Harvest • Adequate Sunlight

    12. Soil Preparation • Raised Beds • Organic Matter • Expanded Shale

    13. Mulch • Controls Weeds • Prevents Erosion and Soil Compaction • Conserves Water • Prevents Crusting of Soil

    14. Mulch • Regulates Soil Temperature • Keeps Plants Cleaner • Adds Nutrients to Soil Mediterranean Herbs Benefit from a Mulch of Pea Gravel

    15. Light • At Least Half Day of Sun • Preferably Morning Light with Afternoon Protection • Some Herbs Tolerate Shade

    16. Herbs ThatTolerate Shade • Bergamot • Chervil • Chives • Lemon Balm • Lemon Verbena • Mints • Parsley • Pineapple Sage • St. John’s Wort • Tarragon • Violets

    17. Water • Wet Soil Thoroughly • Allow to Dry Between Watering • Group Plants According to Water Needs • Apply Water at the Root Zone • Rainwater

    18. Fertilizing • Amended Garden Soil Provides Nutrients • Encourages Healthy Growth • Avoid High Nitrogen • Slow Release, Organic Heavy Feeders: Basil and Chives

    19. Pruning • Allow Herbs to Settle In • Selective Pruning • Pinch Pruning • Sharp Tools • Practice Good Hygiene

    20. Harvesting • At Season End • Specific to the Herb • Early in the Morning • Annual Herbs • Perennial Herbs

    21. Annual Herbs An annual plant is one whose complete cycle of development from germination of the seed through flowering and death occurs in a single growing season.

    22. Annual Herbs • Basil • Borage • Calendula • Cilantro • Dill • Fennel • Nigella • Pelargoniums

    23. Biennial Herbs A biennial plant is one that requires two seasons to complete its growth cycle, usually generating vegetative growth the first year, then flowering, fruiting and dying in the second.

    24. Biennial Herbs • Caraway • Chervil • Mullein • Parsley

    25. Perennial Herbs A perennial plant is one that continues the cycle of new growth, flowering and fruiting for at least three years.

    26. Tender Perennial Herbs • Lemon Verbena • Pineapple Sage • Tarragon

    27. Perennial Herbs • Bay • Bergamot • Catmint • Chives • Echinacea • Fennel • Hyssop • Lavender • Lemon Balm • Mints • Oregano • Rosemary • Roses • Sage • Savory, Winter • St. John’s Wort • Tarragon • Violets

    28. Essential Culinary Herbs • Basil • Bay • Chives • Cilantro • Dill • Fennel • Lavender • Lemon Balm • Lemon Verbena

    29. EssentialCulinary Herbs • Marjoram • Mints • Oregano • Parsley • Rosemary • Sage • Savory, Winter • Thyme

    30. Water MiserHerbs Gardening with little or no supplemental water • Aloe Vera • Artemisia • Lamb’s Ear • Mullein • Oregano • Rosemary • Rue • Sage • Skullcap • Thyme

    31. Grey and Silver Herbs • Artemisia • Germander • Lamb’s Ear • Lavender • Mullein • Rue • Sage • Santolina

    32. Herbs for Containers • Containers can be Moved as Needed • Sun/Shade • Protection from Harsh Temperatures • You Control the Environment • Invasive Herbs can be Controlled • Convenient Height for Ease of Maintenance

    33. Container Gardening Basics • Use Commercial Soilless Mixes • Check Daily for Water Needs • Fertilize more Frequently • Group Plants with the Same Needs Together • Graduate Plants to Larger Containers as they Grow

    34. Container Gardening Basics • Tall, Medium and Cascading • Mix with Annuals and Bulbs • Protect Containers from Temperature Extremes • Mulch

    35. Herbs for containers • Bay • Lavender • Lemongrass • Lemon Verbena • Pansies • Pelargoniums • Rosemary • Sage • Thyme • Ginger

    36. Growing Herbs Indoors • Generally Not Recommended • Sunny Window or Artificial Light Source • Selective Pruning/Pinching • Water Judiciously • Potential Pest Problems

    37. Herbs to Grow Indoors • Basil • Bay • Chives • Dill • Lavender • Lemon Verbena • Oregano • Parsley • Pelargoniums • Rosemary • Sage • Thyme

    38. Growing Herbs From Seed Economical Greater Selection • Basil • Borage • Caraway • Cilantro • Dill • Fennel • Nigella • Parsley • Poppy

    39. Works Cited • Bown, Deni. The Herb Society of America Encyclopedia of Herbs & Their Uses. London, Dorling Kindersley Limited, 1995 • Bown, Deni. Growing Herbs. London, Dorling Kindersley Limited, 1995. • Foley, Caroline, Jill Nice and Marcus A. Webb. New Herb Bible. London, Quintet Publishing Limited, 2002 • Harding, Jennie. The Herb Bible. New York, Barnes and Noble, 2005. • Hill, Madalene and Gwen Barclay. Southern Herb Growing. Fredericksburg: Shearer Publishing, 1987

    40. Works Cited • Kowalchik, Claire and William H. Hylton. Rodale’s Illustrated Encyclopedia of Herbs. Emmaus, Rodale Press, 1987 • McVickar, Jekka. The Complete Herb Book. London: Kyle Cathie Limited, 1994 • Roth, Sally. The Successful Herb Gardener. New York, NY: Hearst Books, 2001. • Schlosser, Katherine K. The Herb Society of America’s Essential Guide to Growing and Cooking with Herbs. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2007 • www.aggie.horticulture.tamu.edu • www.garden-herbs.com • www.lsuagcenter.com