BlindAid: a Virtual Exploration Tool for People who are Blind - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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BlindAid: a Virtual Exploration Tool for People who are Blind

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  1. BlindAid: a Virtual Exploration Tool for People who are Blind O. Lahav, Ph.D., D. Schloerb, Ph.D., S. Kumar, and M. A. Srinivasan, Ph.D Touch Lab, RLE, MIT CT13, San Diego, June 2008

  2. The Theory Spatial cognitive map Blinds’ exploration Knowledge technology

  3. The Theory Blinds’ cognitive map Spatial cognitive map Blinds’ exploration Knowledge technology KT devices for spatial cognitive mapping O&M KT devices for blind

  4. BlindAid System 2004 - present (NEI - R21)

  5. Research Aims Design and develop a VE system for users who are blind Conduct experiments on the usability of the VE system

  6. BlindAid System - Conclusion Avoid overload processing Clear Back to simple Intuitive Based on previous knowledge

  7. The Learning Mode –User Interface

  8. The Learning Mode – Researcher Interface

  9. Methodology– Participants The study included four total blind participants 41-53 years old; one participant was congenitally blind; one was female

  10. Methodology– Research Instruments Implementation Instruments: Unknown simulated space (13 virtual environments) Exploration task Collection of the Data Instruments: Observations Usability questionnaire Open interview Modeling kit Computer log

  11. Research Studies First study - Haptic properties Second study - Audio properties Third study - Exploration tools

  12. First Study– Haptic Properties Which haptic feedback properties used in the VE strongly affected people who are blind? The VE consisted of 20 objects of three types: Different stiffness properties ‘S’ (soft-hard) Different texture properties ‘T’ (smooth-rigid) Different stiffness+texture properties ‘S+T’

  13. First Study– Haptic Properties Seven objects randomly chosen over six VEs

  14. First Study– Haptic Properties– Result All participants preferred objects with ‘S’ properties then ‘T’ or ‘S+T’ properties All seven ‘S’ objects were listed as preferable Participants preferred objects with ‘T’ properties only with large height irrespective of the type of bump

  15. First Study– Haptic Properties– Result All participants preferred a limited number of feedbacks: Different haptic feedbacks (wall,window, and door) Hard objects and soft objects Designation of area or objects with safety issues

  16. Second Study - Audio Properties Which audio feedback properties used in the VE strongly affected people who are blind? Audio type: mono, stereo, or stereo with rotation Component’s description: short or long Hearcon versa audio-labeled Background sound

  17. Second Study– Audio Properties Six VEs

  18. Second Study– Audio Properties– Result Three participants chose stereo. Stereo helped them determine which direction to go and provided more orientation to the overall space. The stereo-rotation was an additional variable that they needed to track. They continually needed to imagine their orientation at the time they heard the audio feedback.

  19. Second Study– Audio Properties– Result The short component’s description and hearcon need to be clear, recognizable, and short, without the need to process it. The ability to have background sound (e.g., street noise) continuously with the stereo effect was effective and needed. The participants did not report feeling overloaded by the audio effect or try to avoid interaction with the VE components.

  20. Third Study– Exploration Tools What are the exploration tools that maximized the participants’ exploration performance in the VE? Move the VE workspace: Using the arrow keys Using the phantom button Install and recall landmarks by: User Researcher Zoom in - Zoom out (eliminate objects)

  21. Third Study– Exploration Tools

  22. Third Study– Exploration Tools– Result Each of the four participants chose to use the phantom button: Much more intuitive and a natural motion for the participants More immediately associated with the white cane Sense of having control over movements Did not have to take their hands off the Phantom Able to drag the workspace at an angle In a complex VE the participants used mostly their own landmarks, and they usually installed two of their own.

  23. BlindAid System - Conclusion Avoid overload processing Clear Back to simple Intuitive and a natural Based on previous knowledge

  24. BlindAid System - Future To Collect spatial information in advance (Mapquest) Integrating the system in traditional O&M trainee

  25. BlindAid System – Acknowledgments The participants NIH / NEI - R21 Jay Desloge Carroll Center for the Blind