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Strategies YOU can use for behaviour management

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Strategies YOU can use for behaviour management

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  1. Strategies YOU can use for behaviour management (A fresh look at behaviour management in schools picture, n.d.) ETL111- Assignment 2 Alannah Filipovich – s226242

  2. What is behaviour management? • “Reduces troublesome behaviour” • Managing class or individual behaviour • Reduces stress for teachers (How to manage behaviour in the classroom picture, n.d.)

  3. Transitions • Between classes, lessons & breaks Overview • Routines • Predictability • Day plan, goal setting & transparency • Behaviourmanagement • Verbal • 5L’s & attention grabbers • Cues • Non-verbal • Expressions & online devices

  4. Transitions • Between classes • Between lessons • After breaks (Classroom starter kit picture, n.d.)

  5. Predictability • Daily routine • Transparency • Time to get sorted (Morning routines picture, n.d.)

  6. Predictability • Teacher chair/desk • Goal setting • Self evaluation (Stepping stones to positive relationships picture, n.d.)

  7. Routines-Other Ideas • Talk quietly • Use student as indicator • Day planner • Student responsibilities (How to create your own teacher binder picture, n.d.)

  8. Verbal Cues • “Stop, look and listen” • “Show the 5 L’s” • Countdown • Closed requests (5L’s of listening picture, n.d.)

  9. Non-verbal Cues • Facial expressions • Body language • Class Dojo (Management of behaviour picture, n.d.) (Class Dojo picture, n.d.)

  10. Summary • Establish routines • Utilise verbal and non-verbal cues • Stay calm! (Teaching secrets picture, n.d.)

  11. Thanks for listening! Any questions? (Dog listening picture, n.d.)

  12. References • Department of Education. (2013). Policies-Behaviour management in schools. Retrieved from: http://det.wa.edu.au/policies/detcms/policy-planning-and-accountability/policies-framework/policies/behaviour-management-in-schools.en?bbp.s=9&bbp.e=select&bbp.v=1&bbp.i=d0.m.1&bbp.8.policyID=13876179&g11n.enc=UTF-8&bbp.9.pane=0. • Dix, P. (2010). How to manage behaviour in the classroom, Mortarboard blog. Retrieved from: http://www.pivotaleducation.com/. • Hattie, J. & Timperley, H. (2007). The power of feedback. Review of educational research, 77(1), 81-112.doi: 10.3102/003465430298487. • Klenowski, V. (1995). Student self-evaluation processes in student-centred teaching and learning contexts of Australia and England. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy & Practice, 2(2), 145-163. doi: 10.1080/0969594950020203. • Leinhardt, G. and Greeno, J.G. (1986). The cognitive skill of teaching. Journal of Educational Psychology, 78(2), 75-95. doi: 10.1037/0022-0663.78.2.75. • Merret, F. and Wheldall, K. (2006). How do teachers learn to manage classroom behaviour? A study of teacher’s opinions about their initial training with special reference to classroom behaviour management. Retrieved from: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0305569930190106. • Richards, J.H. (1987). Time management-a review. Work & Stress: An International Journal of Work, Health & Organisations, 73-78. doi:10.1080/02678378708258485.