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UNIT 4 Chapter 20 – Postwar Social Change Chapter 21 – Politics and Prosperity . THE ROARIN 20’s. America: Pathways to the Present. Chapter 20. Postwar Social Change (1920–1929). OBJECTIVES.

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unit 4 chapter 20 postwar social change chapter 21 politics and prosperity

UNIT 4Chapter 20 – Postwar Social ChangeChapter 21 – Politics and Prosperity

THE ROARIN 20’s

slide2
America: Pathways to the Present

Chapter 20

Postwar Social Change

(1920–1929)

objectives
OBJECTIVES
  • CORE OBJECTIVE: Explain the social, political, and economic impacts on the United States after World War I.
    • Objective 5.2:How did mass media, jazz, and literature affect American life in the 1920’s?
  • THEME:
presidents of the united states
Presidents of the United States
  • #21 - …
    • Chester A. Arthur; Republican (1881)
  • Grover Cleveland; Democrat (1884)
  • Benjamin Harrison; Republican (1888)
  • Grover Cleveland; Democrat (1892)
  • William McKinley; Republican (1896)
  • Theodore Roosevelt; Republican (1901)
  • William Howard Taft; Republican (1908)
  • Woodrow Wilson; Democrat (1912)
  • Warren G. Harding; Republican (1920)
  • Calvin Coolidge; Republican (1923)
  • Herbert Hoover; Republican (1928)
  • George Washington; Federalist (1788)
  • John Adams; Federalist (1796)
  • Thomas Jefferson (1800)
  • James Madison (1808)
  • James Monroe (1816)
  • John Quincy Adams (1824)
  • Andrew Jackson; Democrat (1828)
  • Martin Van Buren; Democrat (1836)
  • William Henry Harrison; Whig (1840)
  • John Tyler; Whig (1841)
  • James K. Polk; Democrat (1844)
  • Zachary Taylor; Whig (1848)
  • Millard Fillmore; Whig (1850)
  • Franklin Pierce; Democrat (1852)
  • James Buchanan; Democrat (1856)
  • Abraham Lincoln; Republican (1860)
  • Andrew Johnson; Democrat (1865)
  • Ulysses S. Grant; Republican (1868)
  • Rutherford B. Hayes; Republican (1876)
  • James Garfield; Republican (1880)
slide5
America: Pathways to the Present

Chapter 20: Postwar Social Change (1920–1929)

Section 1: Society in the 1920s

Section 2: Mass Media and the Jazz Age

Section 3: Cultural Conflicts

mass media and the jazz age

Mass Media and the Jazz Age

CHAPTER 20 SECTION 2

the mass media
WRITE THIS DOWN!The Mass Media
  • Growth of the mass media, instruments for communicating with large numbers of people, helped form a common American popular culture during the 1920’s.
  • The popularity of motion pictures grew throughout the 1920s; “talkies,” or movies with sound, were introduced in 1927.
  • Newspapers grew in both size and circulation.
    • Tabloids, compact papers which replaced serious news with entertainment, became popular.
    • Magazines also became widely read.
silent film
SILENT FILM!
  • Charlie Chaplin
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpjEyBKSfJQ
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bp3uGJu-kIE
  • Disney’s Oswald the Luck Rabbit
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbMW51SLFX8&list=PL124468B90E7A43EC
  • Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kjQaAK5Vof4
radio
RADIO

Although radio barely existed as a mass medium until the 1920s, it soon enjoyed tremendous growth. Networks linked many stations together, sending the same music, news, and commercials to Americans around the country.

Developed in the late 1800s, would be used for the military during World War I.

First commercial radio station is created in 1920 with KDKA in Pittsburgh.

KDKA In The Roaring Twenties

the 20 s is the jazz age
The 20’s is The Jazz Age

The Flappers

make up

cigarettes

short skirts

Writers

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Ernest Hemingway

Musicians

Louis Armstrong

Duke Ellington

the jazz age background
The Jazz AgeBackground

Music form developed in New Orleans by black musicians near the turn of the century.

A purely American creation, relied on traditional themes from southern communities and improvisation.

Would spread throughout America and be adopted by white musicians and audiences.

Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0e/Louis_Armstrong_restored.jpg/250px-Louis_Armstrong_restored.jpg

the jazz age
WRITE THIS DOWN!The Jazz Age
  • Jazz, a style of music that grew out of the African American music of the South, became highly popular during the 1920s.
    • Harlem, a district in Manhattan, New York, became a center of jazz music.
  • Flappers and others heard jazz in clubs and dance halls; the Charleston, considered by some to be a wild and reckless dance, embodied the Jazz Age.
  • The Jazz Age is a period in the 1920’s when jazz and dance became popular
  • The spread of jazz was encouraged by the introduction of large-scale radio broadcasts in 1922, which meant Americans were able to experience different styles of music without physically visiting a jazz club
slide14
The Lost

Generation

the lost generation
The Lost Generation

Gertrude Stein remarked to Ernest Hemingway that he and other American writers were all a “Lost Generation”

  • Writers who disconnected from their country and its values. Soon, this term was taken up by the flappers as well.
The Lost Generation

WRITE THIS DOWN!

the lost generation background
The Lost GenerationBackground

Nickname given to a group of American writers after World War I.

Were very critical of American society for it’s WWI values and materialism

Disillusioned by the society and politics of the 1920s.

Sinclair Lewis

WRITE THIS DOWN!

The Lost Generation Chillin’ At A Cafe

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americannovel/timeline/images/lostgeneration.jpg

the lost generation background1
The Lost GenerationBackground

Flocked to Paris or Greenwich Village, NY to live cheaply and create.

Wanted to “escape the conspiracy against the individual.”

WRITE THIS DOWN!

Entering Greenwich Village

http://ephemeralnewyork.files.wordpress.com/2008/04/washingtonarch.jpg

the lost generation f scott fitzgerald
The Lost GenerationF. Scott Fitzgerald

From Minnesota, attended Princeton, and served in World War I.

The Great Gatsby, 1925.

Most famous work of Fitzgerald, described the life a modern millionaire as being coarse, unscrupulous, and in love with another man’s wife.

Wastes his money on parties and women.

F. Scott Fitzgerald

http://10cities10years.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/f-scott-fitzgerald.jpg

the lost generation ernest hemingway the sun also rises
The Lost GenerationErnest Hemingway: The Sun Also Rises

Portrayed the world of the American expatriate.

Believed that the lives of those in the Lost Generation was one without purpose.

Hemingway Writing

http://obit-mag.com/media/image/ernest-hemingway.jpg

the lost generation ernest hemingway a farewell to arms
The Lost GenerationErnest Hemingway: A Farewell To Arms

Considered one of the greatest American novels ever.

Discussed the confusion and horrors of World War I.

Summed up in the following passage: “I was embarrassed by the words sacred, glorious, and sacrifice…We had…read them, on proclamations, now for a long time, and I had seen nothing sacred, and the things that were glorious had no glory and the sacrifices were like the stockyards in Chicago, if nothing was done with the meat except to bury it….Abstract words such as glory, honor, courage were obscene.”

Hemingway In The Spanish Civil War

http://iml.jou.ufl.edu/projects/fall01/jamieson/rifle.jpg

slide21
The Harlem

Renaissance

the harlem renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance
  • In addition to being a center of jazz, Harlem emerged as an overall cultural center for African Americans.
  • A literary awakening took place in Harlem in the 1920s that was known as the Harlem Renaissance.

WRITE THIS DOWN!

harlem renaissance
Harlem Renaissance

First major mass migration of African Americans to the North.

Wanted more equality, freedom, political participation, and opportunity.

Now settled into large, concentrated communities in cities.

Harlem Hellfighters Returning From WWI

http://www.whudat.com/news/images/harlem-hellfighters-big.jpg

harlem renaissance why harlem
Harlem RenaissanceWhy Harlem?

Largest African American city in the world, would become the cultural capital of African Americans, as well as a place for Whites to flock to experience jazz and other forms of African-American culture.

The Famous Cotton Club

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_xEehooYC6Rk/TA8kJPDzd-I/AAAAAAAACYU/jbiZjTgXYbY/s1600/cottoncb.jpg

harlem renaissance impact of ghetto life
Harlem RenaissanceImpact Of Ghetto Life

Even though life was hard, it did produce some advantages.

Enabled African-Americans to elect representatives of their own by having one solid voting block.

Stimulated self-confidence, offering economic opportunity, political rights, and freedom.

A “black world” where African-Americans could act like themselves and develop their own culture.

Harlem Ghetto In The 1920s

http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_ljfxwjAHUj1qf4u8p.jpg

what did they write about
WHAT DID THEY WRITE ABOUT?

Expressed a range of emotions from bitterness to joy and hope.

Expressing the joys and challenges of being African American, writers such as James Weldon Johnson, Zora Neale Hurston, and Langston Hughes enriched African American culture as well as American culture as a whole.

WRITE THIS DOWN!

Langston Hughes

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-1OwcuI9Xi7A/TwpH5If4qEI/AAAAAAAAESI/SqyzXsiPKOo/s1600/Langston%2BHughes.jpg

mass media and the jazz age assessment
Mass Media and the Jazz Age—Assessment

Which of these best describes how the growth of mass media affected American culture?

(A) It allowed local cultural traditions to flourish.

(B) It made learning the Charleston easier.

(C) It spread the work of Lost Generation writers.

(D) It helped create a common American popular culture.

What was the Harlem Renaissance?

(A) A style of jazz music

(B) An African American literary awakening

(C) An increase in the popularity of newspapers and magazines

(D) A type of jazz club found in Harlem

mass media and the jazz age assessment1
Mass Media and the Jazz Age—Assessment

Which of these best describes how the growth of mass media affected American culture?

(A) It allowed local cultural traditions to flourish.

(B) It made learning the Charleston easier.

(C) It spread the work of Lost Generation writers.

(D) It helped create a common American popular culture.

What was the Harlem Renaissance?

(A) A style of jazz music

(B) An African American literary awakening

(C) An increase in the popularity of newspapers and magazines

(D) A type of jazz club found in Harlem

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