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One need not be a Chamber — to be Haunted — PowerPoint Presentation
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One need not be a Chamber — to be Haunted —

One need not be a Chamber — to be Haunted —

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One need not be a Chamber — to be Haunted —

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  1. Emily Dickinson spends half term at the Brit Awards. I bet I look miserable on the dancefloor. One need not be a Chamber — to be Haunted — 25th February 2014

  2. One need not be a Chamber — to be Haunted — One need not be a House — The Brain has Corridors — surpassing Material Place — Far safer, of a Midnight Meeting External Ghost Than its interior Confronting — That Cooler Host. Far safer, through an Abbey gallop, The Stones a’chase — Than Unarmed, one’s a’self encounter — In lonesome Place — Ourself behind ourself, concealed — Should startle most — Assassin hid in our Apartment Be Horror’s least. The Body — borrows a Revolver — He bolts the Door — O’erlooking a superior spectre — Or More —

  3. Consider these versions… • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kf9jo1dvEsg • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MlvEJ3SWTgs

  4. Suggested different meanings to ‘Haunted’. ‘One’ here suggests a person, starting a comparison between a physical space and a mental space. One need not be a Chamber — to be Haunted — One need not be a House — The Brain has Corridors — surpassing Material Place — Again, Dickinson starts to show her mental turmoil – her mind is a confusing place. The brain is a far more confusing place than a house meaning there is far more scope for ‘haunting’. Think about the rhyme scheme as well – the second and fourth line are meant to rhyme but it is only partial perhaps suggesting her turmoil.

  5. She is suggesting that meeting a ‘real’ ghost is ‘safer’ than confronting the monsters inside one’s mind. Note how she uses alliteration to develop her effect although her sentences are more muddled. Far safer, of a Midnight Meeting External Ghost Than its interior Confronting — That Cooler Host. This ‘interior Confronting’ suggests there is a certain amount of aggression/fear in the meeting. The rhyme here is far more regular than in verse one. Can we find a reason for this?

  6. Dickinson uses the traditional ideas from gothic horror – ‘a horseman riding through the night’ and ideas of the mind. Note the repetition here – this stresses the contrast between the ‘safety’ of traditional gothic horror and the horror of the mind. Far safer, through an Abbey gallop, The Stones a’chase — Than Unarmed, one’s a’self encounter — In lonesome Place — It is ourselves we are most afraid of and our minds are a scary ‘lonesome’ place. Note how she stresses the fear of being ‘unarmed’ – in our minds we have no defence.

  7. This suggests that when we meet ourselves it will make us jump – do we then avoid confronting our own persona? We should be most afraid of finding ourselves hidden away. Ourself behind ourself, concealed — Should startle most — Assassin hid in our Apartment Be Horror’s least. In fact, Dickinson almost suggests that this idea is trivial compared to the monsters of the mind. Again, this is a convention of horror – but a killer need not be the source of our fear.

  8. There is a sense that these physical barriers are trivial, they can easily be overcome. In the physical world – symbolised by ‘the body’ – it is looking to protect itself using traditional weapons. The Body — borrows a Revolver — He bolts the Door — O’erlooking a superior spectre — Or More — We ignore the greater fear that is inside us – again she uses alliteration. Although the rhyme here is perfect, the fact that we have a short, truncated line leaves us fearful – what else is there?

  9. Summary • Although Dickinson is suggesting a mind in turmoil (possible mental illness?) by comparing internal conflict with gothic horror conventions she makes it far less disturbing than “It was not death…”, for example. • Do we find the poem creepy? • What impression do we get from the last line? • Think about the form of the poem – does the rhyme scheme add to our understanding.

  10. THEME How can you link this poem to others? Things to consider: Mental confusion Poetic form