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  1. What you need for class today • PCR book • Homework assignment pad • Pen or pencil • Yellow response journal • Reading Workshop folder • 2012/2013 Reading Record (white paper) Does someone have the class journal?

  2. READING WORKSHOP #17 January 14, 2013 Mini-Lesson on Genres (Part Two)

  3. Important Dates • January 15 to 18 • Sentence patterns • Action v. Linking Verbs • Reading Minutes (continue) • January 23 • School wide Spelling Bee • Final Review for grammar Post Test II/2 • January 24 • Grammar Post Test II/2 • January 25 • Last day for Reading Minutes • Next Reading Workshop #17 • Return of Summative Writing Assessment

  4. What to do before the mini-lesson: Update your weekly reading record (yellow paper in Reading Workshop folder). --Under the comment section, describe what you have accomplished as a reader since January 8, six days ago. Be sure to include if you presented a Reading Minute --Today’s mini-lesson is “Genres—Part Two”.

  5. PERIOD 3: Yellow response journal January 9, 2013—Class response to Cardturner You need to compose a paragraph that explains the genre of your current PCR book. This response can be composed in your journal today or can be word-processed and completed at home for tomorrow (01/15/2013).

  6. PERIOD 4: Yellow response journal January 8, 2013—Composed genre ¶ on your own PCR book. January 11, 2013—composed genre response on one of 3 Reading Minute novels. You should revise the January 8 response if you scored a “2” or a “3”. Do so on a separate piece of paper. You can revise the January 13 response if you scored a “1”. Do so in your journal.

  7. PERIODS 5 and 6: Genre ¶ due January 11, 2013. January 14, 2013: Yellow response journal activity on identifying the genres. • Review the characteristics of several common and popular genres. • Mr. Beyer will give a book talk on 3 texts. • Listen carefully and jot a few notes on the books. • Compose a 3 or 4 sentence paragraph that identifies the genre of these books.

  8. PERIOD 7: Yellow response journal January 14, 2013—TYPE 2 You need to compose a paragraph that explains the genre of your current PCR book. This response can be composed in your journal today or can be word-processed and completed at home for tomorrow (01/15/2013).

  9. PERIOD 7: Genre ¶ written on January X January 14, 2013: Yellow response journal activity on identifying the genres. • Review the characteristics of several common and popular genres. • Mr. Beyer will give a book talk on 3 texts. • Listen carefully and jot a few notes on the books. • Compose a 3 or 4 sentence paragraph that identifies the genre of these books.

  10. Read aloud this slide and record 2 pieces of information in your journal. What is a “genre?” There are many kinds of art —music, painting, sculpture, and literature are a few examples of an art . A genre is a particular kind of art according to the criteria of that form. In literature, genres are vague categories with no fixed boundaries. Genres are formed by sets of common characteristics. Genre is originally a French word meaning "kind", "sort" or "type“.

  11. Create this chart in your journal.

  12. The next 2 slides offer a list of genres for prose works of fiction and nonfiction. As you read today, consider what is the genre of your PCR text. NOTE: “Realistic fiction” does not appear on this list. It’s a genre sometimes used by librarians but not one used by students of literature.

  13. Genres of novels Review this slide before writing the TICKET OUT.

  14. Genres of nonfiction Review this slide before writing the TICKET OUT.

  15. TICKET IN: What is the genre of your PCR text? Using the next slide, give and explain with examples two reasons to support your choice of a genre for the book you are reading. Write this TICKET OUT in your yellow response journal.

  16. Genre features, aspects, or characteristics—use the correct terms!! FICTION NONFICTION Audience Purpose Subjects Time period and location/setting Key events/conflicts Messages, lessons, emotions Narration or narrative style Text structure features (TSF) • Audience • Purpose • Characters • Plot/conflicts • Setting • Theme or message • Narration or narrative style

  17. Identify the five common purposes in writing. TO INSPIRE—emotions/feelings “to breathe into” TO PERSUADE--opinions TO DESCRIBE—images that appeal to the senses TO INSTRUCT OR INFORM--facts TO ENTERTAIN—what pleases an audience

  18. Some useful definitions • Adventure novels often involve survival or a conflict with nature. • Thrillers are stories filled with suspense. • Historical novels are set in a historical time period and may have real people as characters. • A mystery often has a detective or a crime that needs to be solved.

  19. Some more useful definitions • Romances come in two types: (1) a story about the deeds of a hero (2) a love story • A fantasy involves a make-believe world, heroes and heroines, and fanciful creatures. • Science fiction stretches the boundaries of reality or genuine science.

  20. Useful definitions (con.) • A Bildungsroman is a “coming of age” novel. In it the protagonist matures usually by leaving behind his or her innocence. • Adolescent or teen fiction is written for and about teenagers. • Contemporary literature are works by modern writers that may well become classics. • Literary classics are great writing that have stood the test of time.

  21. Other useful definitions • Sports fiction involves athletics in its plot and its setting. Often the protagonist is an athlete or an aspiring athlete. • Horror stories involve ghosts and the supernatural. • Folktales, myths, and legends are the stories of fantasy that reflect a people’s culture, history, or religion.

  22. A final page of useful definitions • Allegories are stories in which the characters serve as symbols. (Animal Farm, The Life of Pi) • A comedy is written to make its readers laugh. • A satire is both funny and instructive; at times, a satire’s humor can seem blunt or even cruel.

  23. Reading Workshop #18—What is a classic? January 13th’s lesson ends here.

  24. 1. ______ can be divided into ______ large categories. A. nonfiction—three B. prose—two C. poetry—many D. fiction--five 2. Prose is the “ordinary” form of communication. Another meaning for the adjective “ordinary” is _____. • entertaining B. irregular C. daily D. organized 3. Nonfiction and fiction are the two large categories or _____ of prose . • audiences B. purposes C. subjects D. genres 4. ______ is an obvious “non-example” of _______. A. poetry—prose B. paragraphs—prose C. prose—fiction and nonfiction D. poetry—verse

  25. 1. ______ can be divided into ______ large categories. A. nonfiction—three B. prose—two C. poetry—many D. fiction--five 2. Prose is the “ordinary” form of communication. Another meaning for the adjective “ordinary” is _____. • entertaining B. irregular C. daily D. organized 3. Nonfiction and fiction are the two large categories or _____ of prose . • audiences B. purposes C. subjects D. genres 4. ______ is an obvious “non-example” of _______. A. poetry—prose B. paragraphs—prose C. prose—fiction and nonfiction D. poetry—verse

  26. Fiction? Nonfiction? Prose? Poetry? Here are somefamiliar genres we’veencounteredthisyear in PCR reading or thatwe’vediscussedthisyear. Some, not all, are defined in Prentice-Hall on pages R5 to R11.

  27. Make this chart in your yellow response journal under the date January 14, 2013. Group members: ____________________________________ LAPD: ____

  28. T o be filled out by group. Multiple participants required. Remember to write all titles correctly. Group members: ____________________________________ LAPD: ____

  29. Read aloud this slide and record 2 pieces of information in your journal. What is a “genre?” • Genres are often divided into sub-genres. In literature, for instance, can be organized according to the "poetic genres" and the "prose genres". • Poetry might be subdivided into epic, lyric, and dramatic, while prose might be subdivided into fiction and non-fiction. Further subdivisions of dramatic poetry, for instance, might include comedy, tragedy, melodrama, and so forth. • This dividing into subgenres can continue: "comedy" has its own genres, for example, including farce, comedy of manners, burlesque, and satire.