HCI + UI = UX - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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HCI + UI = UX

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  1. HCI + UI = UX CS 4730 – Computer Game Design

  2. How do we interact with the game? • Broken into two parts • 1. a device that can sense a player’s physical motion (we’re assuming we’re not using mental devices just yet…) • 2. how the game interprets the movement into the virtual world • Part 2 is related to mechanics/dynamics • Part 1 can be decoupled from games a bit and discussed independently 2

  3. Categories of Devices • Touch-based • Inertial-based • Sound-based • Camera-based • “Advanced sensing” • Each of these has subcategories as well 3

  4. Touch-Based • This category involves all devices that require physical contact to sense user input • By far the largest/most common category • Most are all electric circuit based, wherein a player completes a circuit by a motion, thus triggering a signal to the system 4

  5. Touch-Based • Binary Circuits • Button unpressed = low voltage • Button pressed = high voltage • Angular Sensors (potentiometer) • Analog joysticks vary the voltage with position • Electromagnetic Field • Surface with baseline electromagnetic state is disrupted by a finger touch • Resistive completes a circuit beneath 5

  6. Controller Examples • Keyboard • Mouse • Console Controller • Specialized Console Controller 6

  7. WASD and the Mouse • The keyboard has been around for a LONG time (relatively speaking) • Devised in the early 1900s • With computing devices in the 60’s • The mouse… not as long, but still for a while • 1984 • Xerox PARC and Apple and Microsoft 7

  8. WASD and the Mouse • What sort of games make sense for this control structure? • Why? • How does that affect the game play? 8

  9. Evolution of the Console Controller 9

  10. Inertial-Based • Accelerometer • Senses the direction of acceleration and gravitational force on a single axis • Magnetometer • Effectively a compass sensing the Earth’s magnetic field • Gyroscope • Senses angular velocity and change in force on a spinning mass 10

  11. Accelerometers and the Wiimote • Wiimote uses a 3-axis combo accelerometer • Wii Motion Plus adds a gyroscope • Demo 11

  12. Accelerometers and the iPhone • How is this a different dynamic? 12

  13. GPS as Input Device • Seek ‘n Spell 13

  14. Handling Noisy Input • Uncertain input can make games frustrating • Player intention has to match game interpretation • This breaks down into a state estimation problem • By increasing or decreasing sampling rate, we can have a better prediction as to what state the device is in 14

  15. Light Guns • Flashing on the screen is interpreted by the device • A ray can be traced from the gun aperture to the screen to determine the angle of attack 15

  16. Sound-Based • Speech Commands • Calculate the Euclidian distance from a normalized sound clip to training clips stored in a database • Additional training models can be layered on top of this • Or you could ignore all of that and just go for pitch (i.e. Rock Band) 16

  17. Camera-Based • Blobfinding– latching on to specific colored things in the environment • Background subtraction – over n frames, what hasn’t changed? That’s the background • And… let’s just look at the Kinect and Child of Eden 17

  18. Input Schemes • Step 1: Which controller • Step 2: What buttons do what? • Step 3: ???? • Step 4: Profit! 18

  19. Input Schemes • How do you know what button does what? 19

  20. Input Schemes • The bane of several genres • Sports • FPSs • The bane of touch screen games • Virtual sticks • Touch-to-move • The bane of keyboard games • … that’s a lot of buttons… 20

  21. “Accepted” Input Schemes • How are these communicated to users? • How do we get over the problem of “training” new gamers? 21

  22. Okay… so that’s control • Now how do we relay info back to the user on screen • The User Interface is essential to the feedback construct of games 22

  23. Let’s Take This Out of Video • How do you consider user interface for non-digital games? • What provides feedback? • How is it enforced? 23

  24. How “Easy” is “Easy”? • Ease-of-use vs. Ease-of-learning • Ease-of-use • If you already know what you want to do, how quick / easy is it to pull it off? • Ease-of-learning • If you are new to a game, how easy is it to figure out what you are allowed to do and how to do it? • Usually, there is a linear trade off between these two concepts 24

  25. How “Easy” is “Easy”? • Consider any WASD game • Tons of hot keys • … tons of keys period • Very quick to do many different actions • How do you know which button to press? 25

  26. How “Easy” is “Easy”? • Consider a complex board game • Usually, there are tons of charts, symbols, icons, etc. • Very easy for an experienced player to know exactly what’s going on • Intimidating to novice players 26

  27. How “Easy” is “Easy”? • Sometimes you can do both • The concept here is called recognition over recall 27

  28. Super Models • The User Model • How the user “thinks” the system will behave • The Program Model • How the game ACTUALLY will behave • Program Model is always “right” with video games • This isn’t always true with board games! 28

  29. Super Models • You want these models to match as much as possible • Even if there is some “behind the scenes” shenanigans going on to make it look right • Which is easier to change? • How do you know if you need to change something? 29

  30. Super Models • Play testing! • This is actually much more robust than in other software development • You watch people play • See what buttons they press • When they press • How they press • How they interact • Watch lots of people! 30

  31. If the Models are Wrong • Frustration, embarrassment, anger are all reactions to an incorrect user model • Probably not a central aesthetic to your game • (maybe…) 31

  32. Focus on the Interactions! • What is the operational profile of your game? • Find the most common activities and make them the easiest to do • Find the most common icons/symbols and put them up-front and center • Don’t rely on traditional colors/symbols for everything • Consider the mailbox icon… 32

  33. Tips and Tricks • Eliminate all uninteresting tasks – everything should have a purpose • Use visual metaphors – make it obvious for what something represents • Be consistent with similar/established games • Keep HUDs appropriate to the asethetics 33

  34. How important is UI design? • If you screw up your UI for a text editor • The user might get a little frustrated • Might read the manual • Might realize they are using EMACS and quit • If you screw up your UI for a game • The user gets very frustrated • The user may get angry • The user will never buy your game again • The user will leave lots of nasty comments 34

  35. What are you trying to convey? • What are you trying to get across to the user with your UI design? 35

  36. What are you trying to convey? • The state of the world • The rules • The available actions/interactions • How do you do this? • How do you show the state while keeping gamers immersed? 36

  37. Providing Info 37

  38. Providing Info 38

  39. Providing Info 39

  40. Examples 40

  41. Examples 41

  42. Examples 42

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  44. Examples 44

  45. Examples 45

  46. Examples 46