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Dispersal of bark beetles and predators. Arnaud Costa and Dr John Reeve Insect Ecology Department of Zoology Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. Main objective: measure dispersal of three Coleoptera associated to red pine stands decline. Predator: Thanasimus dubius (Cleridae).

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Dispersal of bark beetles and predators


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    1. Dispersal of bark beetles and predators Arnaud Costa and Dr John Reeve Insect Ecology Department of Zoology Southern Illinois University, Carbondale

    2. Main objective: measure dispersal of three Coleoptera associated to red pine stands decline Predator: Thanasimus dubius (Cleridae) 1- Introduction: predators and bark beetles in the red pine system Root colonizer: Dendroctonus valens (Scolytidae) Bark beetle prey / Stem colonizer: Ips pini (Scolytidae)

    3. 1- Introduction: predators and bark beetles in the red pine system Question: How far do these insects fly? - interactions could be approached by measuring dispersal of each guild member - predators limit the expansion of declining stands by reducing Ips numbers • measuring beetles' dispersal evaluate connectedness among stands

    4. 2 - Methods - traps set at 50,100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 750, 1000, 1250, 1500, 1750 and 2000 m. Mark recapture grid

    5. 2 - Methods Semiochemicals / lures

    6. 2 - Methods Mark recapture - T. dubius and D. valens caught are marked with a spot of paint on the pronotum - I. pini will be marked with fluorescent powder while emerging from infested logs - insects will be released at the center of a grid of traps

    7. 3 - Field sites Mirror Lake Spring Green Kettle Moraine

    8. 3 - Field sites Black rivers Falls ? (2006) Mirror Lake (2007) Spring Green Kettle Moraine (2006)

    9. 4 - Field sites Black rivers Falls (2006)

    10. 4 – Expected schedule • Field sites hunting July 2005 - March 2006 (“done”) - Kettle Morainemid March (done) • Set grids of traps - Black rivers falls ?early April • Baiting traps early- mid April • Cut logs / Ips pini late April • 1st Capture/release (T. dubius / D. valens) mid May • 2nd Capture/release (T. dubius / D. valens)mid June • 1st Capture/release (Ips pini) mid June

    11. T. dubius Recapture 33 % caught > 2 km 2000 m (Cronin et al., 2000) 66 %

    12. Acknowledgements Dr Kenneth Raffa, Dr John Reeve Bob Murphy Shane Lishawa Sally Dahir Jane Cummings Carlson Todd Lanigan Special thanks to DNR, Wisconsin: Land managers Mike Sieger (Kettle Moraine) Paul Zajackowski (Mirror Lake) NSF for funding Also thanks to : Renée, Kyoko, Joe