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BALLADS
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  1. BALLADS Medieval & Modern

  2. BALLAD HISTORY • HISTORY • Late Medieval Europe (1200-1400s). • Began as a type of folk song that told an exciting story.  • Francis James Child, wrote the book The English and Scottish Ballads, which was a compilation of the ballads of the time.  • Robin Hood was a ballad

  3. BALLAD 5 CHARACTERISTICS 1) A ballad… • tells a simple, dramaticstory, typically in third person narrative. • Usually begins at a catastrophe • ballads tell of love, death, the supernatural, or a combination of these

  4. BALLAD 5 CHARACTERISTICS 2) A ballad… • focuses on actions and dialogue of a single crucial episode or situationrather than characteristics and narration. • Little attention to the setting and character descriptions • Plain language

  5. BALLAD 5 CHARACTERISTICS 3) A ballad… • A ballad has a simple metrical structure and sentence structure. That means the lines have roughly the same amount of syllables I went to the market today 1 2 3 4 5-6 7-8

  6. BALLAD 5 CHARACTERISTICS 4) A ballad… • is sung to a modal melody. (rhythmical pattern) • Heavy amount of repetition, refrains and parallelism, which may be a way of discharging emotion, or to serve as a mnemonic technique.

  7. BALLAD 5 CHARACTERISTICS 5) A ballad… • is of the oral tradition, passed down by word of mouth. Therefore, it undergoes changes and is of anonymous authorship. • Originally circulated among “illiterate” or “semi-literate” groups

  8. BALLAD 5 CHARACTERISTICS Sample Stanza: The wind cauld blew south and north, And blew into the floor; Quoth our goodman to our goodwife, “Get out and bar the door.” DETAILS, DETAILS Rhyme: Traditionally, the second and fourth lines rhyme in each quatrain Structure: Varied, but most often a series of quatrains and incremental repetition. Measure/Beat: Typically iambic tetrameter and iambic pentameter on alternating lines Common Themes: Love, tragedy, religion, politics, triumph, loss

  9. BALLAD SPECIAL TERMINOLOGY Direct Address – construction in which the speaker directly addresses another person (who is usually in the poem as well) Example from “Lord Randall”: "Oh where ha'e ye been, Lord Randall my son? O where ha'e ye been, my handsome young man?" "I ha'e been to the wild wood: mother, make my bed soon, For I’m weary wi' hunting, and fain wald lie down."

  10. MEDIEVAL LANGUAGE • DON’T RECOGNIZE A WORD? • Look at the bottom under definitions OR • Say the word out loud to yourself take an educated guess as to what the words/phrases mean. Often it is just spelled differently. • Ex. “do ye take auf the old man’s beard?” • WORDS WITH APOSTROPHES • Apostrophes mean letters are missing! • “the first word whae’ershou’dspeak”

  11. ~GET UP & BAR THE DOOR~ ANONYMOUS • 1 It fell about the Martinmas time,And a gay time it was then,When our goodwife got puddings to make,And she ’s boil’d them in the pan. • 5 The wind cauld blew south and north,And blew into the floor;Quoth our goodman to our goodwife,“Get out and bar the door.” • “My hand is in my hussyfskap,10 Goodman, as ye may see;An’ it shou’dna be barr’d this hundred year,It ’s no be barr’d for me.” • They made a paction ’tween them two,They made it firm and sure,15 That the first word whae’ershou’d speak,Shou’d rise and bar the door. • Then by there came two gentlemen,At twelve o’ clock at night,And they could neither see house nor hall,20 Nor coal nor candle-light. • “Now whether is this a rich man’s house,Or whether is it a poor?”But ne’er a word would any o’ them speak,For barring of the door. • 25 And first they ate the white puddings,And then they ate the black. Tho’ muckle thought the goodwife to hersel’ Yet ne’er a word she spake. • Then said the one unto the other,30 “Here, man, take ye my knife;Do ye take auf the old man’s beard,And I’ll kiss the goodwife.” • “But there’s no water in the house,And what shall we do than?”35 “What ails ye at the pudding-broo,That boils into the pan?” • O up then started our goodman,An angry man was he:“Will ye kiss my wife before my eyes,40 And scald me wi’ pudding-bree?” • Then up and started our goodwife,Goed three skips on the floor:“Goodman, you’ve spoken the foremost word!Get up and bar the door.”

  12. ~GET UP & BAR THE DOOR~ ANONYMOUS • 1 It fell about the Martinmas time,And a gay time it was then,When our goodwife got puddings to make,And she ’s boil’d them in the pan. • 5 The wind cauld blew south and north,And blew into the floor;Quoth our goodman to our goodwife,“Get out and bar the door.” • “My hand is in my hussyfskap,10 Goodman, as ye may see;An’ it shou’dna be barr’d this hundred year,It ’s no be barr’d for me.” • They made a paction ’tween them two,They made it firm and sure,15 That the first word whae’ershou’d speak,Shou’d rise and bar the door. • Then by there came two gentlemen,At twelve o’ clock at night,And they could neither see house nor hall,20 Nor coal nor candle-light. • “Now whether is this a rich man’s house,Or whether is it a poor?”But ne’er a word would any o’ them speak,For barring of the door. • 25 And first they ate the white puddings,And then they ate the black. Tho’ muckle thought the goodwife to hersel’ Yet ne’er a word she spake. • Then said the one unto the other,30 “Here, man, take ye my knife;Do ye take off the old man’s beard,And I’ll kiss the goodwife.” • “But there’s no water in the house,And what shall we do than?”35 “What ails ye at the pudding-broo,That boils into the pan?” • O up then started our goodman,An angry man was he:“Will ye kiss my wife before my eyes,40 And scald me wi’ pudding-bree?” • Then up and started our goodwife,Goed three skips on the floor:“Goodman, you’ve spoken the foremost word!Get up and bar the door.” IS IT A BALLAD? 1) Quatrains (4 line stanzas) 2) Lines 2 & 4 rhyme (in blue) 3) Tells a story & uses direct address

  13. ~GET UP & BAR THE DOOR~ ANONYMOUS COMPREHENSION: • What does the goodman want the goodwife to do and why? What is the goodwife’s reply to this request? • How do they resolve their problem? INTERPRETATION/ANALYSIS: • What does the stranger mean when he suggest taking “aff the auld man’s beard?” • What serious point does this humorous ballad make? • What words best describe the goodwife and the goodman in the poem? DEBATEALBE THOUGHTS: • Who is more foolish – the husband or the wife? • Can people be hurt by stubbornness (their own or someone else’s)? Give an example. • Can we relate this poem to couples today?

  14. TWA CORBIES (Two Ravens) As I was walking all alane, I heard twacorbies making a mane. The one unto the tither did say, “Wharsall we go and dine the day?” “In behint that auld fail dlyke, I wont there lies a new-slain knight; And naebody knows that he lies there But his hawk, his hound and his lady fair.” “His hound is to the hunting gane, His hawk to fetch the wild-fowl hame, His lady’s ta’enanither mate, So we may make our dinner sweet. “Ye’ll sit on his white hause-bane, And I’ll pike out his bonny blue e’en; Wi’ a lock o’ his golden hair We’ll thatch our nest when it grows bare. “Many a one for him makes mane, But none sall care whar he is gane. O’er his white banes, when they are bare, The wind sall blow for evermair.”

  15. MOODLE ASSIGNMENTS • PRACTICE ASSIGNMENTS DUE TONIGHT - Practice assignments (poem analysis & poetry in music discussion) NEW ASSIGNMENT - due M 10/29 Ballad analysis assignment on “Barbara Allen” (multiple choice & short answer) OPEN-ENDED FORMAT: Answer - Proof - Enhance

  16. BALLAD REVIEW MEDIEVAL TIME PERIOD (1200-1400s) • Anonymously passed down through oral tradition until James Child who wrote them down CHARACTERISTICS • Simple, dramatic narrative • Focus on event/dialogue (direct address w/in the poem)… NOT characters or setting • Simple meter and sentence structure • Quatrains w/ incremental rhymes (lines 2 & 4 traditionally) • Meant to be sung - modal melody (repetitive with mneumonic devices) “Get Out & Bar the Door” “Twa Corbies” “We Real Cool”

  17. "Oh where ha'e ye been, Lord Randall my son? O where ha'e ye been, my handsome young man?" "I ha'e been to the wild wood: mother, make my bed soon, For I’m weary wi' hunting, and fain wald lie down." "Where gat ye your dinner, Lord Randall my son? Where gat ye your dinner, my handsome young man?" "I dined wi' my true love; mother, make my bed soon, For I'm weary wi' hunting, and fain wald lie down." "What gat ye to your dinner, Lord Randall my son? What gat ye to your dinner, my handsome young man?" "I gat eels boiled in broo: mother, make my bed soon, For I'm weary wi' hunting, and fain wald lie down." "What became of your bloodhounds, Lord Randall my son? What became of your bloodhounds, my handsome young man?" "O they swelled and they died: mother, make my bed soon, for I'm weary wi' hunting, and fain wald lie down." "O I fear ye are poisoned, Lord Randall my son! O I fear ye are poisoned, my handsome young man!" "O yes, I am poisoned: mother, make my bed soon, For I'm sick at the heart, and I fain wald lie down." ANALYSIS Summary Ballad characteristics Direct Address Theme - opinionated statement about the topic Tone - author’s feeling Character Descriptions (mom & son) LORD RANDALL

  18. The king sits in Dumferling town, Drinking the blood-red wine; “O where will I get a good sailor, To sail this ship of mine?” Up and spoke an ancient knight, Sat at the king’s right knee: “Sir Patrick Spens is the best sailor, That sails upon the sea.” The king has written a broad letter, And signed it with his hand, And sent it to Sir Patrick Spens, Who was walking on the sand. The first line that Sir Patrick read, A loud laugh laughed he; The next line Sir Patrick read, The tear blinded his e’ (eye). “O who is this has done this deed, This ill deed done to me, To send me out this time of year, To sail upon the sea!” “Make haste, make haste, my merry men all, Our good ship sails the morn.” “O say not so, my master dear, For I fear a deadly storm. “Late, late yesterday evening I saw the new moon With the old moon in her arm, And I fear, I fear my dear master, That we will come to harm.” O our Scot nobles were right loath To wet their cork-heeled shoes, But long before the play were played, Their hats they swam above. O long, long may their ladies sit, With their fans into their hand, Or every they see Sir Patrick Spens Come sailing to the land. O long, long may their ladies sit, With their gold combs in their hair, Waiting for their own dear lords, For they’ll see then no more. SIR PATRICK SPENS

  19. NERLAN NOEL – KENTUCKY BBALL PLAYER WHO DOES THIS LOOK LIKE?

  20. BALLAD REVIEW MEDIEVAL TIME PERIOD (1200-1400s) • Anonymously passed down through oral tradition until James Child who wrote them down CHARACTERISTICS • Simple, dramatic narrative • Focus on event/dialogue (direct address w/in the poem)… NOT characters or setting • Simple meter and sentence structure • Quatrains w/ incremental rhymes (lines 2 & 4 traditionally) • Meant to be sung - modal melody (repetitive with mneumonic devices) “Get Out & Bar the Door” “Twa Corbies” “We Real Cool”

  21. MODERN BALLADS (Simple, dramatic stories; direct address often used; repetition used, but not necessarily in quatrains)

  22. MODERN BALLADS (Simple, dramatic stories; direct address often used; repetition used, but not necessarily in quatrains) 1) The Show Must Go On - Queen 2) Faithfully - Journey 3) Hurricane – Bob Dylan 4) Stairway to Heaven – Led Zeppelin 5) Wanted Dead or Alive – Bon Jovi 6) Turn the Page – Bob Sager 7) American Pie – Don McClean 8) Every Breath You Take – The Police 9) Behind Blue Eyes – The Who 10) Piano Man – Billy Joel 11) November Rain – Guns N Roses 12)Desperado – The Eagles 13) Tears in Heaven – Eric Clapton 14) Candle in the Wind – Elton John 15) My Immortal – Evanescence 16) Picture to Burn – Taylor Swift 17) Dear Mama – Tupac 18) Ballad of a Fallen Soldier – Jay-Z 19) Sing for the Moment – Eminem 20) Fast Cars and Freedom – Rascal Flatts 21) Good Stuff – Kenney Chesney 22) One – Metallica 23)Sleep now in the Fire - Rage Against the Machine 24) November Rain - Guns & Roses 25) War Pigs – Black Sabbath

  23. BATTLE OF THE SEXES • ON YOUR OWN, answer AT LEAST 4 of the following questions in a school appropriate and realistic fashion. • What are the most important characteristics in a BF/GF? • What would be an ideal, romantic date? • What do you consider a good 1 year anniversary gift? • What is the best way to ask someone out? • What is the worst way to break up with someone? • What are your feelings on nicknames? • Are there any things you shouldn’t say or comment on to a BF/GF? *BF/GF = boyfriend/girlfriend

  24. “I love you sweatheart” – Thomas lux • She will know I love her now,the world will know my love for her!A man risked his life to write the world.Love is like this at the bone, we hope, loveis like this, Sweatheart, all sore and dumband dangerous, ignited, blessed--always,regardless, no exceptions,always in blazing matters like these: blessed. • A man risked his life to write the words.A man hung upside down (an idiot friendholding his legs?) with spray paintto write the words on a girder fifty feet abovea highway. And his beloved, • the next morning driving to work...?His words are not (meant to be) so unique.Does she recognize his handwriting?Did he hint to her at her doorstep the night beforeof "something special, darling, tomorrow"?And did he call her at workexpecting her to faint with delightat his celebration of her, his passion, his risk?

  25. HECTOR IN HADES • Greek Mythology: • Hector was the eldest son of Priam, King of Troy. • Achilles was a Greek warrior who killed Hector in a one on one battle during the Trojan War. After killing Hector, Achilles drug Hector’s body around the Trojan Wall for 12 days. • Hades is the underworld (Ancient Greek version of Hell).

  26. Yes, this is where I stood that day, Beside this sunny mound. The walls of Troy are far away, And outward comes no sound. I wait. On all the empty plain A burnished stillness lies, Save for the chariot's tinkling hum, And a few distant cries. His helmet glitters near. The world Slowly turns around, With some new sleight compels my feet From the fighting ground. I run. If I turn back again The earth must turn with me, The mountains planted on the plain, The sky clamped to the sea. The grasses puff a little dust Where my footsteps fall. I cast a shadow as I pass The little wayside wall. The strip of grass on either hand Sparkles in the light; I only see that little space To the left and to the right, And in that space our shadows run, His shadow there and mine, The little flowers, the tiny mounds, The grasses frail and fine. But narrower still and narrower! My course is shrunk and small, Yet vast as in a deadly dream, And faint the Trojan wall. The sun up in the towering sky Turns like a spinning ball. The sky with all its clustered eyes Grows still with watching me, The flowers, the mounds, the flaunting weeds Wheel slowly round to see. Two shadows racing on the grass, Silent and so near, Until his shadow falls on mine. And I am rid of fear. The race is ended. Far away I hang and do not care, While round bright Troy Achilles whirls A corpse with streaming hair.