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  1. Managing an Overseas Campus – the view from Nottingham Dick Chamberlain Dick.Chamberlain@nottingham.ac.uk ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus

  2. General: • Why do we have overseas campuses • What does the University want them to achieve • How does that affect the way we plan their library services • Specific: • Acquisitions: • What’s the same and what’s different for the two campuses • What are the challenges ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus

  3. China and Malaysia • Semenyih (near Kuala Lumpur) is 2,250 miles from Ningbo (near Shanghai) • Both are about 7,000 miles from Nottingham ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus

  4. Malaysia ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus

  5. China ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus

  6. Strategic reasons for having overseas campuses Strengthening the brand Attracting students: “A UK education but not with a UK price-tag” Offer them international experience (valuable in job-market) Increasing research potential: New partnerships New sources of research income ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus

  7. Measures of success Malaysia: Tier 5 (Excellent) SETARA Rated, July 2010 Student numbers: 3820 (including 1451 from outside Malaysia) in 2010-11 ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus

  8. Measures of success China: Invitation (Autumn 2010) to open a second China campus, in Shanghai Student numbers: 4,800 (9% PG, 91% UG) – expect to rise to 8,000 within 5 years 100% of graduates employed or in further study Research: First PhD students in 2009 Strong interests in sustainable energy and manufacturing ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus

  9. A single University academically: Branch campuses, not franchises Only programmes fully approved in Nottingham are delivered in Malaysia and China Courses are owned by Schools in Nottingham All quality assurance is through Nottingham All degrees awarded are University of Nottingham degrees ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus

  10. The “Nottingham experience”: All campuses should provide the same level of facilities The same: Standards Systems Management methods Language - in all campuses Underpin academic integrity Facilitate mobility. ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus

  11. ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus

  12. The “Nottingham experience” for library services Similar opening hours Similar levels of user instruction and support - using the same learning materials for information skills Self-service borrowing and return Consistent cataloguing standards and practices Equivalent printed and electronic library resources - delivered using the same LMS and discovery/access tools ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus

  13. ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus

  14. Parity in provision of library resources E-resources Predominantly licences originally agreed for Nottingham Most allow access for China and Malaysia (or specially negotiated to allow it) Neither campus belongs to a local purchasing consortium 13 of top 17 e-resource deals by value all allow use by Malaysia and China 2 of these 13 require additional payment above the terms for Nottingham ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus

  15. E-resources – differences Malaysia: Distance-learners and part-timers: reliance on access to e-resources Relatively little space for print collections Has its own deals for e-book access, providing about 750 titles so far China: Network performance no problem Internet access - some restrictions (YouTube, Facebook, Twitter blocked) ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus

  16. Print resources – Malaysia: Books: Initial large stock purchase – now buys c. 3,000 books per year Most books bought within Malaysia, using 3 local supply agents Print expected to decline Journals: Very few subs Local subscription agent ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus

  17. Print resources – China: Regulations! Import agents Books-per-student norms: 4 new books per student per year Total size of library stock: 50 books per UG, 75 per PGT, 100 per PGR Journal subs: 173. Import agent acts as subscription agent ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus

  18. Conclusion: challenges Cultural differences - Quanxi; government regulations Tension between generic and local Penalties of success and growth ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus

  19. Acknowledgements: Content: Khan Quay Kin - Head of Information Services, UNMC May Yan - Deputy Director(Library Services), UNNC Chris Middleton - Head of Academic Services, Information Services (UNUK). Slides borrowed from: Christine Ennew (Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Internationalisation) Ian Pashby (Provost) UNMC Nick Miles (Provost) UNNC ASA Annual Conference 2011 Managing an Overseas Campus