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Tending the Garden in Non-Classroom Settings. Mark Tateosian Anoka-Hennepin Schools November 18, 2013 Metro SW-PBIS Winter Training. Outcomes. Be able to articulate the main features of PBIS and how “managing non-classroom settings” fits in.

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Tending the Garden in Non-Classroom Settings


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    1. Tending the Garden in Non-Classroom Settings Mark Tateosian Anoka-Hennepin Schools November 18, 2013 Metro SW-PBIS Winter Training

    2. Outcomes • Be able to articulate the main features of PBIS and how “managing non-classroom settings” fits in. • Be able to identify non-classroom settings and explain how they differ from classroom settings. • Be able to describe at least specific 3 strategies for managing non-classroom settings.

    3. Outcomes (cont.) • As a team, be able to develop and implement procedures for managing non-classroom settings with respect to: • the Basic Management Considerations and Practices listed on p.80 of the workbook, • the Guidelines on p. 81 of the workbook.

    4. How will we get there? A metaphor and review Non-classroom definition and examples Managing non-classroom settings Supported planning

    5. A metaphor for the work: How is managing non-classroom settings like tending a garden?

    6. Successful plants are linked to gardens • that are fertilized, tilled, watered, and weeded. Garden Logic (Modified from Zins & Ponti, 1990)

    7. Systems Logic Successful student behavior is linked to school climates that are effective, efficient, relevant, and durable (Zins & Ponti, 1990)

    8. Garden/ SystemsLogic School Climate Successful Behaviors Effective Efficient Relevant Durable Laying the foundation for PBIS (managing non-classroom settings, for example) is like fertilizing a garden.

    9. How does “managing non-classroom settings” fit in with the features of PBIS?

    10. How do we approach our work? Outcomes Data Practices Social Competence & Academic Achievement Systems Supporting Student Behavior Supporting Staff Behavior Supporting Decision Making

    11. 5 Systems Non- Classroom Classroom Family School- wide Student

    12. Tiers of Interventions Strategies Few Some All

    13. Outcomes • Be able to articulate the main features of PBIS and how “managing non-classroom settings” fits in. • Be able to identify non-classroom settings and explain how they differ from classroom settings. • Be able to describe at least specific 3 strategies for managing non-classroom settings.

    14. Outcomes (cont.) • As a team, be able to develop and implement procedures for managing non-classroom settings with respect to: • the Basic Management Considerations and Practices listed on p.80 of the workbook, • the Guidelines on p. 81 of the workbook.

    15. Non-classroom Problem Behavior Examples • Crowding at stairs and in hallways • Fighting at lunchtime • Teasing on the playground • Pushing in the halls before school • Leaving a mess in the lunchroom

    16. Non-classroom Settings • Particular times or places where supervision is emphasized • Cafeteria, hallways, playgrounds, bathrooms • Buses & bus loading zones, parking lots • Study halls, library, “free time” • Assemblies, sporting events, dances • Where instruction is not available as a behavior management tool

    17. Classroom vs. Non-classroom • Classroom • Teacher directed • Instructionally focused • Small # of predictable students • Non-classroom • Student focused • Social focus • Large # of unpredictable students Workbook p.80

    18. At your table can you agree and explain you position? • Classroom or Non-classroom? • Lunchtime in the cafeteria • Class field trip to the theater • School library with 3 teachers and their students • Bus loading

    19. Outcomes • Be able to articulate the main features of PBIS and how “managing non-classroom settings” fits in. • Be able to identify non-classroom settings and explain how they differ from classroom settings. • Be able to describe at least specific 3 strategies for managing non-classroom settings.

    20. Outcomes (cont.) • As a team, be able to develop and implement procedures for managing non-classroom settings with respect to: • the Basic Management Considerations and Practices listed on p.80 of the workbook, • the Guidelines on p. 81 of the workbook.

    21. Managing Non-classroom Settings

    22. Workbook p.80

    23. Physical / Environmental Arrangements

    24. Lunch Line Hungry Students Serving Area

    25. Lunch Line Serving Area

    26. Making the Preferred Choice Fun

    27. White Space

    28. What Physical / Environmental Arrangements can you make that would help your school?

    29. Routines and Expectations

    30. Dismissal Routine Students are ready to leave whenbuses are called. Stay with the class until bus is called. Walk quietly with staff to bus. Sit in assigned seat quietly. Keep hands and feet to yourself. Follow all staff instructions.

    31. Entering the Cafeteria • Each class is assigned a specific time to go the cafeteria (e.g. 11:00, 11:04, 11:08). This eliminates long lines and substantially reduces disruptive behaviors. • An enter and exit traffic pattern is followed. Students bringing their own lunch go directly to their assigned table. • All students are assigned seats. • A cup is placed on the table for the first 5 minutes, indicating no talking to ensure lunch is eaten. Aides keep time so cups are removed after 5 minutes. • 5 minute timers are also placed on the tables, so students can monitor how long they need to stay quiet.

    32. Assembly Routine Routine • Walk into assembly quietly. • Stay with your class. • Sit in one spot during assembly. • Keep hands and feet to yourself. • Quiet mouth • Clap appropriate. • Leave quietly with your class.

    33. Where could routines help your school?

    34. Teach directly expected routines in context

    35. Cafeteria Routine Teaching Activity • Role play routine in class, and practice the routine. • Teacher role play and make mistakes so the students can verbally correct. • Show icon and have the students label the step. • Cut the sentence from the icon, and play memory matching icon to sentence. • Make two copies of icons and play memory. • Discuss how to be safe, be respectful, and be cooperative in the cafeteria. • State expectation and have student state if it is safe, respectful, or cooperative. • Discuss steps to routine and guide students through each. • Write the steps as discussed. • Review sequence of routine. • Copy icons and have the students write a sentence to form a book of routines. (maybe a guided writing activity?) • Teaching Examples • Example: • A student follows the steps to the cafeteria routine. • Non examples: • A student goes in the “out” door. • A student jumps ahead of others in line. • A student is loud in the cafeteria. • After the Lesson • Remind the students of the routine before leaving the classroom and while in the cafeteria.

    36. Assembly Routine Teaching Activity • Brainstorm steps to routine and guide students to the steps listed. • Write the steps as discussed. • Review sequence of routine. • Copy icons and have the students write a sentence to form a book of routines. (maybe a guided writing activity?) • Role play routine in class, and practice the routine. • Teacher role play and make mistakes so students can verbally correct. • Show icon and have the student label the step. • Cut the sentence from the icon, and play memory matching icon to sentence. • Make two copies of icons and play memory. • Discuss how to be safe, be respectful, and be cooperative in the assembly. • State expectation and student state if it is safe, respectful, or cooperative. • Teaching Examples • Example: • A student follows the steps to the assembly routine. • Non examples: • A student moves from seat to seat. • A student is loud during the assembly. • After the Lesson • Remind the students of the routine before leaving the classroom and in the assembly.

    37. The Crazy Stairwell Landing

    38. Video for Staff Training • Hallway, Library (start at 2:00) – Also example of staff training.

    39. How could you teach non-classroom routines at your school?

    40. Precorrect and Remind

    41. Waukee HS PBIS Proper Assembly Behavior

    42. Precorrection • Identify & analyze setting in which problem behavior is most likely to occur. • Behavior triggers & function of behaviors • Expected & acceptable behaviors

    43. Precorrection • Before • Modify setting • Check-in w/ student • (Re)teach & remind • Reinforce • Re-direct

    44. Precorrection • During • Monitor & reinforce • Re-direct • After • Reinforce • Revise, (re)teach, remind

    45. Positively reinforce expected behavior