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Report Card 2008

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  1. Report Card 2008 Start Up Presentation Presented January 9, 2009 Maren Hess Director, Institutional Research

  2. Student Outcomes / Goals Fall 2005 cohort, status as of Spring 2008 (150% of time for completion)

  3. Student Outcomes / Goals Fall 2005 cohort, status as of Spring 2008 (150% of time for completion)

  4. Charge: Part-time Student Focus • If part-time students make up approximately half of CCC’s student body, what are we doing to keep them as persisting students? • If only 5 students out of 118 (Fall 2005 cohort) who intended to graduate actually did by Spring 2008, what happened to the other 113?

  5. 2006-7 was the first year that CCC was surpassed by these three institutions.

  6. Enrollment History: 1997-2008 • CCC has increased ~ 4% AAFTE • Jamestown has increased ~ 15% AAFTE • Genesee has increased ~ 40% AAFTE • Tompkins-Cortland has increased ~ 65% AAFTE • Of all 30 SUNY CCs, since 1997, only 5 have had less than 5% AAFTE growth since 1997-98, including CCC

  7. Charge: Enrollment • CCC has targeted different markets with different venues • 25 other community colleges have figured out how to attract more students, what can we learn from them? • What else can CCC do to not only attract but keep these additional students?

  8. Preliminary estimates of retention for the Fall 2007 cohort into Fall 2008 are at 58%

  9. Charge: Retention vs. PersistenceConflicting Terminology • View retention as within semester • A student starts a semester (actively registered at census) and finishes the same semester • View persistence as between semester • A student starts a semester (actively registered at census) and returns the next semester Currently, these are interchangeable in current literature, but if we decide on terminology locally, CCC can focus all its efforts and work together to provide retention or persistence services for its students.

  10. These data reflect the percentage of students from an initial First-time, Full-time, fall cohort who have either graduated or are persisting and still enrolled at the institution. The top ranked value for each cohort year (e.g. "best" retention rate) is highlighted in green; the lowest is in red.

  11. These data show the percentage of students who transfer to anotherSUNY institution by their second fall semester.

  12. Graduation and persistence two years after initially starting Associate’s Degree. CCC has a lower persistence rate at two years than both the peers and all SUNY CCs. Attrition rate would be calculated by subtracting these data from 1.

  13. The three-year graduation rate for CCC students is higher than our peers, andslightly above our nine year average. These data reflect the 150% allotted timeto graduate from a two-year program. The difference between our two-year graduation rate ( four year x = 12.5%) and our three-year graduation rate (four year x = 26.5%) demonstrates that weare a three-year Associate’s Degree institution rather than a two-year institution.

  14. The black lines indicate the four year average for these other institutions.

  15. The one year persistence rates of CCC transfer-out students is slightly below the persistence rates of our peers for students transferring to SUNY Senior institutions.However, the spread is slim.

  16. Two-thirds of all responding graduates from the Class of 2006 were employed locallyin Chemung, Schuyler, and Steuben Counties. Over eighty percent of Career Programgraduates employed full-time were in a position related to their field of study.

  17. More than 75% of transfer program graduates from the Class of 2006 continuedtheir education, some of whom were also employed.

  18. Self-reported data by graduates. Almost 75% of responding graduates noted thatat least 75% of their CCC credits were accepted at the transfer institution.

  19. The nursing division pass rates for the NCLEX continue to surpass those of two-year and four-year New York State institutions.

  20. NCCBP: National Data

  21. Definitions: • Retention Rate: Proportion of students who did not withdraw from courses during the term. • Completer Success Rate: Proportion of students who enrolled and did not withdraw from • courses and completed those courses with grades of A, B, C, or P. • Career Program Completers:Proportion of students noting employment or educationaltransfer on the Graduate Survey, administered one year after graduation. This is self-reported by the graduates. These data represent the Fall 2005 cohort, unless otherwise noted.

  22. Definitions: • Retention Rate: Proportion of students who did not withdraw from courses during the term. • Completer Success Rate: Proportion of students who enrolled and did not withdraw from courses and completed those courses with grades of A, B, C, or P. • Persistence Rate: Proportion of total credit students at the end of fall 2005 term (excluding high school students) who either graduated or enrolled in the given term. Next-term would be spring 2006, fall-fall would be fall 2006. • Enrolling from High School: Proportion of students graduating in the three county service area of Chemung, Schuyler, and Steuben Counties the previous spring who subsequently enrolled at CCC for the fall semester.

  23. Charge: Distance Learning • Several years ago, CLARUS suggested that we offer 20% of our coursework online. • Our Strategic Plan included moving 20% closer to that goal, of offering 20% of coursework online. • CCC offers less than 5% of total sections and total credit hours online • If CCC strove to have more online offerings, could we attract students from a wider vicinity?

  24. Additional Discussion?