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Grading and Evaluation

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  1. Oindrila Roy Doctoral Candidate, Political Science oroy@kent.edu Casey Myers Doctoral Candidate, Curriculum & Instruction cmyers5@kent.edu Grading and Evaluation

  2. Goals for this session We willnot spell out for you how to grade or design specific assessments. We will give you insight into key aspects of evaluation from a TA’s perspective

  3. Feedback Feedback is • Not the same as grading • Instrumental in creating a learning-intensive versus a grading-intensive environment • Time-sensitive • Most effective at increasing students’ motivation to learn when it is frequent, constructive, and multi-modal (Brophy, 2004)

  4. Creating Learning Assessments The format of learning assessment will largely be determined by the existing course structure (e.g., cumulative exams, quizzes, term papers, portfolios, etc.) • Look to past syllabi, talk with previous instructors, ask your advisor • Give students multiple opportunities to demonstrate learning (if possible) • Tie assessments to learning outcomes stated on syllabus

  5. Assessing Learning (Anderson & Krathwohl, 2001) (Bloom & Krathwohl, 1956)

  6. Grading Policies The policies and procedures for should be clearly defined in syllabus with regard to • Whether or not grades will be curved • Consequences for late/missed assignments • The percentage/relative points assigned for each assignment or exam • Rubrics for each assignment • How points will be distributed for group projects

  7. Grading Disputes Utilize the 24-hour rule • Remember to model maturity Keep records of all conversations (eye witness?) Be sure alternative assignments are fair Reiterate - grading is not a personal judgment Use rubrics and samples to demonstrate how the grade was decided upon

  8. Self-Evaluation Your students will formally evaluate the course (and you) at the end of the semester, but… • Ask for feedback from advisors and fellow TAs to improve as the semester progresses • Use weekly, quarterly, or mid-term student evaluations to catch issues before they become problems

  9. Important Resources • FERPA • Family Educational Rights/Privacy Act of 1974  • http://www.kent.edu/registrar/info/records_policy.cfm • Policy Register • Compilation of official university policies • http://www.kent.edu/policyreg/index.cfm • Grade processing • FAQs on how to enter grades, deadlines, etc. • http://www.kent.edu/registrar/facstaffgradefaq.cfm#whereenter

  10. Questions? What are your worries, concerns, in terms of evaluating and grading your students? Contact us: cmyers5@kent.edu oroy@kent.edu

  11. References Anderson, L. W., & Krathwohl, D. R. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives. New York: Longman. Bloom, B. S., & Krathwohl, D. R. (1956). Taxonomy of educational objectives: The classification of educational goals by a committee of college and university examiners. Handbook I: Cognitive Domain. New York: Longman, Green. Brophy, J. (2004).Motivating students to learn (2nd ed.). Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence ErlbaumAssociates.