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ESEA Waiver Update Principles 1 & 2 State Board of Education

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  1. ESEA Waiver UpdatePrinciples 1 & 2State Board of Education June 6, 2012 Penny MacCormack Ed.D. NJDOE Assistant Commissioner/ Chief Academic Officer

  2. ESEA Waiver Update Principle 1: College and Career-Ready Expectations Adopt college-and career-ready standards Transition to college-and career-ready standards Transition to college-and career- ready aligned assessments

  3. Adopt College and Career Ready Standards: Common Core State Standards Adopted by New Jersey June 16, 2010 http://www.state.nj.us/education/sca/ccss/timeline.pdf

  4. Transition to CCSS: Why Model Curriculum? • Common Core State Standards • Fewer, clearer, more rigorous • Internationally benchmarked • Commonness • Leverage state and nation-wide expertise (46 States and DC) • PARCC (23 States and DC) • Continuous improvement • Model 1.0 followed by Model 2.0 • Professional Development

  5. Transition to CCSS: Model Curriculum 1.0 & 2.0

  6. Transition to CCSS: Model Curriculum Website • SLO Units currently posted on the web - Math Units 1-4 - ELA Units 1-3 http://www.state.nj.us/education/sca/

  7. Transition to CCSS: Students with Disabilities General and special education teachers, curriculum specialists and child study team members will: • Review content of Student Learning Objectives to identify what students with disabilities and their teachers will need to improve achievement • Develop a model for planning instruction that uses the principles of universal design to identify multiple means of: • Presentation ofthe content • Expression ofwhat students have learned • Engagement methods forsustaining learner attention

  8. Transition to CCSS: ELL Students Teams of school district personnel Scaffold student learning objectives for ELLs Detail the language needed to access SLOs (vocabulary, language forms and conventions, discourse complexity) Outcome – model exemplar units in ELA for each grade, K-12, across language proficiency levels

  9. Transition to CCSS: Involving Higher Education Assist with K-1 formative assessment development Assist with PARCC assessment items and cut scores Increase focus on CCSS in teacher preparation programs

  10. Transition to CCSS: Professional Development Develop an innovative professional development system: CCSS content rigor CCSS pedagogy Leveraging Technology Measures of success Teachers and Administrators On-going

  11. Transition to CCSS: High School Goal = Ready for credit bearing college courses Early Intervention (K-8) High School courses aligned to CCSS PARCC EOC assessments (ELA & Math) Other EOCs (Science & Social Studies) Partnership with Higher Education (cut scores)

  12. Transition to College and Career Ready Assessment: NJASK Transition Timeline Spring 2012 NJ ASK Aligned to NJCCCS Spring 2013 NJ ASK Aligned to the CCSS Spring 2014 NJ ASK Aligned to the CCSS SY 2014-15 Full administration of PARCC assessments “Transitional Assessments”

  13. Transition to College and Career Ready Assessment: PARCC K-2 formative assessment being developed, aligned to the PARCC system • Targeted interventions & supports: • 12th-grade bridge courses • PD for educators Timely student achievement data showing students, parents and educators whether ALL students are on-track to college and career readiness College readiness score to identify who is ready for college-level coursework SUCCESS IN FIRST-YEAR, CREDIT-BEARING, POSTSECONDARY COURSEWORK ONGOING STUDENT SUPPORTS/INTERVENTIONS

  14. ESEA Waiver Update Principle 2: State-Developed Differentiated Recognition, Accountability, and Support Differentiated accountability and support in Priority and Focus Schools

  15. Differentiated Accountability and Support: Regional Achievement Centers (RACs) • Through New Jersey’s waiver from provisions of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), the Department of Education has developed a new school accountability system to replace certain provisions of No Child Left Behind. RACs represent the Department’s most ambitious, focused effort to date to improve student achievement across the state: • Shift focus from all schools to low performing schools • Significant resources aligned with proven turnaround principles • State resources and activities coordinated to support RACs The Department is undergoing a fundamental shift from a system of primarily oversight and monitoring to service delivery and support

  16. Differentiated Accountability and Support: Regional Achievement Centers (RACs) • RAC Mission Statement: • New Jersey’s Regional Achievement Centers, struggling schools, and their districts will partner to set clear goals for student growth, put proven turnaround principles into action, and use data to drive decision-making and accountability. Working together, we will meet our shared goal of closing the achievement gap and preparing all of our students for success in college and career.

  17. Differentiated Accountability and Support: Regional Achievement Centers (RACs) RAC Guiding Principles: • Partnership: Regional Achievement Centers, Priority and Focus Schools, and their districts work together. • Research base: School turnaround principles proven to drive student achievement are put into action. • Support: High impact professional development is regularly provided to teachers, leaders, and Regional Achievement Center teams. Resources are targeted to support Priority and Focus Schools. • Accountability: RAC teams, Priority and Focus Schools, and their districts are held directly accountable for results.

  18. 8 Turnaround Principles • School Leadership: Ensuring that the principal has the ability to lead the turnaround effort. • School Climate and Culture: Establishing school environments with a climate conducive to learning and a culture of high expectations. • Effective Instruction: Ensuring teachers utilize research-based effective instruction to meet the needs of all students. • Curriculum, Assessment, and Intervention System: Ensuring teachers have the foundational documents and instructional materials needed to teach to the rigorous college and career ready standards that have been adopted. • Effective Staffing Practices: Developing the skills to better recruit, retain and develop effective teachers. • Enabling the Effective Use of Data: Ensuring school-wide use of data focused on improving teaching and learning, as well as climate and culture. • Effective Use of Time: Redesigning time to better meet student needs and increase teacher collaboration focused on improving teaching and learning. • Effective Family and Community Engagement: Increasing academically focused family and community engagement. Identify schools Assess needs Quality School Review (QSR) and School Improvement Plan Implement targeted interventions aligned to proven turnaround principles

  19. Differentiated Accountability and Support: Regional Achievement Centers (RACs) Subject to revision • Indicates Regional HQ

  20. Differentiated Accountability and Support: Regional Achievement Centers (RACs) RACs website • Mission & Guiding Principles • Priority and Focus Schools • RAC Supports • Career Opportunities • Turnaround Principles • Contact the RACs http://www.state.nj.us/education/rac/

  21. : Differentiated Accountability and Support: Regional Achievement Centers (RACs) Focus School Differentiated Support Data Review - Interventions already in place - Sub-group attendance, discipline & academic data - Sub-group support materials -Student schedules (representative sample) - Work to date to increase parent involvement

  22. Differentiated Accountability and Support: Regional Achievement Centers (RACs) Focus Schools: SWD Curriculum aligned to Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles Collaborative teaching model Use of Data for differentiation PD on CCSS and SWD strategies

  23. Differentiated Accountability and Support: Focus Schools: ELL Use of research based strategies for ELLs Strategies to improve native language support Strategies for scaffolding learning to meet CCSS PD on CCSS and ELL strategies

  24. Regional Achievement Centers: Expert Educators Executive Directors for Regional Achievement lead RAC teams and work directly with LEA leadership Executive Directors for Regional Achievement (7) State Turnaround Coaches work directly with principals and ensure interventions are coordinated & cohesive Content-area specialists partner with school leaders (e.g., data leader) and staff to build capacity in specific turnaround areas Project Managers monitor the progress and success of RAC interventions

  25. Regional Achievement Centers approach 1 2 3 4 Student performance Quality School Review (QSR) School Improvement Plan (SIP) School Accountability Management Major element Spring and fall 2012 Aug – Oct 2012 Sept 2012 – ongoing Ongoing Timing Description Clearly defined metrics to measure implementation progress and initial student outcomes on the SIP intervention activities Baseline evaluation of schools the 8 turnaround principles; replaces CAPA Collaborative plan created by schools, districts, and the RAC staff for specific intervention activities Student performance on 6-week formative assessments; student performance on NJASK and HSPA Example • Formative assessments: • 18 week assessment: 10 point increase from baseline in reading and math • NJASK: • 45% proficiency (4 point increase) in both math and reading in year 1 • Turnaround Principle: Quality of Instruction • QSR Indicator 3.3: Teachers use quality checks for understanding during and at the end of each lesson to inform future instruction. • Evidence of need: • Less than 50% of teachers observed used quality checks for understanding • 50-day review • 95% attendance at targeted PD session • 50 – 70% of teachers observed used high quality checks for understanding • 100-day review • 70 – 90% of teachers observed used high quality checks for understanding • SIP intervention activities on indicator: • Targeted PD for teachers on quality checks for understanding (e.g., wait time) ✓ ✓ ✓