slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Goals of the Day PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Goals of the Day

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 128

Goals of the Day - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 192 Views
  • Uploaded on

New York State Physical Education Profile Trainer’s Manual 2007-2008 developed by: The New York State Education Department in partnership with The New York State Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation & Dance. Goals of the Day. Introduce the NYS Physical Education Profile

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Goals of the Day' - misu


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

New York State Physical Education Profile Trainer’s Manual2007-2008 developed by:The New York State Education Departmentin partnership withThe New York State Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation & Dance

goals of the day
Goals of the Day
  • Introduce the NYS Physical Education Profile
  • Provide staff development experiences that may be used by school district training teams and teachers in their local school districts
  • Provide participants with the opportunity to learn how to use the CD ROM as a resource
  • Provide NYS physical education professionals with a network to help each other learn about and implement the PE Profile
the workshop agenda
The Workshop Agenda

8:00 – 8:30 Registration

8:30 – 11:45 Morning Session

  • Welcome & Introduction
  • Tour of the CD ROM
  • Standard 1A – Introduction
  • Standard 1A – Table Work (CD-ROM Browse Mode)
  • Standard 1A – Table Work (CD-ROM Test Mode)
  • Standard 1A – Debrief

10:30 – 10:45 Break

  • Standard 1B – Introduction
  • Standard 1B – Table Work & Debrief

11:45 – 12:30 LUNCH

12:30 – 2:15 Afternoon Session

  • NYS AHPERD
  • Standard 2 – Introduction
  • Standard 2 – Table Work & Debrief
  • Standard 3 – Introduction & Overview
  • Why implement the PE Profile?
  • Wrap-up
the pe profile
The PE Profile …
  • What it is …
    • a State developed assessment program designed for instructional use with curriculum to help students, teachers, and administrators focus on learning.
    • a source for systematically providing evidence that students are learning and subsequently achieving the NYS Learning Standards.
    • a source for evaluation of the quality of a school district’s physical education program.
  • What it isn’t …
    • a mandated curriculum (curriculum is a local district decision).
    • a grading system (criteria for grading is a local district decision).
    • a graduation requirement (criteria for graduation is a Commissioner’s Regulation and has not changed).
    • a mandated test (the assessment is available for schools to use to provide evidence that students are achieving the Standards).
  • Bottom line … today, a lot of information will be presented … keep in mind the quote –
    • “inch by inch, this is a cinch …yard by yard, this is way too hard”
the cd rom
The CD-ROM …

What it is …

  • a resource that introduces assessments to use with curriculum to help students, teachers, and administrators focus on learning.
  • a resource that provides the means to systematically provide evidence that programs are effective and reflect the achievement of the NYS Learning Standards.
  • a resource to familiarize teachers, administrators, school board members, parents, and students with the New York State Learning Standards and commencement level assessments for physical education.
  • a resource to help teachers and administrators use assessments in physical education program evaluation and development.
  • an interactive opportunity to learn how to assess performance.

What it isn’t …

  • a magic bullet for curriculum development … this will take time.
  • a magic bullet for enabling teachers to immediately score student performance in a reliable way …reliable assessing will take practice.

Teachers will need staff development and practice to use the assessments effectively.

nysed website www emsc nysed gov ciai pe profile htm
NYSED Website (www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/pe/profile.htm)
  • What it is …
    • a resource that is available for up-to-date information
      • for Standard 1A – new assessments / updates for existing assessments
      • for Standards 1B, 2, 3 – the assessment package for the present school year.
    • a resource for Printed Materials (PDFs) for all text and forms in the PE Profile. This is important because it allows teachers and administrators to print only pertinent information needed at the moment. Note: In the case of text, it is usually easier to read printed text as opposed to reading it in scrolled form on the CD ROM.
    • a forum for announcements of “Best Practices,” etc.
  • Unlike the CD ROM, the Website will keep the PE Profile ‘alive.’
where did this all come from why
Where Did This All Come From? Why?
  • Refer to the History Slide Show and insert it here.
new york state learning standards for health physical education and family and consumer sciences
New York State Learning Standards for Health, Physical Education, and Family and Consumer Sciences

Learning Standard 1 (Physical Activity & Fitness)

Students will have the necessary knowledge and skills to establish and maintain physical fitness, participate in physical activity, and maintain personal health.

Learning Standard 2 (Personal and Social Responsibility)

Students will acquire the knowledge and ability necessary to create and maintain a safe and healthy environment.

Learning Standard 3 (Resource Management)

Students will understand and be able to manage their personal and community resources.

naspe content standards
NASPE Content Standards
  • Comparing New York State Learning Standards with NASPE Content Standards
  • NASPE 1995
    • General descriptions 1995
  • NASPE revised 2004
    • General descriptions 2004
    • Summary charts
about the nys physical education profile
About the NYS Physical Education Profile
  • What is the NYS Physical Education Profile?
    • Why physical education needs to be accountable
    • How the results will be used for student and program accountability.
    • How does the Physical Education Profile work?
      • Sport and physical activity performance assessments
      • Cognitive performance assessments
  • Why do we need the PE Profile?
    • Physical education needs a clearly defined focus
    • Assessments should be incorporated within the physical education program
    • Standardized assessments will provide an evaluation tool that is consistent for students and programs throughout the State.
  • Who is responsible for the PE Profile?
    • The stakeholders: NYSED, School Districts, Administrators

Teachers, Students, Parents

using the nys physical education profile
Using the NYS Physical Education Profile
  • Impact on Curriculum
    • The NYS Learning Standards and PE Profile may affect curriculum
  • Impact on Instruction
    • The NYS Learning Standards and PE Profile may affect instruction
  • Student Achievement and Grading
    • The PE Profile addresses both program effectiveness and student achievement and may affect grading
  • Program Accountability
    • The PE Profile can be used to determine program accountability
including students with disabilities
Including Students with Disabilities
  • Assessment Accommodations
  • Instructional Modifications
frequently asked questions
Frequently Asked Questions

This section answers questions related to the Physical Education Profile:

  • What is the Profile …
  • Student exemptions …
  • Student accountability …
  • Implications for programs …
competency and proficiency how rubrics work in sports and physical activities
Competency and Proficiency(how rubrics work in sports and physical activities)
  • Proficient: A student has the skill and knowledge to be an advanced performer and contributor in an organized adult recreational setting.
  • 3 Competent: A student has the skill and knowledge to be comfortable participant and contributor in an organized adult recreational setting.
  • 2 Advanced Beginner: A student needs more practice to develop the skill and knowledge necessary to become a comfortable participant and contributor in an organized adult recreational setting.
  • 1 Beginner: A student is just beginning to acquire the
  • knowledge and skills necessary to participate.
traditional sport categories
Traditional Sport Categories

Team Passing Sports

Net/Wall Sports

Target Sports

Striking Fielding Sports

  • Assessment components are similar:
    • Application of Skills
    • Application of Strategies
    • Application of Rules & Conventions
    • Personal and Social Responsibility
application of skills how rubrics work example team passing sports
Application of Skills (how rubrics work … example – team passing sports)

Students

4. … apply effective skills with few, if any, observable errors in technique. Students consistently and effectively defend and use offensive skills in the presence of defensive pressure.

3. … apply effective skills with errors in technique. Students are inconsistent in defending and in using offensive skills in the presence of defensive pressure.

2. … perform skills showing some elements of correct technique but application is ineffective and inconsistent.

1. … attempt skills but technique is not yet sufficient resulting in consistently ineffective performance.

application of strategy how rubrics work example team passing sports
Application of Strategy(how rubrics work … example – team passing sports)

Students

4. …consistently apply effective strategic play, maintain proper spacing, and make decisions to appropriately adjust to game situations. Students transition smoothly between offensive and defensive roles.

3. … apply appropriate offensive and defensive strategies in relation to other players but seem hesitant or indecisive when reacting to game situations.

2. … use some offensive and defensive skills appropriately but show little evidence of effective contribution to team offense or defense.

1. … use movements that are unrelated to basic game strategy. Students do not contribute to offense or defense.

application of rules conventions how rubrics work example team passing sports
Application of Rules & Conventions(how rubrics work … example – team passing sports)

Students

4. … apply rules interpretation, conventions of play, and terminology with no observable errors. Students announce the score correctly before re-starting play after a score or when asked.

3. … apply major rules, conventions of play and terminology correctly, but make minor errors or may seek confirmation from others. Students announce the score correctly before re-starting play or when asked.

2. … demonstrate a general understanding of the activity but need assistance to correctly apply rules, conventions, terminology and/or scoring.

1. … consistently demonstrate incorrect application of rules, conventions of play, and/or terminology. Students rely on others to play correctly.

personal and social responsibility safety how rubrics work example team passing sports
Personal and Social Responsibility & Safety(how rubrics work … example – team passing sports)

Students

4. … demonstrate fair play and appropriate competitive behavior…participate energetically and safely demonstrating self-control and respect for the positive and safe experience of others… prevent or resolve conflicts without teacher intervention and/or appropriately challenge themselves and others to high levels of performance.

  • … participate energetically and safely demonstrating self-control, fair play, and respect for others.

2. … participate safely and maintain self-control but are inconsistent in energy.

1. … lack self-control at times and/or need reminders and encouragement from others to participate in a safe, fair, energetic, or respectful manner.

physical activity categories
Physical Activity Categories
  • Dance & Aesthetics Activities
  • Outdoor Activities
  • Personal Performance Activities
  • Fitness Activities
    • Components (and their rubrics vary by category)
dance and aesthetic activities
Dance and Aesthetic Activities

Recreational Dance Components

(Ballroom Dance, Line Dance, Square Dance, etc.)

  • Application of skills
  • Performance
  • Personal and Social Responsibility

Performance Dance/Aesthetic Activities Components (Creative Dance, Gymnastics.)

  • Application of skills
  • Performance
  • Choreography
  • Personal and Social Responsibility
outdoor activities camping canoeing orienteering skiing etc
Outdoor Activities(Camping, Canoeing, Orienteering, Skiing, etc.)

Components

  • Application of skills
  • Personal challenge, decision-making, and preparation
  • Application of Safety, Etiquette, and conventions
  • Personal/Social Responsibility & Safety
personal performance activities
Personal Performance Activities

Challenge/Risk Activities

(Wall climbing, Skate boarding, etc.)

Recreational Activities

(Ice skating, In-line Skating, Lap Swim, etc.)

Martial Arts/Combative Activities

(Fencing, Judo, Wrestling, etc.)

Personal Best Activities

(Competitive Swimming, Track & Field, etc.)

slide30
Fitness Activities(Step Aerobics, Weight training, Cardio Kickboxing, Aerobic Activities, Pilates, Tae Bo, etc.)
  • Application of Fitness Principles
  • Application of Skill
  • Personal/Social Responsibility & Safety
the standard 1a 1b connection
The Standard 1A & 1B Connection

Sport & Physical Activity Assessments

Fitness Category

  • Aerobic Performance Activities
  • Cardio-kickboxing
  • Pilates
  • Step Aerobics
  • Tai Bo
  • Water Aerobics
  • Weight Training
standard 1a in review
Standard 1A – in review

Standard 1A is achieved when students demonstrate competency in 6 activities and proficiency in 3 activities found in 3 different categories

  • What teachers have found:
    • Student Accountability – When students understand that they are accountable for specific knowledge and physical performance levels, their attentional focus and energyincreases and learningimproves.
    • Impact on Curriculum & Instruction – When students reach the 9th grade and demonstrate competency or proficiency particularly in the traditional sports found in the team passing category, there is not a pressing need to repeat those activities over the next three years because for those who did not demonstrate competency or proficiency, it is highly unlikely that they will take an interest to practice on their own or will have enough practice during class time to ever become proficient or competent in that activity. This fact immediately creates opportunities to enrich programs by shifting toward the types of activities that students have not yet experienced and might choose to do as adults.
    • Program Accountability – When a climate is established where physical education programs reflect a seriousness for student learning and achievement of the Standards (physical activity, fitness, character/civility/citizenship, resources), there is more respect from other teachers, more resources are available from administrators, and fewer pull-outs take place.
slide44

The Cognitive AssessmentsStandard 1B – FitnessStandard 2 –Personal & Social ResponsibilityStandard 3 – Resource ManagementFor up-to-date information for the NYS PE Profile see: www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/pe/profile.htm

learning standard 1b
Learning Standard 1B

Learning Standard –

Students will have the necessary knowledge and skills to establish and maintain physical fitness, participate in physical activity, and maintain personal health.

Key Idea B for Physical Education –

Students will perform basic motor and manipulative skills. They will attain competency in a variety of physical activities and proficiency in a few select complex motor and sports activities. Students will design personal fitness programs to improve cardio-respiratory endurance, flexibility, muscular strength, endurance, and body composition.

who says standard 1b is important
Who says Standard 1B is Important?

The Issue:

Physical inactivity and lack of knowledge regarding fitness and health-enhancing lifestyles have resulted in a startling rise in childhood and adult obesity, cardio-respiratory risk, type II diabetes, and other lifestyle-related diseases.

The Question:

What is physical education doing about these fitness and health

issues?

The Challenge:

The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Surgeon General have specifically challenged physical education to be an important part of the solution to the nation’s obesity epidemic by providing:

1) opportunities for physical activity, and

2) knowledge for establishing and maintaining health & fitness through an active, health-enhancing lifestyle.

The successful completion of the assessment for Standard 1B shows students are prepared for this adult responsibility.

standard 1b introduction
Standard 1BIntroduction
  • assessments are designed to be part of a comprehensive instructional unit

– assessments are structured as a task comprised of stimulus-based questions based on a scenario that represents a ‘real world’ or authentic situation

  • assessments will require short answer responses in graphic organizers and narratives
  • the assessments are scored using a 4-point rubric
  • student work will show the application of skill and knowledge that is personally useful at present and will be useful during their adult lives
  • answers will show that students can analyze/synthesize/interpret information using charts, graphs, tables, and other visuals
  • answers will show that students can make recommendations or plans based on that information
  • the assessments are designed to be part of a comprehensive instructional unit where students will be held accountable for content knowledge
  • the assessments are not secure.
comparison to naspe standards
Comparison to NASPE Standards
  • New York State Learning Standard – Key Idea B states that “students will design fitness programs …”
  • NASPE Standards state that the physically educated person “exhibits a physically active lifestyle” (1995) or “participates regularly in physical activity” (2004); and that the physically educated person “achieves and maintains a health-enhancing level of physical fitness” (1995, 2004).
  • The NASPE outcomes imply the need for physical activity records and physical fitness test scores. In contrast, New York State Learning Standard 1 – Key Idea B implies the need for a cognitive assessment where students demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary to design personal fitness programs.

Teachers need to be aware that State and National Standards sometimes differ. Such is the case with the Fitness Standards of NYS and NASPE

developmentally appropriate practices naspe
Developmentally Appropriate Practices (NASPE)

Appropriate Practices for Health-Related Fitness and Fitness Testing

To set a context for the fitness education component of a commencement level program and fitness testing, it is helpful to review what is considered appropriate professional practice. NASPE has authored publications for high school, middle school, and elementary school levels that explain appropriate and inappropriate practices on a variety of topics including health-related fitness and fitness testing. These identify key aspects of professional practice for curricula, instruction, and assessment and are presented to provide specific guidelines for instructional practices that support maximum opportunities for developmentally appropriate student achievement. Inappropriate practices identify common practices that are counterproductive or even harmful to the physical, mental, social, and emotional development of children and adolescents, and they should be avoided or changed.

Teachers need to be aware of this information (Standards 1A,1B,2)

standard 1b content
Standard 1B -- Content

Curriculum drives instruction:

  • Health-Related Components of Fitness
  • Health Risk Factors
  • Basic Principles of Fitness
    • Overload, Progression, Specificity
  • FITT Formula
    • Frequency, Intensity, Time, Type
slide53

Standard 1B Content Progression K-12

Independence

Step 5 Problem Solving/Decision-Making

- Program planning

- Becoming an informed consumer

Step 4 Self-Evaluation (7-12)

-- Testing your own fitness

-- Interpreting test results

Step 3 Personal Exercise Patterns (5-12)

-- Selecting personal activities

-- Evaluating exercise programs and sports

Step 2 Achieving Physical Fitness (3-9)

-- Meeting health-fitness criteria

-- Learning to set realistic personal fitness goals

Step 1 Doing Regular Exercise (K-2)

- Learning personal habits

- Learning to exercise correctly and enjoy it

Dependence

practice assessment standard 1b
Practice Assessment – Standard 1B

Groupings for the working session

  • Small groups – 2s, 3s, but no more than 4

Materials needed (participant packet)

  • Task & Scoring Rubric
  • Scenario
  • Graphic Organizers
    • Health/Fitness Profile
    • Exercise/Activity Worksheets
    • Personal Fitness Program
  • Fitness Reference Booklet
  • Class Assessment Record

Other forms will be helpful for teachers when they prepare for practice assessments for students

task standard 1b
Task – Standard 1B

Directions: Read the Scenario and then complete the 3 parts of the assessment

Part 1. Complete the Health/Fitness Profile.

a. In the Risk Factor section place a check in the appropriate box to identify the risk factor type.

b. In the Fitness Interpretations section, interpret each result using the tables/charts found in the Fitness

Reference Booklet and then identify the person’s health/fitness status.

c. In the summary box that follows the Health/Fitness Profile, write a paragraph that summarizes the

interpretations found in the person’s Health/Fitness Profile.

Part 2. Complete the Exercise/Activity Worksheets using your knowledge and the information identified in the Scenario and Health/Fitness Profile for the following health-related components of fitness:

a. State the individual’s short-term goal for the first month.

b. Recommend specific types of exercises/activities that addresses the goals.

c. Determine the intensity of the first day workout for each exercise/activity type based on the FITT Formula.

d. Recommend time and frequency for each exercise/activity type based on the FITT Formula

e. Explain the progression for exercise specificity and overload (Principles of Fitness) that would lead to

achieving the individual’s short-term goal for the first month.

Part 3. Complete the Personal Fitness Program using the information from the Exercise/Activity Worksheets.

a. Identify the physical activities (type) and duration (time) for each day of the first week of the program.

scoring rubric for 1b
Scoring Rubric for 1B

Responses for the graphic organizers and summaries:

4 – … will build on essential information by demonstrating a level of detail and/or a depth and breadth of knowledge that exceeds expectations. Responses will include a thorough understanding of the components of fitness and the ability to create an individualized fitness program to improve fitness levels and accomplish set goals.

(see rubric for specific expectations for 4-level responses in Parts 1,2,3)

3 – … provide essential information that demonstrates an understanding of the components of fitness and the ability to create an individualized fitness program designed to improve fitness levels and accomplish set goals. (see specific for expectations for 3-level responses in Parts 1,2,3)

2 – … address most parts of the task but demonstrate limited knowledge and include notable errors, omissions, or misconceptions about components of fitness programs.

1– … fail to address required parts of the task, show major errors, omissions, and/or misconceptions.

Keep in mind that all three parts of the assessment are scored as a whole

  • Part 1 – Health/Fitness Profile …
  • Part 2 – Exercise/Activity Worksheets …
  • Part 3 – Personal Fitness Program …
task standard 1b part 1 a b c
Task – Standard 1BPart 1 (a,b,c)

Part 1. Complete the Health/Fitness Profile.

a. In the Risk Factor section check the appropriate box to identify the risk factor type.

b. In the Fitness Interpretations section, use the tables/charts found in the Fitness Reference Booklet and identify the person’s health/fitness status.

c. In the Summary box, write a paragraph that summarizes your interpretations from the Health/Fitness Profile.

example scenario 1
Example Scenario #1

Norm, a 17-year old high school senior, was considered an all-round kid. He did well in his studies, was elected to the student government, and was active in intramurals and recreation during all three seasons. His favorite activity is basketball. Norm believed in keeping fit, as he believed that his physical condition would affect the rest of his life. But Norm had been diagnosed with mononucleosis (mono), and after a week in bed he did not participate in any exercise for the next four weeks. Norm was sure that his inactivity had had a negative effect on his fitness. With his recovery complete, Norm is once again ready to participate in recreational sports and to pursue his long time objective to be able to bench press his body weight. Before allowing Norm to push himself, his doctor referred to his medical data, had him fill out a Risk Factor History questionnaire, and evaluated his status for the four health related components of fitness. The doctor gave Norm clearance to begin exercising.

slide60

x

Normal [BMI = 23.0] (Body Composition)

x

x

x

Normal fitness level

x

x

Normal fitness level

x x

Desirable level

x x

Desirable level

x x

Desirable level

Good fitness level (Cardiorespiratory fitness)

Marginal fitness level (Muscle strength)

(Bench press 120 lbs x 9 reps = 154 lbpredicted 1-Rep Max // 1-RM/Weight = 0.96)

Marginal fitness level (Muscle endurance)

High performance (Flexibility)

Good fitness level (Body composition)

Needs to be wary of implications

x

Needs to be wary of implications

x

Needs to be wary of implications

part 1 c health fitness profile interpretation
Part #1 (c) Health/Fitness Profile Interpretation

3 – Level responses would provide correct essential information in a summary review of the health and fitness strengths, weaknesses, and concerns of the individual.

For example, a response might include: “ForNorm, his doctor’s report shows no problems as he scored in the normal range for each item. His fitness test results all can be interpreted as good to marginal, and his risk factors indicate that he should be aware of his family history of cancer and hypertension.”

4 – Level responses would build on the correct essential information (3-Level expectation) by adding a higher level of detail or further information that may be relevant for analysis of health and fitness status and the development of a subsequent fitness plan.

For example, a response might include: “For Norm, his two strength tests indicate marginal results. That fact, coupled with his goal to improve his upper body strength and eventually bench press his body weight should be kept in mind when developing the muscle strength and endurance component of his fitness plan.”

1b task part 2 a b c d e
1B Task – Part 2 (a,b,c,d,e)

Complete the Exercise/Activity Worksheets using your knowledge and the information identified in the Scenario and Health/Fitness Profile

  • a. State the individual’s short-term goal for the first month.
  • b. Recommend specific types of exercises/activities that addresses the goals.
  • c. Determine the intensity of the first day workout for each exercise/activity type based on the FITT Formula.
  • d. Recommend time and frequency for each exercise/activity type based on the FITT Formula
  • e. Explain the progression for exercise specificity and overload (Principles of Fitness) that would lead to achieving the individual’s short-term goal for the first month.
cardiorespiratory fitness part 2 a
Cardiorespiratory Fitness(Part 2.a)

3 – Level responses would provide evidence of correct essential information and a recommendation for a cardiorespiratory fitness goal for the first month.

For example, a response might include: “Information in the Scenario and Health/Fitness Profile suggests that even though Norm’s cardiorespiratory fitness is in the healthy zone, he states he wants to regain the overall fitness levels he had prior to getting mono. Based on this information, his goal for the first month is to improve his cardiorespiratory fitness by improving his score on the Pacer test. Progression toward his goal would be evidenced by periodic journal entries showing change in his performance and/or through retesting.”

4 – Level responses would build on the correct essential information (3-Level expectation) by adding a higher level of detail or further information.

For example, a response might include: “Encouraging Norm to identify specific cardio activity preferences may help him adhere to his plan. Good cardio activities (walking, jogging, step aerobics, swimming, cardio-kick boxing, treadmill) and/or active sports and recreation (biking, soccer, skating, tennis) could increase cardiorespiratory fitness in ways that are fun and interesting to Norm. To determine if progression toward the first month goal has taken place, Norm should be able to exceed the 61 lengths run during his initial Pacer test.”

cardiorespiratory fitness
Cardiorespiratory Fitness

A 3-Level response might include: “For Norm, because it is one of his activity preferences, basketball is recommended.”

A 3-Level response might include:“For Norm, as his cardiorespiratory fitness level improves, he may wish to continue the progression by establishing a higher HR target zone (70%-80%) by changing the intensity of his workout.”

A 3-Level response might include:“For Norm, participating for 30 minutes is recommended.”

A 3-Level response might include: “For Norm, a minimum of 3x/week is recommended.”

A 4-Level response might include: “For Norm, he revealed that basketball is a favorite activity, so he could be encouraged to look for informal (playground) or formal (Y leagues) opportunities to play. If he plays regularly and with enough intensity, basketball would be an appropriate recommendation.”

A 4-Level response might include:“For Norm, his fitness test results (HRrest and Pacer test) indicate good cardiorespiratory fitness suggesting that, although Norm has not exercised in the past five weeks, an initial exercise target zone of 60%-70% is recommended.

The recommendation for Norm would include a reminder that he should periodically check his HR during his workout, and he needs to keep his HR in the target zone (122-142 bpm) throughout.”

A 4-Level response might include: “For Norm, the recommended work-out sessions (basketball) should last at least 30 minutes per session but, given the continuous starts and stops of play, playing longer might be to his advantage. Also, he might be reminded that time needs to be allotted for warm-up and cool-down routines.”

A 4-Level response might include: “For Norm, the recommended frequency of cardiorespiratory exercise to reach his goal would be at least 3x per week but he does not have to limit himself.

muscle strength and endurance part 2 a
Muscle Strength and Endurance (Part 2.a)

3 – Level responses would provide evidence of correct essential information when making a recommendation for muscle strength and endurance fitness goals for the first month.

For example, a response might include: “Information in the Scenario and Health/Fitness Profile suggests that Norm’s muscle strength and endurance fitness test scores are in the marginal zone. He states that he has a specific personal goal of being able to bench press his body weight. Based on this information, his goal for the first month is to improve his muscle strength and endurance, specifically for the upper body. Progression toward his goal would be evidenced by periodic journal entries showing change in his performance and/or through retesting.”

4 – Level responses would build on the correct essential information (3-

Level expectation) by adding a higher level of detail or further

information.

For example, a response might include:“In order to achieve his overall goal to bench press his body weight, he needs first to improve his overall muscle strength and endurance to establish a high level of muscle fitness. Then he can revise his program to specifically improver his upper body strength and thereby reach his goal of bench pressing 140 lbs.”

muscle strength and endurance
Muscle Strength and Endurance

A 3-Level response might include: “For Norm, a circuit on resistance machines that address total body strength and would prepare him to pursue his goal of bench pressing his body weight is recommended.”

A 3-Level response might include: “For Norm, his first day workout on resistance machines would involve lifts at a weight producing exhaustion after 8-12 repetitions in each of his 3 sets. A 10-lift circuit using resistance machines is recommended.”

A 3-Level might include: “For Norm, a total body circuit program of approximately 45-60 minutes is recommended.”

A 3-Level response might include: “For Norm,participation in muscle fitness activities 3x/week is recommended.”

A 4-Level response might include: “For Norm, a circuit of 10 lifts on resistance machines would attend to his needs and goals. A circuit (bench press, knee extension, hamstring curl, biceps curl, heel raise, lat pull-down, triceps press, seated row, back extension, abdominal curl) is recommended.”

A 4-Level response might include: “For Norm, as endurance improves, strength improves (and vice-versa). Over time, Norm could reach his goal of bench pressing his body weight, but he should first concentrate on improving his overall muscle strength and endurance.”

A 4-Level response might include:“For Norm, the standard time allotment of approximately a 60- minutes is recommended. Norm should be reminded that exercise time also needs to be allotted for muscle warm-up and cool-down routines.”

A 4-Level response might include: “For Norm, participation in muscle fitness activities 3x/week on the days he does not play basketball is recommended.”

flexibility part 2 a
Flexibility (Part 2.a)

3 – Level responses would provide evidence of correct essential information when making a recommendation for flexibility fitness goals for the first month.

For example, a response might include: “In order for Norm to realize his goal to maintain his high flexibility, he cannot assume that his basketball and weight training program will suffice. He should include specific flexibility exercises in his daily exercise routine. Maintenance would be evidenced by Norm being able to continue to record a Sit &Reach score of at least 11 inches.”

For example, a response might include: “Information in the Scenario and Health/Fitness Profile shows that Norm’s flexibility fitness test score indicates high performance. Norm’s goal for the first month is to maintain his current flexibility level. Progression (or maintenance) toward his goal would be evidenced by periodic journal entries showing change in his performance and/or through retesting.”

4 – Level responses would build on the correct essential information (3-Level expectation) by adding a higher level of detail or further information.

1b task part 3
1B Task Part 3

Part 3. Complete the Personal Fitness Program using the information from the Exercise/Activity Worksheets.

  • a. Identify the physical activities (type) and duration (time) for each day of the first week of the program.
wrap up standard 1b
Wrap Up - Standard 1B
  • So, what happened to BODY COMPOSITION ?

Body Composition is recognized as one of the four Health-Related Components of Fitness and data related to it is included in the all three subsections of the Health/Fitness Profile (Doctor’s Report, Fitness Test Results, and Risk Factor History). Students are expected to be able to identify poor fitness as it relates to body composition through their interpretation of the data provided in the Fitness Test Results section of the Health/Fitness Profile. Since nutrition, as related to body composition is often taught through other subject areas, body composition is not addressed specifically as part of fitness planning for this assessment.

  • What is on the Website www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/pe/profile.htm
    • Standard 1B Practice Assessment Package
      • Assessment Task & Scoring Rubric
      • Example Scenario #1 & Graph Organizer (plus answer parameters)
      • Example Scenario #2 & Graphic Organizer (plus answer parameters
      • Example Scenario #3 & Graphic Organizer
      • Example Scenario #4 & Graphic Organizer
      • Fitness Reference Booklet
    • Standard 1B Assessment Package
      • Assessment Task & Scoring Rubric
      • 10 Scenarios (from which one is randomly drawn immediately prior to the Assessment) & Graphic Organizer
      • Class Assessment Record Form
  • Wrap up
learning standard 2
Learning Standard 2

Learning Standard –

Students will acquire the knowledge and ability necessary to create and maintain a safe and healthy environment.

Key Idea for Physical Education –

Students will demonstrate responsible personal and social behavior while engaged in physical activity. They will understand that physical activity provides the opportunity for enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and communication. Students will be able to identify safety hazards and react effectively to ensure a safe and positive experience for all participants.

who says standard 2 is important
Who says Standard 2 is important
  • The Issues:
    • Lack of respect for others
    • Lack of respect for difference
    • Violence in schools, neighborhoods, and communities
    • Bullying
  • The Question:
    • What is physical education doing about these issues ?
  • The Challenge:
    • Project SAVE (Safe Schools Against Violence in Education Act) legislation requires schools to provide K-12 instruction inn civility, citizenship and character education. Learning Standard 2 for Physical Education calls for students to demonstrate responsible personal and social behavior, to care and respect themselves and others, and to recognize threats to the environment when engaged in physical activity.
    • Essential Skills and Dispositions (NYSED, 1995) identified the skills and dispositions that prepared students to live well as individuals, family and community members, and be productive in the workplace. It served as a guide for the development of the Learning Standards by acknowledging that these skills and dispositions need to be taught in all subject areas across the curriculum. Many of these skills and dispositions fit into Standard 2 for Physical Education.
standard 2 assessed as behavior in sport physical activity 1a
Standard 2 assessed as behavior in Sport & Physical Activity (1A)

Examples:

Demonstrating appropriate PSR

  • Participate energetically and safely showing self-control and respect for others

Demonstrating personal challenge, decision-making, and preparation

  • Show willingness to challenge self and others to higher levels of performance
  • Make timely decisions and adjust to the unexpected
  • Perform without need for direction or supervision

Safety

– Apply safety procedures consistently and effectively

assessment of personal social responsibility safety sample rubric
Assessment of Personal & Social Responsibility & Safety (sample rubric)

Students

4. … demonstrate fair play and appropriate competitive behavior. Students participate energetically and safely demonstrating self-control and respect for the positive and safe experience of others. Students prevent or resolve conflicts without teacher intervention and/or appropriately challenge themselves and others to high levels of performance.

  • … participate energetically and safely demonstrating self-control, fair play, and respect for others.

2. … participate safely and maintain self-control but are inconsistent in energy.

1. … lack self-control at times and/or need reminders and encouragement from others to participate in a safe, fair, energetic, or respectful manner.

standard 2 cognitive assessment introduction
Standard 2 (cognitive assessment)Introduction
  • assessments are designed to be part of a comprehensive instructional unit

– assessments are structured as a task comprised of stimulus-based questions based on a scenario that represents a ‘real world’ or authentic situation

  • assessments will require short answer responses in graphic organizers and narratives
  • the assessments are scored using a 4-point rubric
  • student work will show the application of skill and knowledge that is personally useful at present and will be useful during their adult lives
  • answers will show that students can analyze/synthesize/interpret information using charts, graphs, tables, and other visuals
  • answers will show that students can make recommendations or plans based on that information
  • the assessments are designed to be part of a comprehensive instructional unit where students will be held accountable for content knowledge
  • the assessments are not secure.
slide78

Content – Standard 2Knowledge to create and maintain a safe and healthy environment.Identify safety hazards and react effectively to ensure a safe and positive experience for all participants.

Character

  • Individual who acts consistently in a just and caring manner. In the physical activity setting shows personal restraint and initiative.

Civility

  • Interpersonal settings requiring the demonstrating of mutual respect, tolerance, and cooperation with another person. In the physical activity setting, refrains from put-downs regardless of differences, and treats others as they wish to be treated.

Citizenship

  • In group settings where success is dependant on effective group membership, shows a willingness to listen and contribute, balancing individual needs with those of the group. In a physical activity setting, puts the good of the team ahead of personal gain.
practice assessment standard 2
Practice Assessment – Standard 2

Groupings for the working session

  • Small groups – 2s, 3s, but no more than 4

Materials needed (participant packet)

  • Task & Scoring Rubric
  • Scenario
  • Graphic Organizers

Other forms will be helpful for teachers when they prepare for practice assessments for students

task standard 2 assessment
Task – Standard 2 Assessment

Directions: Read the Scenario and then complete the 2 parts of the assessment.

Part 1. In the Graphic Organizer give examples of behaviors demonstrating appropriate or inappropriate character, civility, and citizenship exhibited by individuals or groups in the Scenario.

Part 2. Write an Essay based on the Scenario and the completed Graphic Organizer. Identify a person or group form the Scenario who is demonstrating behavior that shows a lack of character, civility, and/or citizenship. Indicate why you think that behavior is inappropriate.

Then describe in detail what the person or group might do differently in order to act in a way that is consistent with good character, civility and/or citizenship. Explain your answer.

scoring rubric for standard 2
Scoring Rubric for Standard 2

Responses in graphic organizers and summaries:

4 – …will build upon essential information by demonstrating a level of detail and/or a depth and breadth of knowledge that exceeds expectation. Responses include a thorough understanding of character, civility and citizenship in a physical activity setting. Behaviors identified are correctly related to character, civility and citizenship concepts. Conclusions are reasoned, highly detailed, and identify both essential information and obvious and more subtle factors relevant to the specific scenario.

3 – …provide essential information that demonstrates an understanding of character, civility and citizenship in a physical activity setting. Behaviors identified are correctly related to character, civility and citizenship concepts. Conclusions are reasonable and identify basic factors relevant to the specific scenario with no major errors in interpretation. Level of detail is sufficient to show satisfactory understanding of the concepts

2 – …address most parts of the task but demonstrate limited knowledge and include omissions, notable errors, misapplications and/or misconceptions about character, civility and citizenship.

1- …fail to address required parts of the task and show omissions, major errors, misapplications and/or misconceptions.

Keep in mind that all parts of the assessment are scored as a whole

example scenario 2
Example Scenario #2

Duncan is the new captain of the soccer team. He is also in the 3rd period physical education class with James, a new student in the 10th grade. James had some trouble fitting in at this school. Physical education class has been a particular problem for him. He is overweight, not very good in sports, and shy. James’ gym locker is next to Duncan’s. In the locker room after class, one of Duncan’s teammates starts teasing James, laughing at him and making fun of his clothes. Duncan knows this is making James miserable, and thinks about how he can step in to stop this bullying. Duncan makes a joke to his teammate, deflecting the attention, and easing the tension for today, but he knows he will have to do more if James is going to be a able to get through physical education classes this year without being a target for some of the other boys. He thinks about talking to his teacher about the situation, but decides he has to deal with his teammate on his own, and plans what he will say or do to resolve the situation.

slide86

Part 1(graphic organizer)

Part 2. Write an essay based on the Scenario and the completed Graphic Organizer. Identify a person or group from the Scenario who is demonstrating behavior that shows a lack of character, civility, and/or citizenship. Indicate why you think the behavior is inappropriate. Then describe in detail what the person or group might do differently in order to act in a way that is consistent with good character, civility and/or citizenship.

wrap up standard 2
Wrap up – Standard 2
  • What is on the Website
    • Standard 2 Practice Assessment Package
      • Assessment Task & Scoring Rubric
      • Example Scenario #1 & Graph Organizer
      • Example Scenario #1 & Graphic Organizer with answer parameters
      • Example Scenario #2 & Graphic Organizer
    • Standard 2 Assessment Package
      • Assessment Task & Scoring Rubric
      • 6 Scenarios (from which one is randomly drawn immediately prior to the Assessment) & Graphic Organizer
      • Class Assessment Record Form
  • Wrap up - Questions
learning standard 3
Learning Standard 3

Learning Standard –

Students will understand and be able to manage their personal and community resources.

The Key Idea for Physical Education –

Students will be aware of and able to access opportunities available to them within their community to engage in physical activity. They will be informed consumers and be able to evaluate facilities and programs. Students will also be aware of some career options in the field of physical fitness and sports.

who says standard 3 is important
Who says Standard 3 is Important?
  • The Issues:
    • Knowledge of the interaction of factors that influence the physically active lifestyles of adults
    • The enabling factors including environmental variables such as access to facilities, equipment, and programs.
    • Knowledge as a consumer
    • Knowledge as a participant in a physically active lifestyle
    • Adherence factors … why people are not physically active
  • The Question:
    • What is physical education doing about the issue enabling people to be physically active ?
  • The Challenge:
    • Do graduates know what they need to know to live a physically active lifestyle?
    • Do graduates have the confidence and skill to be physically active?
standard 3 introduction
Standard 3 Introduction
  • assessments are designed to be part of a comprehensive instructional unit

– assessments are structured as a task comprised of stimulus-based questions based on a scenario that represents a ‘real world’ or authentic situation

  • assessments will require short answer responses in graphic organizers and narratives
  • the assessments are scored using a 4-point rubric
  • student work will show the application of skill and knowledge that is personally useful at present and will be useful during their adult lives
  • answers will show that students can analyze/synthesize/interpret information using charts, graphs, tables, and other visuals
  • answers will show that students can make recommendations or plans based on that information
  • the assessments are designed to be part of a comprehensive instructional unit where students will be held accountable for content knowledge
  • the assessments are not secure
standard 3 content
Standard 3 -- Content
  • At the commencement level for Standard 3 students should learn how to consider alternatives available to them and be able to choose safe and effective products, facilities, and programs for physical activity and exercise.
  • In order to become an independent participant in physical activity outside of school settings in their adult lives students will need
    • to be aware of opportunities beyond school, be able to access reliable information, and evaluate advantages and disadvantages of facilities, equipment, and programs and
    • be able to analyze the factors that influence individuals to adopt and sustain a physically active lifestyle
standard 3 content continued
Standard 3 Content (continued)
  • Consumerism
  • Adherence Variables
    • Stages of change for establishing a healthy, physically active lifestyle
    • Barriers to starting or sustaining a physically active and healthy lifestyle
    • Support systems for starting or sustaining a physically active and healthy lifestyle
    • Decision-making skills as a consumer of physical activity products, facilities, and programs
practice assessment standard 3
Practice Assessment – Standard 3

Groupings for the working session

  • Small groups – 2s, 3s, but no more than 4

Materials needed (participant packet)

  • Task & Scoring Rubric
  • Scenario
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Advertisements (2)
  • Class Assessment Record

Other forms will be helpful for teachers when they prepare for practice assessments for students

task standard 3 assessment
Task – Standard 3 Assessment

Directions:

Read the scenario and two advertisements. Determine the person’s exercise goals and personal needs, and then compare them to the exercise opportunities and other features (advantages) offered in the two advertisements. Based on your conclusions, write an essay recommending the choice of a fitness program that best meets the goals and needs of the person. Completing the three charts below will help you identify the most important information you will need for your essay. Turn in both the competed charts and your essay.

scoring rubric for standard 3
Scoring Rubric for Standard 3

Responses for the graphic organizers and summaries

4 – …will build upon essential information by demonstrating a level of detail and/or depth and breadth of knowledge that exceeds expectations. Responses will included a thorough understanding of how to evaluate physical activity resources in the community as they relate to the individual's activity goals and personal concerns

(see rubric for specific expectations for 4-level responses for Parts 1&2)

3 – …provide the essential information that demonstrates an understanding of how to evaluate physical activity resources in the community as they relate to an individual’s activity goals and personal concerns

(see rubric for specific expectations for 3-level responses for Parts 1&2)

2 –… address most parts of the task but demonstrate limited knowledge and include omissions, notable errors, misapplications, and/or misconceptions about physical activity resources in the community as they relate to an individual’s activity goals and personal concerns.

1 – …fail to address required parts of the task and show omissions, major errors, misapplications, and/or misconceptions

Keep in mind that all parts of the assessment are scored as a whole

example scenario 199
Example Scenario #1

Your aunt has just returned from her yearly medical exam reporting that her doctor has recommended that she begin exercising on a regular basis. The doctor wants her to begin doing low intensity cardiorespiratory exercise at least three times per week to help keep here borderline blood pressure and weight in check. If possible she should add some basic flexibility and strength exercise as well, especially to prevent lower back problems. Above all he wants her to find a way to build some regular exercise into her lifestyle.

Your aunt is a 30 year-old 9:00-5:00 office worker who works in your community, lives alone outside of town, and has a very active social life. Up to now she has never liked physical activity and has never tried to exercise on a regular basis. She had hoped to avoid it, but now knows she has to do something to prevent serious health problems. She is weighing the pros and cons of two advertisements she is considering as possibilities and asks your advice as to which of these two would best meet her needs.

wrap up standard 3
Wrap up – Standard 3
  • What is on the Website www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/pe/profile.htm
    • Standard 3 Practice Assessment Package
      • Assessment Task & Scoring Rubric
      • Example Scenario #1 & Graph Organizer
      • Example Scenario #1 & Graphic Organizer with answer parameters
      • Example Scenario #2 & Graphic Organizer
      • Advertisements (2)
    • Standard 3 Assessment Package
      • Assessment Task & Scoring Rubric
      • 6 Scenarios (from which one is randomly drawn immediately prior to the Assessment) & Graphic Organizer
      • 4 Advertisements (from which 2 are randomly drawn immediately prior to the Assessment
      • Class Assessment Record Form
  • Wrap up - Questions
discussion teachers and directors
Discussion: Teachers and Directors
  • How could the PE Profile strengthen your program ?
  • How could it be phased in ?
  • What are the barriers ?
  • What are the solutions ?
why should schools implement the pe profile
Why should schools implement the PE Profile ?
  • No Child Left Behind
  • Societal Issues Addressed by PE Standards
    • Issues: schools are constantly challenged by the media and politicians to make a difference addressing issues like
      • Obesity
      • Lack of physical activity
      • Character development
      • Assuming responsibility as an adult
    • Solutions: the NYS Learning Standards address these in the context of physical education programs
    • The assessments help districts focus their programs on widely accepted goals
why should schools implement the pe profile106
Why Should Schools Implement the PE Profile
  • Students, parents, and teachers will have an understanding of expectations and requirements in physical education.
  • Assessments will drive a curriculum.
  • Implementing standardized assessments can provide consistency in teaching and in holding students accountable for learning.
  • Consistency in instruction will eventually provide consistency in grading and grade justification.
  • The Profile can be a powerful public relations tool.
  • The Profile can be an effective tool in developing and justifying budgetary needs.
practical ideas for implementation
Practical ideas for Implementation

Step #1 – Develop a Mission Statement K-12

  • Begin with the big picture –

The K-12 physical education department discusses and agrees upon what a student needs to know and demonstrate by the time they graduate.

Check to see whether the mission incorporates the Learning Standards.

implementation
Implementation
  • Step #2 – Curriculum Mapping
    • Once the Mission Statement is in hand, the existing K-12 curriculum needs to be reviewed to determine which parts of the program address the mission statement and learning standards. Map out the program areas that are and are not consistent with the mission.
implementation109
Implementation
  • Step #3 - The Gap Analysis
    • Once the task of curriculum mapping is completed, identify any content that is not being taught but should be taught
implementation110
Implementation
  • Step #4 – Program Accountability
    • Determine whether students are achieving the learning standards. Teachers are only able to validate learning by assessing students.
    • Select and try out one assessment. All teachers should use the same assessment
    • Consider building the score students earn on the assessment into the unit grade.
    • Plan other assessments to try.
implementation111
Implementation
  • Step #5 – Benchmark Grade Levels
    • Design assessments at the elementary and middle school levels (e.g., grades 2,5,8) that show how students are progressing toward the achievement of the Standards.
    • All teachers should assess in the same way if the results are to be useful in making decisions.
implementation112
Implementation
  • Step #6 – Record-keeping system
    • The next step involves the development of an easy-to-manage record keeping system that will follow the student
    • NOTE:
      • Standard 1A – Students are responsible for attaining competency in 6 activities and proficiency in 3 activities in a minimum of three different categories
      • Standards 1B, 2 & 3 – Students are responsible for attaining competency or proficiency in all three cognitive assessments.
implementation113
Implementation
  • Step #7 – Reporting Results
    • Inform the district stakeholders of the quality of the physical education program. Build support for your program by showing them credible evidence you your success and your needs.
    • Make your results available to your

Administration

Board of Education

Faculty

Parents

Students

implementation114
Implementation
  • Step #8 – Re-establishing a Grading System
    • The next step is optional … some school districts will choose to establish a district-wide grading system that includes assessment results, while others will not.
different schools different strategies
Different Schools… Different Strategies
  • Strategies for implementing the Profile will vary from school district to school district.
  • Every district is at a different place regarding curriculum development, administering assessments, and validating that students have met the Learning Standards.
will there be changes for pe teachers
Will there be changes for PE teachers?

Concerns:

  • It will involve additional paper work for teachers. Teachers will not only be expected to administer assessments but also read and analyze student responses.
  • Accurate record keeping becomes extremely important.
  • If assessments are included in a grading system there may be significant changes in student grades.
  • Parents may call and express concerns about assessing their children in physical education class. They will tend to focus on all the responsibilities their children have in other subject areas, and they don’t have time to study for a test in “gym class.”
changes continued
Changes (continued)

Positive Impact:

  • Students and parents will have a clear understanding of learning expectations in physical education class.
  • Teachers will be held accountable for teaching the curriculum and students will be held accountable for learning.
  • The administration will have an improved understanding of the learning that takes place in a physical education class. This may lead to smaller classes and fewer program changes throughout a school year. Fewer students may be pulled out of a physical education class for other school obligations.
  • Physical education teachers will be able to validate the learning that takes place in their classroom.
  • There can be a consistency in teaching and grading from class to class.
pe profile assessments can influence pe programs k 12
PE Profile assessments can influence PE programs K-12

“Assessment drives the curriculum”

  • Design down …
    • The NYS Assessment program for the commencement level establishes the need for ‘bench mark’ assessments for intermediate, upper-elementary, and primary grades
    • The bench mark assessments establishes the need for ‘performance indicators’ to ‘locate’ student progress as they prepare to achieve the commencement level assessments.
  • The CD-ROM can be an effective tool in developing or revising a sequential curriculum.
the entire physical education staff must be on board
Professionally, the entire P.E. Staff needs to understand the value of implementing the Profile.

Entire department should take part in developing an implementation strategy.

The Profile should be phased into a physical education program.

Identify needed staff development for teachers to be effective.

Take advantage of available technology that can be used in record keeping and assessing students.

Include implementation of the Profile as part of a teachers end of year evaluations.

The Entire Physical Education Staff Must Be On Board!
everyone on board continued
The current curriculum should be reviewed and adjusted to ensure student success.

Teachers need to establish benchmark assessments at appropriate grade levels.

Address concerns such as class size, equipment and facility needs.

Teachers should know that the superintendent is aware of the Profile.

Everyone on board (continued)
a key factor is communication
A key factor is communication.
  • The CD ROM can be an effective tool in presentations to all constituencies.
  • Parents and students must understand how assessments can have an impact on grading and passing PE.
  • School districts are encouraged to use the Profile to keep their programs strong and aligned with State Learning Standards.
public relations
Public Relations

Use the CD ROM to strengthen your public relations campaign.

The CD ROM can be an effective tool to send the message to the district stakeholders:

  • Administration
  • Board of Education
  • Faculty
  • Parents
  • Students
introducing the profile to students and parents
Assessments are not secured so students will have a clear idea of expectations upfront.

Students should review assessments at the start of a unit.

Post the Profile on a school website.

Develop a brochure that can go home with students and parents.

CD ROM is an effective tool in showing what constitutes competency and proficiency.

If assessments are used in report card grading parents and students should know how grades will be determined.

“Meet the teacher night” provides an opportunity to share the Profile with parents.

Introducing the Profile to Students and Parents
slide124
Do we have what it takes to effectively deal with change ?

Do we have what it takes to provide solutions with ‘cutting edge’ PE programs ?

Do we have what it takes to engage in renewal ?

Do we have what it takes to establish our own professional standards and ‘police’ ourselves ?

Do we have what it takes to step forwardand be publicly accountable for student learning ?

Yes No

Decade Report Card on Professionalism

the quality of a profession

The Quality of a Profession

The quality of a profession is judged on its capacity to deal with change.

The quality of a profession is judged on its capacity to satisfy the the pressing needs of society and to provide solutions to the problems of the times.

The quality of a profession is judged on its capacity and willingness to engage in renewal.

The quality of a profession is judged on its capacity and willingness to establish its own standards and ‘police’ itself.

wrap up
Wrap up
  • Review Goals of the Day
  • What do physical educators need to do ?
    • Everyone has a role
    • Everyone has to be involved
    • Involvement needs to be continuous
    • It must be done at the district level
  • Specifically … our future as a profession is at stake
    • Directors of Physical Education need to provide the leadership
    • Teachers of Physical Education need to provide student and program accountability of student achievement of the Learning Standards
trainer s page slide show topics
Trainer’s Page … Slide Show Topics
  • Introduction - slides 2-7
  • History Presentation - slide 8 (separate)
  • Tour the CD ROM (main menu) slides 9-19
  • Standard 1A Introduction slides 20-31
  • Standard 1A Table Work (browse) slides 32-38
  • Standard 1A Table Work (test) slides 39-40
  • Standard 1A Debrief slides 41-43
  • Standard 1B Introduction slides 45- 54
  • Standard 1B Table Work slides 55-70
  • NYS AHPERD (separate)
  • Standard 2 Introduction slides 71-81
  • Standard 2 Table Work slides 82-87
  • Standard 3 Overview slides 88-102
  • Implementing the PE Profile slides 103-104
  • Wrap Up slides 105-126