identifying entrepreneurial opportunities
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
IDENTIFYING ENTREPRENEURIAL OPPORTUNITIES

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 10

IDENTIFYING ENTREPRENEURIAL OPPORTUNITIES - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 97 Views
  • Uploaded on

IDENTIFYING ENTREPRENEURIAL OPPORTUNITIES. The Entrepreneurs Club September 27, 2004. IDEAS …last for ever …are free …everybody has ideas …do not need customers to survive. OPPORTUNITIES …are perishable …require work …require fit …must create customer value.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'IDENTIFYING ENTREPRENEURIAL OPPORTUNITIES' - keitha


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
identifying entrepreneurial opportunities

IDENTIFYING ENTREPRENEURIAL OPPORTUNITIES

The Entrepreneurs Club

September 27, 2004

ideas are not the same as opportunities
IDEAS

…last for ever

…are free

…everybody has ideas

…do not need customers to survive

OPPORTUNITIES

…are perishable

…require work

…require fit

…must create customer value

Ideas are not the same as Opportunities

Always consider investing in a Grade A man with a Grade B idea.

Never invest in a Grade B man with a Grade A idea.

George Doriot, ‘father’ of the VC industry

inventions new technologies are not the same as opportunities
Inventions – new technologies are not the same as Opportunities
  • The BAR CODE - method of automatic identification and data collection.
    • The first patent for a bar code type product (US Patent #2,612,994) was issued to inventors Joseph Woodland and Bernard Silver on October 7, 1952
    • Bar code was first used commercially in 1966
    • In June of 1974, the first U.P.C. scanner was installed at a Marsh's supermarket in Troy, Ohio. The first product to have a bar code included was a packet of Wrigley‘s Gum.
what is an opportunity
What is an Opportunity?
  • An idea that is timely, attractive, durable anchored in a product or service that creates or adds value for its buyer and user
    • WINDOW - time sensitive (fleeting) occasion
    • ATTRACTIVE – to stakeholders (entrepreneurs, investors, clients)
    • DURABLE – sustainable over time or sustainable long enough to reap expected benefits
the concept of fit
The Concept of FIT

PEOPLE AND

RESOURCES

FAVORABLE

SOCIOLOGICAL

FACTORS

OPPORTUNITY

APPROPRIATE EXPERIENCE

CONTACTS

SKILLS

ATTITUDE

APPROPRIATE RISK/REWARD ALLOCATION AND INCENTIVES

INVESTOR-VALUE-ADDED

CONTEXT

FAVORABLE TECHNOLOGY MACROECONOMY

FAVORABLE RULES OF THE GAME

OPPORTUNITY

PROJECT APPROPRIATE

FINANCING

OPTION PRESERVATION

BUSINESS MODEL

sources of opportunities
Context

The Unexpected

Incongruities

Process need (Dell&Chang/Taiwan Semiconductors)

Industry and Market structures

Demographics

Changes in perception (Case/AOL, Omidyar/eBay, Yang/Yahoo)

New Knowledge (Noyce&Moore/Intel, Boyer&Swanson/Genentech)

Others

Reading trade publications (Gates&Allen/Microsoft)

Engaging in consulting projects (Kelleher/SWA)

Idea arbitrage (Schultz/Starbucks)

Business Models (Amazon)

Sources of Opportunities
people opportunity identification
Perception

Discovery

Creation

Development

Evaluation

Abortion

Venture Formation

People: Opportunity Identification
  • Personality Traits:
  • Creativity
  • Optimism

+

Opportunity Development

Entrepreneurial

Alertness

+

  • Social Networks:
  • Weak ties
  • Partnerships
  • Inner circle

+

+

  • Prior knowledge:
  • Special interests
  • Industry knowledge
  • Customer problems
  • Ways to serve customers
  • Academic background

+

Source: Based on Fig.3 from Ardichvili, Cardozo, Ray (2003) "A theory of entrepreneurial opportunity identification and development« , Journal of Business Venturing

where 100 of the 1989 inc 500 founders got their ideas
Where 100 of the 1989 Inc. 500 founders got their ideas

Systematic search 4%

Swept in by PC revolution

5%

Discovered by luck

20%

Idea from previous job

71%

Source: Amar Bhide (1994), “How entrepreneurs craft strategies that work,” Harvard Business Review (March-April).

good opportunities come from
SIVI

Customers 75% 25%

Employees 59% 37%

Professional acquaintanc 41% 49%

Suppliers 47% 35%

Trade publications 40% 38%

Magazines, newspapers 26% 51%

Good Opportunities come from

NI

  • Investors 54%
  • Technical literature 64%
  • Hobby 63%
  • Libraries 78%
  • Patent Filings 84%

Top of the list

Bottom of the list

VI= Very Important, SI= Somewhat Important, NI= Not Important, VI+SI+NI=100%

Source:

Hills and Schrader, « Successful Entrepreneur’s Insights into Opportunity Recognition », 1998

keep an opportunity register
Keep An Opportunity Register
  • Inventory of your entrepreneurial ideas
  • In a database or ‘diary’, record the following items:
    • Business concept, trends, key data, obstacles, competences & resources, competition (see McGrath & McMillan, Figure 2-1)
  • Technique applied by successful habitual entrepreneurs
  • Increases your chances of realizing the right opportunity at the right time at the right place
ad