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Bruce Warner, Director Oregon Department of Transportation PowerPoint Presentation
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Bruce Warner, Director Oregon Department of Transportation
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  1. A Bi-State Project: Lessons Learned Bruce Warner, Director Oregon Department of Transportation

  2. I-5 CorridorColumbia River Crossings at Portland-Vancouver WASHINGTON BNSF Rail Bridge I-5 Bridge Vancouver Port of Vancouver Port of Portland I-205 Bridge Portland International Airport Portland OREGON

  3. Year 2000 Year 2020 A.M. A.M. 12 12 12 12 1 1 1 1 11 11 11 11 2 2 2 2 10 10 10 10 9 9 9 9 3 3 3 3 P.M. P.M. 8 8 4 4 8 8 4 4 7 7 7 7 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6 Photo: Port of Portland Duration of Morning and Evening Peak-Period Traffic on the I-5/Columbia River Bridge and Approaches in 2000 and 2020

  4. Measure Portland/ Vancouver Chicago Freight Trains 555 1977 Passenger Trains 38 1542 Average Speed 12.3 mph 12.5 mph Hours of Delay 402.0 hrs 813.0 hrs Delay Ratio 18.2% 20.0% Freight Rail Congestion Comparisons (over 96 hour period)

  5. Phase 1 Committee Charge • What is the Magnitude of the Problem in the Corridor? • What Is the Cost of Inaction? • What Improvements are Needed? • How Can the Improvements Be Funded? • What are the Next Steps?

  6. Phase 1 Findings • Doing nothing in the I-5 Corridor is unacceptable. • There must be a multi-modal solution in the I-5 Corridor -- there is no silver bullet. • Transportation funds are limited. Paying for improvements in the Corridor will require new funds. • The region must consider measures that promote transportation-efficient development. • balance of housing and jobs • better traffic management • Region needs to develop strategic plan for the Corridor.

  7. Community Forum Approximately 80-100 members Cross-section of Community Meets six times at major milestones and additionally as needed. Neighborhoods, Businesses, Interest Groups General Public Governors’ Task Force 28 member committee of representatives from Washington and Oregon. Members are from private business, community groups, environmental groups, and the public sector. • State and Regional Decision-making Bodies: • Bi-State Committee • Metro and the Southwest Washington Regional Transportation Council • Oregon and Washington Transportation Commissions

  8. Involvement of the Community • Task Force membership • Community Forum • Design workshops • Public input at milestones • Environmental justice stakeholder meetings • Public comment at meetings

  9. I-5 Partnership Public Outreach Activities • Mailings (up to 45,000 people) • E-mail • Canvassing • 7 rounds of open houses/public meetings • Visits with neighborhood, business and other groups • Website -- information and surveys (over 4,500 primary computers have accessed the site over 330,000 times) • News features & Advertisements -- billboard, media • Information sites -- libraries, coffee shops, etc.

  10. Regional Economic Effects of the I-5 Corridor/Columbia River Crossing Transportation Choke Points prepared for Oregon Department of Transportation presented by Lance R. Grenzeback Cambridge Systematics, Inc. May 2003

  11. Metro Area Population Body of Water Hwy Xings Rail Xings Norfolk 1.57 million Hampton Roads/ Chesapeake Bay 4 0 Cincinnati 1.65 million Ohio River 7 2 Kansas City 1.78 million Missouri River 10 3 Portland-Vancouver 1.92 million Columbia River 2 1 Pittsburgh 2.36 million Three Rivers >30 3 St. Louis 2.60 million Mississippi River 8 2 Comparison of River Crossings in Selected U.S. Metropolitan Areas of Similar Size

  12. Freight Impacts • Congestion will spread into the midday period, which is the peak-travel period for trucks • Annual vehicle hours of delay on truck routes in the I-5 corridor will increase by 93 percent from 13,400 hours in 2000 to 25,800 hours by 2020 • Congested lane-miles on truck routes will increase by 58 percent, and • The cost of truck delay will increase by 140 percent to nearly $34 million

  13. National Freight Flows for Goods with Origins or Destinations in Oregon or Washington Source: Cambridge Systematics based on Reebie Associates TRANSEARCH data, 1998

  14. 0 0.05 0.25 1.0 2.5 10 Origins and Destinations of Truck Freight Crossing I-5 and I-205 Columbia River Bridges, 1998, All Commodities (million tons) Volume of Truck Freight on Routes Used to Access I-5 and I-205 Columbia River Bridges, 1998, All Commodities 0 0.25 0.75 2.5 5.0 33.0 (million tons) Oregon-Washington Origins and Destinations for Truck Freight Crossing the I-5 and I-205 Bridges at Portland-VancouverWith Tonnage of Freight on Truck Routes Used to Access Bridge Note: Commodities shipped to or from British Columbia are assigned to Whatcom County Source: Cambridge Systematics based on Reebie Associates TRANSEARCH data, 1998

  15. 0 0.25 0.75 2.5 5.0 33.0 0 0.05 0.25 1.0 2.5 10 (million tons) (million tons) Oregon-Washington Origins and Destinations for Rail Freight Using the Portland-Vancouver Rail TriangleWith Tonnage of Freight on Rail Lines Used to Access Triangle Note: Commodities shipped to or from British Columbia are assigned to Whatcom County Origins and Destinations of Rail Freight Shipped via Portland-Vancouver Rail Triangle, 1998, All Commodities Volume of Freight on Portland-Vancouver Rail Triangle Access Routes, 1998, All Commodities Source: Cambridge Systematics based on Reebie Associates TRANSEARCH data, 1998

  16. Lessons Learned • Limit project scope to I-5 Corridor. • Do not force a solution. • Be patient and be prepared to spend money. • Work hard to keep all interests/stakeholders at the table. • Be multi-modal. • Focus on the economics. • Ensure equal 50/50 participation by both states. • Be sensitive in dealing with bigger partner/smaller partner.