Chapter 4: Growth and Crisis in Colonial Society, 1720—1765 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Chapter 4: Growth and Crisis in Colonial Society, 1720—1765 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Chapter 4: Growth and Crisis in Colonial Society, 1720—1765

play fullscreen
1 / 12
Chapter 4: Growth and Crisis in Colonial Society, 1720—1765
215 Views
Download Presentation
kasper-molina
Download Presentation

Chapter 4: Growth and Crisis in Colonial Society, 1720—1765

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Chapter 4: Growth and Crisis in Colonial Society, 1720—1765

  2. 1. The population of the New England colonies A. doubled between 1700 and 1750 as a result of natural increase. B. grew dramatically in the early 1700s as a result of immigration. C. doubled every generation between 1700 and 1750, mostly as a result of natural increase. D. remained relatively stable throughout the early 1700s.

  3. 2. To make better use of their land, in the mid-1700s many New England farmers replaced traditional English crops with those that provided a greater yield per acre, such as A. wheat or alfalfa. B. potatoes or corn. C. barley or oats. D. rice or tobacco.

  4. 3. Someone who believes that God created the world but then allowed it to operate according to natural laws without divine intercession is a A. humanist. B. Presbyterian. C. natural philosopher. D. deist.

  5. 4. The central premise of the Enlightenment was that A. devotion and piety were the way to experience God’s grace in a conversion experience. B. human reason had the power to observe, understand, and improve the world. C. an activist God was involved in the everyday affairs of the world. D. everyone’s mind was a blank slate on which basic ideas or principles could be imprinted.

  6. 5. The central legacy of the Great Awakening was the A. movement of religious authority from educated ministers to the believer’s direct experience of God. B. continuing divisions between Old Lights and New Lights. C. new importance of science in American society. D. view of God as a divine “watchmaker.”

  7. 6. The Baptist sect attracted African Americans primarily because A. an overwhelming number of white Baptists welcomed them to revivals with open arms. B. African Americans were wholly without spiritual beliefs and longed for religious instruction. C. its message declared all people to be equal in God’s eyes. D. it criticized the Chesapeake planter elite.

  8. 7. The number of tenants on the vast Dutch manors in the Hudson River Valley rose in the early eighteenth century because A. the market for American wheat boomed. B. the estate owners reduced the amount of land that each tenant could farm. C. freehold land became increasingly scarce. D. the landlords shortened the terms of leases for their tenants.

  9. 8. German migrants to the middle colonies A. settled mostly in cities such as Philadelphia. B. were mostly indentured servants. C. possessed similar gender roles as English colonists. D. did not participate extensively in colonial politics.

  10. 9. Benjamin Franklin’s idea for a policy of colonial cooperation at the Albany Congress was known as the A. Notion of Cooperation. B. Idea of Unity. C. Plan of Union. D. Path of Prosperity.

  11. 10. Why did Indian peoples across eastern and southern North America prefer French fur traders to Anglo-American settlers? • Anglo-American settlers were few in number. • French fur traders were few in number. • The French were allied with the British. • The French gave African slaves to Indian peoples.

  12. Answer Key for Chapter 4 Answer is C Answer is B Answer is D Answer is B Answer is A Answer is C Answer is C Answer is D Answer is C Answer is B