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2011 Summer Professional Development Conference “Preparing College and Career Ready Students”. Warren Craig Pouncey, Ed.D. Deputy State Superintendent Alabama State Department of Education. The New Normal…. State Funding FY2009 : $3,822,035,900 FY2012 : $3,813,380,486 Rolling Reserve Act

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2011 summer professional development conference preparing college and career ready students

2011 Summer ProfessionalDevelopment Conference“Preparing College and Career Ready Students”

Warren Craig Pouncey, Ed.D.

Deputy State Superintendent

Alabama State Department of Education

the new normal
The New Normal…

State Funding

  • FY2009: $3,822,035,900
  • FY2012: $3,813,380,486

Rolling Reserve Act

  • FY2013: $3,950,662,083 projected

Growth: $ 137,281,597

carl d perkins federal funds
Carl D Perkins Federal Funds
  • FY2009: $19,311,200
  • FY2012: $19,175,065
  • Carl D. Perkins Loss: ($ 136,135)
  • Tech Prep Loss: ($ 2,000,000)
teaching units
Teaching Units

All Certified

  • FY 07-08: 49,363.91
  • FY10-11: 47,573.17
  • Loss: (1,790.24) 3.63%

Career Tech

  • FY 07-08: 2,956
  • FY10-11: 2,624
  • Loss: (332) 11.23%
what the law requires
What the Law Requires
  • Foundation Program
  • 16-13-231
    • The total cost of the Foundation Program for any local board of education shall be for teacher’s salaries, fringe benefits, classroom instructional support and OCE.
what the law requires6
What the Law Requires
  • Foundation Program
  • 16-13-231
    • The local board of education shall allocate state and local Foundation Program funds to each school in an equitable manner, based on the needs of the students and the schools, as reflected in the current year’s actual student populations, including at-risks students, students receiving special education services, and students enrolled in vocational/technical educational programs.
what the law requires7
What the Law Requires
  • Foundation Program
  • 16-13-232
    • The grade level divisors for each fiscal year shall be weighted for each grade to provide funding for special education and vocational education. The grade level divisors include for vocational/technical education 7.4% full time equivalent in grades 7-8 weighted 1.4 times the regular student weight and 16.5% full time equivalent in grades 9-12 weighted 2.0 times the regular student weight.
what the law requires8
What the Law Requires
  • Foundation Program
  • 16-6B-8
    • Each area vocational center shall earn a principal (director) and shall continue to earn a counselor should it have received a counselor unit in 1994-1995. Further it is the intent of the Legislature that area vocational centers that are serving more than one school system continue to do so. No local boards shall be permitted to spend fewer state dollars for vocational/technical education than it did during the 1994-1995 school year.
what the law requires9
What the Law Requires
  • Foundation Program
  • 16-13-236
    • Funds provided by the state to local boards of education for vocational/technical education shall be spent only for its intended purposes.
the opportunities ahead
The Opportunities Ahead

Dr. Morton and the State Board have requested that a task force be assembled to examine a new direction for Career and Technical Education in Alabama.

Over the next five months, business and industry leaders, Career Technical educators, students, and other participants will be charged with redefining what and how we offer career tech opportunities to our students.

alabama must face reality
Alabama Must Face Reality!
  • Our challenge is not to exclusively produce more college graduates with bachelor’s degrees
  • Our challenge is to produce graduates with foundational academic knowledge in math and language arts necessary to pursue postsecondary education without remediation. (College Readiness)
  • Students will need to have the ability to apply academics in context.
  • Students will need to be able to apply academic knowledge to authentic situations. (Career Readiness)
we must all take responsibility for instilling employability skills not just career tech
We must all take responsibility for instilling employability skills: (Not just Career Tech)
  • Critical Thinking
  • Adaptability
  • Problem Solving
  • Collaboration
  • Teamwork
  • Creativity
  • Responsibility
  • Professionalism
  • Ethics
  • Use of Technology
slide14
Jobs
  • Over 50% of the new jobs created in the next decade will require a postsecondary education or some sort of occupational certificate.
  • Of these, 27% are projected to make more than the average graduate with a bachelor’s degree.
important facts to remember
Important Facts to Remember
  • 25% of our students drop out before graduating.
  • Only 24% of our high school graduates who took the ACT were college ready in all subject areas.
  • 28% of entering college freshmen enrolled in one or more remedial courses.
  • Only 56% of first time, full time bachelor’s degree-seeking students earned a degree in six years.
previous reforms have yielded limited benefits
Previous Reforms Have Yielded Limited Benefits

Problem 1: Students are not performing adequately because they and their teachers are not working hard enough.

Reform 1: A get tough policy like “No Child Left Behind” that mandates 100% of all students be proficient in all area of measurement by 2014.

previous reforms have yielded limited benefits17
Previous Reforms Have Yielded Limited Benefits

Problem 2: Improving student performance and closing the achievement gap can only occur by implementing rigorous content standards and a core curriculum for all schools.

Reform 2: Use standardized tests to assess students yearly to make sure they are succeeding; punish them and the schools if they fail to meet standards.

previous reforms have yielded limited benefits18
Previous Reforms Have Yielded Limited Benefits

Problem 3: Standardized test scores provide an accurate measure of student learning and should be used to determine promotion and graduation.

Reform 3: Test scores don’t provide an accurate picture of what all students have learned; what it does confirm is that our conventional schools are not meeting the educational needs of a large number of our students.

previous reforms have yielded limited benefits19
Previous Reforms Have Yielded Limited Benefits

Problem 4: The United States should require all students to take Algebra in the 8th grade and higher order math in high school largely to increase the number of scientists and engineers and thus making us more competitive in the global economy.

Reform 4: Forcing students to take four years of math or science without first instilling a passion for the subject is a formula for failure.

California enrolls almost 60% of its 8th graders in Algebra I, but has the nation’s lowest score on NAEP.

previous reforms have yielded limited benefits20
Previous Reforms Have Yielded Limited Benefits

Problem 5: We need to put a highly qualified teacher in every classroom to deliver an excellent education to every student and improve our schools.

Reform 5: The law defines “highly qualified” as a teacher who is certified by a state. Too many universities still offer fragmented coursework and haphazard clinical placements; Schools of education prepare teachers to teach subjects rather than students.

previous reforms have yielded limited benefits21
Previous Reforms Have Yielded Limited Benefits

Problem 6: Having an effective principal in every school would make a difference between a school that works and one that doesn’t.

Reform 6: The many demands on principals are daunting. They are expected to be the CEO, a skilled organizational manager, a strong instructional leader, an inspirational figure, a politician, and a community relations expert.

Current limits restrain the power of principals to be innovative and decisive. They are often caught in the middle between high ranking central office administrators, teachers, parents and students.

previous reforms have yielded limited benefits22
Previous Reforms Have Yielded Limited Benefits

Problem 7: The student dropout rate can be reduced by dropout prevention programs and raising the mandatory attendance age from 16 to 18.

Reform 7: The vast majority of schools are preoccupied with standards, tests, core curricula and rigorous courses. Their main concern is academics and their main objective is for students to get good grades and have a shot at getting into college.

previous reforms have yielded limited benefits23
Previous Reforms Have Yielded Limited Benefits

Problem 8: Making the school day and school year longer will increase student learning.

Reform 8: More time in school will not improve achievement if the time is not spent productively.

Additional time must be tied to:

  • Core Academics
  • Enrichment Opportunities
  • Teacher Planning and Professional Development

Simply doing the same thing for a longer period of time will not close the achievement gaps.

previous reforms have yielded limited benefits24
Previous Reforms Have Yielded Limited Benefits

Problem 9: If we invest more money in public schools, we will be able to provide every student with an excellent education.

Reform 9: If we continue to spend money on a model that doesn’t work instead of one that does, we will continue to need even more funding and continue to get mediocre results.

going forward
Going Forward…
  • How do we ensure the success of the 44% of the students that won’t finish college in six years?
  • How do we change the future of the better than 25% of the students who will drop out before completing High School?
slide26
One…
  • To help motivate children and maximize their abilities, we must educate them one at a time and tailor their education to their interests and needs.
  • This means doing away with teaching all students the same things on the same day in the same way.
  • Students learn best when they are interested in the material. Schools should focus on their interests and use that as a foundation to build on.
  • Help students find their passion and then individualize core competencies around that passion.
slide27
Two…
  • The more educational opportunities available to young people, both in and out of school, the more likely they are to find a pathway to success that is compatible with their unique needs and talents.
  • Future jobs - almost 50% will not require college degrees, but will call for some postsecondary training and/or credentialing.
  • The skills that employers are looking for can be taught in the first eight grades. From that point, students should be able to choose an educational pathway that they believe is compatible with their interests, aspirations, and learning styles. It is time to stop delivering the same education to every high school student.
three
Three…
  • Students will learn more and remember more of what they learned if they learn in real-world contexts, which also reduces boredom and disciplinary problems, stimulates more parental involvement, inspires self confidence and responsibility in students and motivates them to learn.
  • Learning must become…
    • Watching
    • Thinking
    • Feeling
    • Doing
three continued
Three Continued…
  • Learning must begin to include some type of internship program. This internship program serves as real world experiences that creates relevance and should serve as the basis for the core around which each student’s personal curriculum is built.
  • Real-life learning doesn’t always have to happen outside of school; Good teachers can bring it into the classroom.
slide30
Four…
  • Student assessments based on multiple measures, focusing mainly on a students actual work, is a better and fairer way to evaluate student performance than standardized tests.
  • Mastery of content knowledge must be measured by not only formative assessments, but should also include being judged on actual work samples, portfolios, exhibitions, presentations, and internships.
slide31
Five…
  • We are more likely to get effective teachers if we educate teachers differently and modify their traditional role as instructors.
  • A teacher’s role needs to become one of an advisor. These close relationships and open communication help to create a sense of belonging in students. This translates into better grades, higher motivation and graduation rates.
  • Teachers periodically should participate in real world clinical experiences that will enable them to relate work place expectations to their students.