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S400 Behavior Intervention Planning . Functional Behavior Assessment and Behavior Intervention Planning Review FBA Review how FBA/BIP linked to BIP Understanding the BIP Social/Academic Instructional Groups & Social Skills Instruction Mentoring Fidelity Measurement. Agenda.

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agenda
Functional Behavior Assessment and Behavior Intervention Planning

Review FBA

Review how FBA/BIP linked to BIP

Understanding the BIP

Social/Academic Instructional Groups & Social Skills Instruction

Mentoring

Fidelity Measurement

Agenda
slide4

School-Wide Systems for Student Success

Academic Systems

Behavioral Systems

  • Tier 3/Intensive Interventions 1-5%
  • Individual students
  • Assessment-based
  • High intensity
  • 1-5% Tier 3/Intensive Interventions
          • Individual students
          • Assessment-based
          • Intense, durable procedures

6+

2-5

  • 5-15% Tier 2/Selected Interventions
          • Some students (at-risk)
          • High efficiency
          • Rapid response
          • Small group interventions
          • Some individualizing
  • Tier 2/Selected Interventions 5-15%
  • Some students (at-risk)
  • High efficiency
  • Rapid response
  • Small group interventions
  • Some individualizing
  • Tier 1/Universal Interventions 80-90%
  • All students
  • Preventive, proactive
  • 80-90% Tier 1/Universal Interventions
          • All settings, all students
          • Preventive, proactive

0-1 ODR

Illinois PBIS Network, Revised May 15, 2008. Adapted from “What is school-wide PBS?” OSEP Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports. Accessed at http://pbis.org/schoolwide.htm

slide6

Data-Based Decision MakingNumbers to Keep in Mind

  • 7-15%: Percent of total population expected to need and be supported by Tier 2 interventions
  • 1-5%: Percent of total population expected to need and be supported by Tier 3 interventions
  • 70%: Percent of youth (receiving intervention “X”) that should be responding to intervention
  • Data-based decision rules for “determining response” must be defined

Data sources defining response are efficient

e.g., Daily Progress Report (DPR) cards: Student maintains an 80% average on DPR for 4 weeks

pop quiz

What is the difference between a behavioral (or maintaining) consequence and a disciplinary consequence?

(HINT: it has to do with likelihood)

POP QUIZ
simplified fba

Identify a behavior of concern

Define in a way that is observable

Identify predictors in the environment

Things that happen before and after

Identify a function

Why does that happen?

Teach a replacement behavior

What is appropriate way to get same function?

Change the environment to prevent

What could make the problem not happen?

What consequences are functional?

Simplified FBA
slide9

Positive Example

Desired Behavior

Typical Consequence

Concise information presented to problem-solving team for discussion and intervention planning

What all the other kids are doing

What keeps the other kids behaving

Setting Event (Slow Trigger)

Antecedent (Fast Trigger)

Problem Behavior

Maintaining Consequences and Function

BEHAVIORAL function

Acceptable Behavior

Sequence of less “icky” behaviors

Why is function important?

Because consequences compete

review

Brief FBA

Do antecedents occur immediately prior to the behavior?

Are consequences addressing BEHAVIORAL consequences, not just offering a discipline response?

Is behavior specific and measurable?

Does function make sense, based on information provided?

Choose an FBA for team use, developing the BIP

REVIEW
slide11

Functional Behavior Pathways

Routines

Functional

Consequence

Engagement

Curriculum

Disruptive noises

Academic work setting

No direct teacher attention

Teacher provides attention

Time

Raise hand and wait quietly

Physical

Arrangement

Expectations

Examples

Functional

Consequence

Prompts

a context for positive behavior support

A redesign of environments, not the redesign of individuals

Plan describes what we will do differently

Plan is based on identification of the behavioral function of problem behaviors and the lifestyle goals of an individual

A Context forPositive Behavior Support
using fba to design effective support the simple bip

How can we preventproblem situations?

What should we teachas a replacement behavior?

How do we increase rewardof appropriate behavior?

How do we minimizerewardof problem behavior?

Need negativeconsequencesfor problem behavior?

Need safetyroutines?

What datashould we collect?

Are we doing the plan?

Is the plan working?

Using FBA to Design Effective SupportThe Simple BIP
throughout process remember strengths based planning

What does the student like to:

Talk about?

Read about?

Draw about?

Write about?

Play with?

What is the student interested in? What do they enjoy?

Identify the student’s successes:

Where are they successful?

When are they successful?

With whom are they successful?

Throughout Process Remember Strengths-Based Planning
replacement behaviors must be

Do-able

Efficient

Serve the same function

Socially appropriate

Remember to consider “I can live with for now” behavior.

These skills have to be directly taught

Replacement Behaviors Must Be
replacement behavior needs

Teach student how to communicate need for:

Help

A break

Interaction

Attention

Time alone

Reduced demands

Alternative assignment

More time to finish

Movement

Replacement Behavior Needs
replacement behavior skills

Specific

Observable, Acknowledgeable, Teachable (O-A-T)

Taught individually, in small groups, with whole class, or whole school

Use SAIG lessons to teach skills identified in BIP

Academic behavior skills (organization, raising hand)

Problem solving skills (deep breathing, get help)

Pro-social skills (ask to play a game, say “hi”)

Replacement Behavior Skills
behavior intervention planning

Address the behavior of concern by teaching a new way to meet the function

Address the triggers and setting events by “situation manipulation”

Address the consequences by modification

Behavior Intervention Planning
layering interventions for efficiency

What interventions do you already have in place in your school that could be used as part of BIPs to address Setting Events – Consequence modifications?

e.g., CICO, After-school re-teaching of expectations, Classroom Cool Tools

Layering Interventions for Efficiency
function based support
Function-Based Support

Setting Event (Slow Trigger)

Antecedent (Fast Trigger)

Problem Behavior

Maintaining Consequences and Function

Goal: Teach a new way to get needs met

why teach social academic skills

Behavior management problems are social skills problems.

The adults need to make adjustments – what does the child need?

Academic and social competence are interrelated.

The more active in learning process, the lower the discipline concerns.

Next to family, school has the most influence in the development of self.

School is a social system.

Setting Event (Slow Trigger)

Antecedent (Fast Trigger)

Problem Behavior

Maintaining Consequences and Function

Why Teach Social/Academic Skills?
using cool tools direct instruction as prevention support

Teach new routines & physical arrangements to support student.

Teaching all students how to transition to class when arrive to school late.

Cool Tools that target thinking process, beliefs, etc.

Teaching all students that we all work at different speeds and that’s OK.

Setting Event (Slow Trigger)

Antecedent (Fast Trigger)

Problem Behavior

Maintaining Consequences and Function

Using Cool Tools (Direct Instruction) as Prevention Support
slide27

Adapted from Responding to Problem Behavior in Schools: The Behavior Education Program by Crone, Horner, and Hawken

Example Daily Progress Report

NAME:______________________ DATE:__________________

Teachers please indicate YES (2), SO-SO (1), or NO (0) regarding the student’s achievement.

Adapted from Grant Middle School STAR CLUB

competing behavior pathways model
Competing Behavior Pathways Model

Conscious choice to ignore, regulation skill, appropriate comment

Ideal

Outcome

Completes all work in class

Desired Behavior

Sleep medicine impairment

Antecedent

Peer Comment

Threats,

loud voice

Current

Outcome

Behavior Interferes w/ Learning

Work output is reduced

Setting Event(s)

Taught to use regulation skill when in hallway for drink

Allowed to leave to get a drink of water

in the hallway

Goes to independent reading area and writes in journal

Replacement (Taught) Behavior

slide29

Referencing the FBA chosen by team to work on today:

Begin brainstorming interventions for replacement behaviors and HOW to teach

List at least 2 options for teaching and building fluency of the student with the new behavior

Fill these in under teaching strategies

function based support1
Function-Based Support

Problem

Behavior

Setting Event

Trigger

Maintaining

Consequence

Setting Event (Slow Trigger)

Antecedent (Fast Trigger)

Problem Behavior

Maintaining Consequences and Function

Antecedent Intervention

Goal: Make problem behavior irrelevant

antecedent setting event interventions

How can the antecedent or setting events be changed so that problem behaviors can be prevented?

What can be added to daily routines to make desired behaviors more likely and situations more pleasant for the student?

Setting Event (Slow Trigger)

Antecedent (Fast Trigger)

Problem Behavior

Maintaining Consequences and Function

Antecedent/Setting Event Interventions
examples of preventive strategies

• Modify the curriculum (interest preferences, choice, sequence)

• Modify the demands (quantity, difficulty, input, output, groupings, alternative tasks)

• CoolTools for entire class/grade/school focusing on prevention

• Reorganize the physical & interactional setting (have supplies available, pair seats, independent seats)

Setting Event (Slow Trigger)

Antecedent (Fast Trigger)

Problem Behavior

Maintaining Consequences and Function

Examples of Preventive Strategies
cico as prevention support

CICO involves helping student transition to school day

Increased adultsupport& monitoring, instructional prompts in the natural environment

Promotes all staff using similar language

Setting Event (Slow Trigger)

Antecedent (Fast Trigger)

Problem Behavior

Maintaining Consequences and Function

CICO as Prevention Support
slide34

Referencing the same FBA:

Begin brainstorming interventions for setting events and triggers.

List at least 2 in each box (setting event and antecedent).

Supports must be linked to triggers in the Competing Pathway.

Supports need to work for BOTH staff and student.

function based support2
Function-Based Support

Maintaining Consequences and Function

Setting Event (Slow Trigger)

Antecedent (Fast Trigger)

Problem Behavior

Consequence Intervention

Goal: Make problem behavior ineffective

consequence strategies

Must matchmaintainingconsequence of problem behavior (function)

Reinforce and reward replacementbehaviors and response to prevention strategies

Minimizereinforcement of problem behaviors

Includestrategies that reinforce entire class/grade (larger population) for using skills taught through cool tools. This contributes to the more supportive environment.

Consequence Strategies

Maintaining Consequences and Function

Setting Event (Slow Trigger)

Antecedent (Fast Trigger)

Problem Behavior

THIS IS NOT REWARDING BAD BEHAVIOR!

testing or escalating behavior

Students may test the system/adult response, wanting to return to the “old” way of doing business

Plan needs to include teaching strategies not only for expected behavior, but also adult response to inappropriate behavior.

Some student behavior may escalate to crisis level

Follow district crisis plan, begin complex FBA/BIP process to fine tune plan

Testing or Escalating Behavior?

Maintaining Consequences and Function

Setting Event (Slow Trigger)

Antecedent (Fast Trigger)

Problem Behavior

slide39

Referencing the same FBA:

Begin brainstorming interventions for maintaining consequences (how do you honor the function but on YOUR terms)

List Strategies (at least 2 for each in the box) for:

Positive acknowledgment for replacement and desired behaviors

SPECIFIC corrective consequences for problem behavior

plan for implementation of the bip

Transform ideas for BIP elements into a formal plan for implementation:

Who will do what?

When will it happen?

How will we know?

Logistical arrangements

Who needs to know?

What materials are needed?

Who will tell the student?

Plan for substitutes?

Will we need a crisis plan?

Plan for Implementation of the BIP
  • Use BIP Action Planning tool
data based decision making

Student outcome data is used:

To identify youth in need of support and to identify appropriate intervention

For on-going progress-monitoring of response to intervention

To exit or transition youth off of interventions

Intervention integrity or process data is used:

To monitor the effectiveness of the intervention itself

To make decisions regarding the continuum/menu of interventions/supports

Data-Based Decision-Making
data used for ongoing progress monitoring

DPR points

ODRs, suspensions

Attendance

Grades

Same data used to monitor lower level

selected interventions

Data Used for Ongoing ProgressMonitoring
replacement behaviors reflected in daily progress report

Prompting of replacement behaviors

Facilitate transference and generalization of new skills being taught

To monitor progress

Reinforcement connected to use of new skills

Replacement Behaviors Reflected in Daily Progress Report
data based decision rules for response

Typically the same decision rules that apply to responding to lower levels of intervention

For example, goal for all kids in selected interventions is to earn >80% DPR points for 4-6 weeks and no further ODRs

Makes data-management more efficient

Data-Based Decision Rules for“Response”
recommended time frames for data review

CICO, SAIG, CnC, & Brief FBA/BIP

Student data should be reviewed to ensure plan is being implemented and for possible plan modifications at least once a week by Intervention Facilitator/s.

Brief FBA/BIP (only)

Student data should also be reviewed to ensure plan is being implemented and for possible plan modifications at least once a month by Problem-Solving Team (and/or Brief FBA/BIP team).

Recommended Time-Frames forData Review
slide47

Review the competing pathway developed and consider Who, What, By when

Begin Filling in BIP Action Planning Tool in your workbook

slide48

If student response is weak based on your data, consider:

Environmental adaptations

AND

Does the student need

OR

Increased attention, relationship, and incentive through mentoring (performance deficit)

More intensive social skill instruction (skill deficit)

why teach social skills

Behavior management problems are social skills problems

Academic and social competence are interrelated

Social skills curriculum must match the specific need

Why Teach Social Skills?
slide51
BASIC SAIG

Re-teaching of school-wide expectations – Cool Tool format

Smaller group

In natural location

Increased acknowledgement

More frequent pre-corrects

Modified Cool Tool format

More concrete examples/role playing

Differentiated modality of presentation

Intensive SAIG (linked to FBA)

Specific skills identified in FBA the FBA

May be intense SAIG lessons

May be supplemental lessons

Higher frequency acknowledgement included in plan (nearing 15:1 then fade)

May include more ”intra-personal” skills – self esteem, response to trauma, recognizing emotions

2. Lesson format

May be written ala Cool Tool

Curriculum based

teaching guidelines

Teach social behaviors as academics

Make sure to communicate cueing and prompting opportunities to ALL STAFF

Reinforce desired &/or expected behaviors

Our positive reinforcement rate should be approaching 15+:1

Systematically address infrequent and frequent errors (problem behaviors)

Complete on-going assessment to determine effectiveness

Teaching Guidelines
strategies for generalization

Involve other staff members

Use examples from universalinstruction/universalexpectations

Teach generalcase and skillvariations

Feeling angry – strategies for different environments (classroom, playground, cafeteria)

Teach self-managementstrategies

Teach and practice within, and across, settings

Strategies for Generalization
social skill instruction considerations

Skill sets and purpose of group are more intensive and more of an affective focus than basic SAIG

These are FBA identified skills that need to be taught

Culturally appropriate behavior lesson plans/curriculum that addresses skill set (may include teaching cultural capital)

Social Skill Instruction Considerations
how to teach it

Frequency will be dictated by data

May be high frequency at first then fade to less frequent.

Direct instruction in group, followed by prompting and high frequency feedback in the setting

Multiple people involved in the teaching and high rate of acknowledging/feedback (15-20:1)

Person teaching the skill, greeter, classroom teacher, parent

How to teach it
steps of a behavioral lesson plan

1) Explain expectations & why need

Check for student understanding/buy-in

2) Modelexamples

Check for student understanding/buy-in

3) Model non-examples

Check for student understanding/buy-in

4) Model examples

5) Students practice

6) ACKNOWLEDGEthe student behavior

Steps of a Behavioral Lesson Plan
successful social skill instruction

Pay attention if you are choosing to use pieces of a packaged curriculum rather than your already created universal behavior lesson plans.

Make sure intensity of material/instruction matches intensity of identified need.

Ensure that the material used for intensive skill instruction is linked back to universal expectations.

Stand-alone curriculum vs curriculum made to scaffold skills; stand alone curriculum can be used

Skills Streaming

Tough Kids Social Skills; scaffolding curriculum

Anger management

Trauma

Successful Social Skill Instruction

Build social skill instruction on top of strong universal curriculum and practices

slide58

Example Daily Progress Report

NAME:______________________ DATE:__________________

Teachers please indicate YES (2), SO-SO (1), or NO (0) regarding the student’s achievement to the following goals.

Sub-goals are what have been taught as part of BIP

Adapted from Grant Middle School STAR CLUB

Adapted from Responding to Problem Behavior in Schools: The Behavior Education Program by Crone, Horner, and Hawken

points to remember

For social skills instruction to be powerful in impact:

Reinforcement/acknowledgement rate should be approaching 15-20:1 for students demonstrating the new skill/expected behavior then faded

Consequences should be on a continuum of less to more significant while being PAIRED with high reinforcement.

This sets stage for old behavior to be less powerful than new behavior

Points to Remember
slide60

How does the more intensive SAIG fit into your system?

Who will teach, when will it occur, how will you progress monitor? Will you use a formal curriculum?

What do you already have in place that you can use?

Add to your multi-level action plan

activities of mentoring

Relationships & Tasks

(Developmental) (Instrumental)

Activities of Mentoring

(Karcher et al. 2006)

what about the student may suggest the need for a school based mentor

Rewards and consequences appear ineffective

Student:

SEEKS attention through behavior

lacks motivation

appears to lack self-esteem or self-confidence

lacks positive adult role models

appears to dislike school

What about the student may suggest the need for a school-based mentor?
clarifying mentoring
BASIC Mentoring

1. Focus on “Connections”

Once per week, 20 minutes

Positive activity

2. Not monitoring work, behavior, etc.

INTENSIVE Mentoring (linked to FBA)

Focus on Engagement with school AND Goal-setting with a trusted adult..

2. Specific skills identified in FBA, the FBA

May identify skills, deficits to set goals on and to monitor

May identify skills to be taught, practiced, and reinforced

May include more ”intra-personal” skills – self esteem, response to trauma, recognizing emotions

Clarifying…Mentoring
intensive mentor s role

To provide guidance, support, and encouragement for the student while modeling target skills such as

effective communication

empathy and concern for others

openness and honesty

Check-in with student around student personal goal

academics

behavior

attendance

Mentor usually has commitment for entire academic year at high tier 2 (increased frequency, increased duration, and longer chronicity)

Intensive Mentor’s Role
mentoring as a tier 2 i ndividualized intervention

Any staff person can be a mentor

Should be voluntary

Match one student per staff person

Mentors agree to spend at least 30 minutes per week with the student – could be spread out over the week (differentiate basic versus BIP – intensity, duration, chronicity)

Mentoring is not the same as Check-In/Check-Out

Mentoring as a Tier 2 Individualized Intervention
what mentoring fosters livonia public schools information on mentoring

Student may have negative role model

The relationship fosters a new way of relating to people

Student may hide feelings and set up barriers

The relationship fosters how to express emotions appropriately

Student may distrust adults

The relationship fosters trust of caring adults

What Mentoring FostersLivonia Public SchoolsInformation on Mentoring
determine program goals and objectives

Based on needs of students

Determined by team using data and FBA

Focus on basic needs

Academic

Achievement

Behavior

Communication

Attendance

Social skills

Determine Program Goals and Objectives
orient mentors students parents

Before formal process begins

Stakeholders should understand roles and hold positive expectations

Mentors must be aware of student needs and characteristics

Determine individual student goals and outcomes

Orient Mentors, Students, & Parents
monitor mentoring process

Continuous monitoring to determine success using DPR and target skills

Provide ongoing support for the mentor

Formal/informal

Where

When

How often

Monitor Mentoring Process
slide72

Example Daily Progress Report

NAME:______________________ DATE:__________________

Teachers please indicate YES (2), SO-SO (1), or NO (0) regarding the student’s achievement to the following goals.

Adapted from Grant Middle School STAR CLUB

Adapted from Responding to Problem Behavior in Schools: The Behavior Education Program by Crone, Horner, and Hawken

slide73

Develop the system for intensive mentoring or SAIG for your building

Who? (intensive mentors; teach intensive SAIG?)

How will the students be supported throughout?

What is the time commitment?

How will students be selected and progress monitored?

Is there an additional layer of acknowledgement?

Add to multi-leveled action plan

slide74

Develop the system for responding to and de-escalating severe behavior.

Who? (What roles? e.g., leader, support, sub)

Procedure? (How initiated, point of contact)

What is the plan? (Know it, use it, how is plan developed and communicated)

What is process for student?

Post-vention? (After—debrief, assess plan and team effectiveness)

Or:
tier 2 and 3 tools

Monitoring Advanced Tiers Tool (MATT)

Progress monitoring for tier 2 and 3.

Like TIC, should be done 2/year until fidelity at tier

Benchmarks for Advanced Tiers (BAT)

Yearly fidelity tool

Done in spring with BoQ at tier 1

Tier 2 and 3 Tools
benchmarks for advanced tiers

Complete the BAT online to “capture” all your work to date.

Plan when next assessment of BAT will be done (2x/yr). Plan when next assessment of MATT will be done (1x/qtr).

BAT window opened by local coordinator

Teams access using school code

www.pbisapps.org

Benchmarks for Advanced Tiers
resources saig

Bully Proofing your School

Cool Tools: An Active Approach to Social Responsibility

First Steps to Success

Good Talking Words

Second Step Violence-Prevention Curricula

Stop and Think

Skillstreaming

The Social Skills Curriculum

The Tough Kid Social Skills

The Walker Social Skills Curriculum: The Accepts Program

Resources—SAIG
resources mentoring

www.mentoringminds.com/ResponsetoIntervention.php

www.emstac.org/registered/topics/posbehavior/early/mentoring.htm

www.mentoring.org/downloads/mentoring_4.pdf

www.pdx.edu/mentoring-research/youth-mentoring

www.beamentor.org

www.beamentor.org/main/mentoringtools/trainingmanuals.asp

www.checkandconnect.umn.edu/

Resources—Mentoring
evaluation survey
Evaluation Survey

Please use the following link to complete the evaluation survey http://tinyurl.com/S400SecondaryTraining