slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
WELCOME TO THE TOUR OF THE CARDIFF REFORM SYNAGOGUE PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
WELCOME TO THE TOUR OF THE CARDIFF REFORM SYNAGOGUE

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 35

WELCOME TO THE TOUR OF THE CARDIFF REFORM SYNAGOGUE - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 265 Views
  • Uploaded on

WELCOME TO THE TOUR OF THE CARDIFF REFORM SYNAGOGUE. Written and produced by Graham Davies for Cardiff Advisory Service for Education (CASE) Special thanks to the members of the School Visits Team of the Cardiff New Synagogue. Schools Service.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'WELCOME TO THE TOUR OF THE CARDIFF REFORM SYNAGOGUE' - kareem-leach


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide2

Written and produced by Graham Davies

for

Cardiff Advisory Service for Education (CASE)

Special thanks to

the members of the School Visits Team

of the Cardiff New Synagogue

Schools Service

slide3

Welcome to the Cardiff New Synagogue. Our synagogue is part of the Reform Movement which tries to find new ways of making Judaism relevant in today’s world.

slide6

Look up and you will see the beautiful windows which describe festivals and events in Judaism

slide7

These are the stained glass windows. What can you see on them? What festivals do you think they celebrate? Click “next” to see if you are right

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

slide8

1.

2.

3.

Passover Purim Shabbat

4.

5.

6.

Rosh Hashanah Yom Kippur Simchat Torah

slide9

At the eastern end of the synagogue is the Holy Ark (Aron Hakodesh). The Ark takes its name from the Ark of the Covenant. It can be a simple cupboard or a part of the building.

slide10

This is the curtain of the Holy Ark. It is made of silk and is beautifully embroidered.

What symbols can you see on it?

slide11

What do you think is in the Holy Ark ? Click on one of the following:

  • (a) The Rabbi’s sandwiches
  • (b)The Torah scrolls
  • (c)A collection of candles
slide15

In a service the Holy Ark is open.The Ark contains the scrolls of the Law (Torah) which are known as the five books of Moses.

On the sabbath they are taken out of the Ark, carried in a procession around the synagogue before being read..

The scrolls are beautifully “dressed”. What can you see on them?

Click here to see the Torah being processed and undressed

slide16

The Torah scroll contains the Jewish law. When it is “dressed” it will have the following:

  • A length of material to bind it tightly.
  • an embroidered mantle to protect it.
  • A crown and silver bells which tinkle when the scroll is moved.
  • A breastplate as a reminder of what the High Priest wore in the Temple
  • A “yad” or pointer made of silver and used to avoid touching the scroll.
slide17

You can see the crown on the top of the Torah and the crown reminds us that God is king.

  • Why do you think there are bells hanging down?
  • Click on one
  • To make it look pretty
  • Because bells ring out good news
  • To alert the worshippers that the Torah is now being brought out.
slide21

The Torah is written in Hebrew. Scribes are trained to copy the Torah and use a quill pen and vegetable ink. They must concentrate very hard and not talk when writing. Each scroll takes at least a year to write.

The scroll is written on parchment – animal skin – and the text must have no mistakes. Between 60-80 pieces of parchment are used and sewn together and attached to wooden handles.

slide23

Why do you think the scroll must not be touched by human hand?

  • In case it disappears in a puff of smoke
  • The scroll is a sacred object
  • It could burn the fingers
slide27

When a scroll is being read a pointer or yad is used to point to the words. The scroll is sacred and must not be touched by a human hand.

The yad is usually made of silver and on the end is a sculptured hand with a finger pointing out.

Click here to see the Torah scroll being dressed

slide28

What symbol do you see here?

How many branches?

When is an eight branched candlestick used?

slide29

The Menorah is a seven branched candlestick which reminds Jewish people of what was in the Temple at Jerusalem.

Why is light so important in religions?

slide30

Above the Ark is a lamp which is always burning. This is the ner tamid – eternal light.

It reminds Jewish worshippers of the oil lamp which was always alight in the Temple in Jerusalem.

slide31

In a corner of the synagogue is this wooden board with lots of names on it. What do you think it is? 1939 is a big clue!

slide32

The mezuzah is a small case, made out of metal, wood or plastic, which is nailed to the right hand door post of every door in a Jewish home, except the bathroom. It will also be in the synagogue. Inside is a small parchment scroll on which are written in Hebrew the words of the SHEMA, i.e. Deuteronomy 6:5-9.

Jewish people will often touch the mezuzah as they enter the room and then kiss their fingers. The mezuzah is a symbol of God's blessing, presence and protection.

slide33

In this synagogue both men and boys over the age of 13 must wear the tallit. Women and girls wear the tallit if they choose.

Here you can see the tallit(prayer shawl) being worn. It has long fringes and tassels in the four corners. It is worn over the shoulders or the head.

The fringes remind the worshipper of the commandments of God – 613 in all

You can also see the kippah or prayer cap. Jewish men wear them especially at prayer to cover the head to show respect for God