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PowerPoint Presentations… It’s About the Content! PowerPoint Presentation
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PowerPoint Presentations… It’s About the Content!

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PowerPoint Presentations… It’s About the Content!

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PowerPoint Presentations… It’s About the Content!

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  1. PowerPoint Presentations… It’s About the Content!

  2. Content? Organizing content Missing content Arranging content

  3. Mrs. Quick needs a new t–shirt…

  4. T-Shirt Rule… Bulleted Text versus Narrative

  5. Bulleted Text…fits on the front of a t-shirt

  6. Narrative… The narrative is what comes out of your mouth…the words you say…every word of which should not appear on your PowerPoint slide…

  7. PowerPoint Slide Picture of O’Nan Stewart O’Nan Primary Contemporary is… Stephen King (Franklin) Picture of King

  8. Narrative RUTH FRANKLIN The New York Times May 26, 2002 WISH YOU WERE HERE By Stewart O'Nan. Like a jack-in-the-box with a broken spring, Stephen King keeps popping up in Stewart O'Nan's work. In ''The Names of the Dead,'' O'Nan's second novel, a book by King winks at the reader from a nightstand. The homage is unavoidable in O'Nan's third novel, ''The Speed Queen'': the narrator, a young woman on death row, dictates her story into a tape destined for an unnamed writer whose books include ''Carrie'' and ''The Shining.'' Even O'Nan's recent foray into nonfiction, ''The Circus Fire,'' bears the prints of the macabre: it recounts, often in gruesome detail, a deadly blaze at a Ringling Brothers show in the 1940's. O'Nan has inherited from King an acute sensitivity to the vein of horror beneath even the most prosaic settings. But unlike King, he never loses his grasp on reality. Rather than indulge in the excesses of the supernatural, he uses the terrors of everyday life -- nightmares, violent crimes, wars -- as a channel to the most intimate reaches of the human mind.

  9. WORKS CITED “Storyboard.” World Book Online Reference Center. 2006. World Book. Kenmore West H.S. Lib., Buffalo, NY. 24 Feb. 2006 <http://www.worldbookonline.com/>. Franklin, Ruth. “Everyday Terrors.” New York Times.com. 26 May 2006. New York Times. 24 Feb. 2006 <http://www.newyorktimes.com/>.