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Chapter 7: Evaluating Educational Technology and Integration Strategies

Chapter 7: Evaluating Educational Technology and Integration Strategies

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Chapter 7: Evaluating Educational Technology and Integration Strategies

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  1. Chapter 7: Evaluating Educational Technology and Integration Strategies Lindsey Blome, Jared Petz, Andrea Branam, Jessica Crowden, Amera Covert

  2. Identify sources of information for evaluating educational technology and digital media • Outline the considerations and tools used to evaluate software applications • Describe and explain the key criteria used to evaluate Web sources • Describe the tools for evaluating the effectiveness of technology • Compare and analyze the methods used to evaluate student projects • Identify different technology integration strategies by classroom layout and design • Define and describe the value of a curriculum page • Describe ways to integrate technology into specific curriculum subject areas • Describe authentic assessment tools for student projects • Identify and compare possible sources of funding for classroom technology Chapter Objectives

  3. School districts and state departments of education • Many school districts compile software evaluations that provide guidance on subject-specific software. • Professional education organizations • Many local, state, regional, national, and international educational organizations provde extensive information on how to evaluate educational resources. Sources of information for evaluating educational technology and digital media

  4. Catalogs • Often, companies list hardware and software suited for educational use in their catalogs. • Conferences • Every year, dozens of national and state organizations host technology conferences. • Technology conferences Sources of information for evaluating educational technology and digital media

  5. Content • When evaluating educational software, content is the most important area to consider. • Valid • Documentation and technical support • When evaluating software consider the technical support and documentation the software offers. • Documentation and technical support Evaluating software applications

  6. Technical quality and ease of use • Technical quality refers to how well the software presents itself and how well it works. Ease of use refers to anything that makes the software easy to use. Evaluating software applications

  7. Affiliation • Affiliation refers to the professional organization, school, school district, university, company, or government office with which a particular Web site is associated. • Purpose and Objectivity • Purpose is the reason the Web site was created or the intent of the Web site. Objectivity is the process of determining or interpreting the intent or purpose of the Web page and if it is free of bias, such as advertising. Evaluating web resources

  8. Audience and currency • The audience is the individual group intended to view and use the Web page. Currency is the measure of how up to date, or timely, the Web page content is and how often it is updated. Evaluating web resources

  9. Authentic assessment • Authentic assessment can be formal or informal and aims to present students with tasks that mirror the objectives and challenges typical of their instructional activities. • Checklists, rating scales, and rubrics • When using any authentic learning technique, many teachers use a checklist, a rating scale, or a rubric to evaluate the learning process. Assessment tools for evaluating the effectiveness of technology integration

  10. Teacher observation • When evaluating technology integration or curriculum integration, one of the more widely used authentic assessment techniques is teacher observation. Assessment tools for evaluating the effectiveness of technology integration

  11. Evaluating planning • Effective presentations involve planning, students also must plan a project before creating it, if it is to be effective. • Visual learning techniques • Flowcharts • Storyboards Evaluating technology supported student projects

  12. One computer classroom • Most classrooms are equipped with one digital media computer and are referred to as a one-computer classroom. • Multicomputer classroom • Having two or more computers in your classroom fosters additional learning opportunities that allow flexibility in computer usage and make technology integration a integral part of the curriculum. Different technology integration strategies by classroom layout and design

  13. Computer labs and media centers • Computer labs and media centers offer teachers instructional opportunities that are not possible in a one-, two-, or even a five-computer classroom. Different technology integration strategies by classroom layout and design

  14. Curriculum pages • One of the main technology integration challenges that teachers face today is determining exactly how to use the Internet in their classrooms. Value of a curriculum page

  15. Exceptional education integration • Also known as special education curriculum usually contains instruction in all curriculum areas with adaptations made for students with unique characteristics or special needs. • Interdisciplinary Integration • An interdisciplinary curriculum usually includes two or more academic disciplines or curriculum areas to form a cross-discipline or subject-integrated lesson. • Cross-discipline lessons • Subject-integrated lessons Ways to integrate technology into specific curriculum subject areas

  16. Teacher Observation • Project Rubrics • Evaluation Rubrics • Quizzes • Peer Editing/Critiques Authentic assessment tools for student projects

  17. Fund-raising drives and academic contests • Class car washes, bake sales, and other activities can help raise money to purchase additional computers, hardware components, and software for classrooms. • Grants • The majority of outside funding sources for technology fall under a general category called grants. • Grants Possible sources of funding for classroom technology

  18. Technology will not make a difference in the quality of students graduating from K-12 schools unless teachers learn how to integrate the use of technology into their curriculum. Summary of evaluating educational technology and integration strategies